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I'm having a hard time trying to figure out the meaning of this advice from Attribute Usage Guildelines:

Do not define a parameter with both named and positional arguments. The following code example illustrates this pattern.

And the code is:

public class NameAttribute: Attribute 
{
   string userName;
   int age;

   // This is a positional argument.
   public NameAttribute (string userName) 
   { 
       this.userName = userName;
   }
   public string UserName 
   { 
      get 
      {
         return userName; 
      }
   }
   // This is a named argument.
   public int Age 
   { 
      get 
      {
         return age;
      }
      set 
      {
         age = value;
      }
   } 
}

Now, I'm sorry if it's really simple and I am wasting your time. But I just don't understand the meaning and what example demonstrates. The fact that English is not my native language might be a factor, but I didn't experience any difficulties reading MSDN before. I also tried to read the translated version of this article, but it makes even less sense to me.

So, if someone would be kind enough to rephrase and explain it to me, that would be really helpful. If you can also explain why MSDN advises to do so, I'm all ears.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you are the victim of a crummy example, it doesn't actually demonstrate the problem. A better example of doing it wrong is adding this constructor:

public NameAttribute (string userName, int age) 
{ 
    this.userName = userName;
    this.Age = age;
}

Now the client code could use the attribute this way:

[Name("foo", 42)]

and this way:

[Name("foo", Age = 42)]

Both are equally valid, the client programmer won't be able to make up his mind which one to choose. A much nastier example would be this constructor:

public NameAttribute(int age) {
    this.userName = "unspecified";
    this.Age = age;
}

which allows:

[Name(42, Age = 43)]
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, if that's the case, I do see the point. Thanks, I think that's it. The example on another language wouldn't event compile so I think it's possible that it is also wrong in general. – Dyppl Mar 5 '11 at 9:15

Think about how you would have to use such an attribute:

[Name("Jack", Age = 25)]
public class ClassToDecorate { }

Now, this doesn't look all that clear because two styles are being mixed: UserName is being set via the attribute's constructor ("positional"), but Age is being explicitly set as a property ("named").

The guideline is suggesting that it would be better to redesign the attribute such that exactly one of the following decorations would work:

[Name("Jack", 25)] // Positional only

(or)

[Name(UserName = "Jack", Age = 25)] // Named only
share|improve this answer
    
But such attributes are all over the place in BCL, like AttributeUsage and many others – Dyppl Mar 5 '11 at 6:54
    
A lot of the Framework Design Guidelines are from experiences the .NET team had over the years - they didn't get everything right on the first try (but are stuck with the APIs now), so the guidelines aren't meant to say what the framework does. Rather, they're what the framework would have done, had they known then what they know now. – Austin Lamb Mar 5 '11 at 6:56
    
@Austin Lamb: yeah, I know, but using of AttributeUsage like that in the same guideline is kinda messed up. – Dyppl Mar 5 '11 at 6:58
    
Also, I don't understand what "a parameter" refers to in this example – Dyppl Mar 5 '11 at 6:59
    
@Dyppl - I believe "a parameter" is referring to not creating a property that can be set with a constructor and by a property setter. Use one or the other. – Metro Smurf Mar 5 '11 at 7:24

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