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How can I add BOM (unicode signature) while saving file in python:

file_old = open('old.txt', mode='r', encoding='utf-8')
file_new = open('new.txt', mode='w', encoding='utf-16-le')
file_new.write(file_old.read())

I need to convert file to utf-16-le + BOM. Now script is working great, except that there is no BOM.

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for line in file_old: file_new.write(line) is vastly more memory efficient. And why can't you use any of the numerous software that already does this? –  delnan Mar 5 '11 at 8:41
    
Text editors have to open file to "save as", and it is pretty big. Other software is shareware, or hard to find. Besides, I'm just learning python. Save by line maybe more efficient, but is more complex. –  Qiao Mar 5 '11 at 8:47
    
If the file is pretty big, that may be all the more reason to convert it line by line -- despite its "complexity". –  martineau Mar 5 '11 at 17:30
    
And it also depends on how often script is executed. In my case file is 100 mb, converted in <10 seconds once a month. –  Qiao Mar 5 '11 at 17:51
1  
@JohnMachin actually had the correct answer here. –  Omnifarious Dec 7 '12 at 22:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Write it directly at the beginning of the file:

file_new.write('\ufeff')
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1  
Thank, it is often very hard to figure out such simple thing for first time. –  Qiao Mar 5 '11 at 9:29
1  
@Qiao: It's not that simple. See my answer. –  John Machin Apr 20 '11 at 12:35
    
@JohnMachin - You're right, your answer is the right one. –  Omnifarious Dec 7 '12 at 22:03

It's better to use constants from 'codecs' module.

import codecs
f.write(codecs.BOM_UTF16_LE)
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1  
This is actually the wrong answer for two reasons. First, @JohnMachin has the write answer. Don't use 'utf-16le', just use 'utf-18'. Secondly (and more importantly) given that the OP's code sets an encoding this won't result in the correct behavior at all. Especially on Python3. You are giving bytes to a thing that wants a str. –  Omnifarious Dec 7 '12 at 21:59
    
Err.. 'right', not 'write'. That's what happens when you play with code in one window and write comments in another. –  Omnifarious Dec 7 '12 at 22:10
    
@Omnifarious: And utf-16, not utf-18. :p –  jamesdlin Apr 2 '13 at 18:37
    
@jamesdlin: Oh, oops! I need to do better about typos like that. –  Omnifarious Apr 2 '13 at 20:13
    
In Python 3, using (default) text-mode open, it errors because you toss it bytes, not string, as Omnifarious already hinted. Casting the bytes to a string, as in f.write(str(codecs.BOM_UTF8)), gets you b'\xef\xbb\xbf' at the start of your file. –  RolfBly Aug 6 at 10:08

Why do you think you need to specifically make it UTF16LE? Just use 'utf16' as the encoding, Python will write it in your endianness with the appropriate BOM, and all the consumer needs to be told is that the file is UTF-16 ... that's the whole point of having a BOM.

If the consumer is insisting that the file must be encoded in UTF16LE, then you don't need a BOM.

If the file is written the way that you specify, and the consumer opens it with UTF16LE encoding, they will get a \ufeff at the start of the file, which is a nuisance, and needs to be ignored.

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I had a similar situation where a 3rd party app did not accept the file I generated unless it had a BOM.

For some reason in Python 2.7 the following does not work for me

write('\ufeff')

I had to substitute it with

write('\xff\xfe')

and that is the same as

write(codecs.BOM_UTF16_LE)

my final output file was written with the following code

import codecs
mytext = "Help me"

with open("c:\\temp\\myFile.txt", 'w') as f:
    f.write(codecs.BOM_UTF16_LE)
    f.write(mytext.encode('utf-16-le'))

This answer may be useless for the original asker but it may help someone like me who stumbles upon this issue

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byte_order_mark#UTF-8

Just add BOM byte sequence

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I tried file_new.write('FE FF') in the beginning, but it just wrote this to file as text. –  Qiao Mar 5 '11 at 8:49
    
@FractalizeR: The UTF-8 BOM is scarcely relevant to the question. –  John Machin Apr 20 '11 at 6:21
    
@John I don't think so. See the answer from @Ocaso –  FractalizeR Apr 20 '11 at 6:35
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@FractalizeR: You gave a link to the UTF EIGHT BOM. The question and @Ocaso's answer are all about a UTF SIXTEEN BOM. I've just noticed the "add BOM byte sequence". The OP is using Python 3 and is writing str (Unicode) objects to his file-handle -- you suggest he should somehow write b'\xff\xfe' to that file-handle?? Summary: -1 –  John Machin Apr 20 '11 at 12:32
    
@John I didn't suggest writing anything to file handle. Please reread my answer. I just suggested to add BOM byte sequence. BOM is just a Byte order mark. It doesn't necessarily need to be b'\xff\xfe' or whatever. Read WikiPedia article please. –  FractalizeR Apr 20 '11 at 13:10

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