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I'm trying to develop a javascript game engine and I've came across this problem:

When I press space the character jumps. When I press the right arrow the character moves right.

The thing is that when I keep pressing right then I press space the character jumps then it stops moving.

I use the keydown function to get the key pressed, how can I check if there're multiple keys pressed down?

share|improve this question
2  
Here's a demo of a web page that automatically prints a list of all keys that are pressed: stackoverflow.com/a/13651016/975097 – Anderson Green Dec 1 '12 at 2:56
up vote 119 down vote accepted

Multiple keystroke detection is easy if you understand the concept

The way I do it is like this:

var map = []; // Or you could call it "key"
onkeydown = onkeyup = function(e){
    e = e || event; // to deal with IE
    map[e.keyCode] = e.type == 'keydown';
    /*insert conditional here*/
}

This code is very simple: Since the computer only passes one keystroke at a time, an array is created to keep track of multiple keys. The array can then be used to check for one or more keys at once.

Just to explain, let's say you press A and B, each fires a keydown event that sets map[e.keyCode] to the value of e.type == keydown, which evaluates to either true or false. Now both map[65] and map[66] are set to true. When you let go of A, the keyup event fires, causing the same logic to determine the opposite result for map[65] (A), which is now false, but since map[66] (B) is still "down" (it hasn't triggered a keyup event), it remains true.

The map array, through both events, looks like this:

// keydown A 
// keydown B
[
    65:true,
    66:true
]
// keyup A
// keydown B
[
    65:false,
    66:true
]

There are two things you can do now:

A) A Key logger (example) can be created as a reference for later when you want to quickly figure out one or more key codes. Assuming you have defined an html element and pointed to it with the variable element.

element.innerHTML = '';
var i, l = map.length;
for(i = 0; i < l; i ++){
    if(map[i]){
        element.innerHTML += '<hr>' + i;
    }
}

Note: You can easily grab an element by its id attribute.

<div id="element"></div>

This creates an html element that can be easily referenced in javascript with element

alert(element); // [Object HTMLDivElement]

You don't even have to use document.getElementById() or $() to grab it. But for the sake of compatibility, use of jQuery's $() is more widely recommended.

Just make sure the script tag comes after the body of the HTML. Optimization tip: Most big-name websites put the script tag after the body tag for optimization. This is because the script tag blocks further elements from loading until its script is finished downloading. Putting it ahead of the content allows the content to load beforehand.

B (which is where your interest lies) You can check for one or more keys at a time where /*insert conditional here*/ was, take this example:

if(map[17] && map[16] && map[65]){ // CTRL+SHIFT+A
    alert('Control Shift A');
}else if(map[17] && map[16] && map[66]){ // CTRL+SHIFT+B
    alert('Control Shift B');
}else if(map[17] && map[16] && map[67]){ // CTRL+SHIFT+C
    alert('Control Shift C');
}

Edit: That isn't the most readable snippet. Readability's important, so you could try something like this to make it easier on the eyes:

function test_key(selkey){
    var alias = {
        "ctrl":  17,
        "shift": 16,
        "A":     65,
        /* ... */
    };
    return key[selkey] || key[alias[selkey]];
}

function test_keys(){
    var i,
        keylist = arguments,
        status = true;

    for(i = 0; i < keylist.length; i++){
        if(!test_key(keylist[i])){
            status = false;
        }
    }

    return status;
}

Usage:

test_keys(13, 16, 65)
test_keys('ctrl', 'shift', 'A')
test_key(65)
test_key('A')

Is this better?

if(test_keys('ctrl', 'shift')){
    if(test_key('A')){
        alert('Control Shift A');
    } else if(test_key('B')){
        alert('Control Shift B');
    } else if(test_key('C')){
        alert('Control Shift C');
    }
}

(end of edit)


This example checks for CtrlShiftA, CtrlShiftB, and CtrlShiftC

It's just as simple as that :)

Notes

Keeping Track of KeyCodes

As a general rule, it is good practice to document code, especially things like Key codes (like // CTRL+ENTER) so you can remember what they were.

You should also put the key codes in the same order as the documentation (CTRL+ENTER => map[17] && map[13], NOT map[13] && map[17]). This way you won't ever get confused when you need to go back and edit the code.

A gotcha with if-else chains

If checking for combos of differing amounts (like CtrlShiftAltEnter and CtrlEnter), put smaller combos after larger combos, or else the smaller combos will override the larger combos if they are similar enough. Example:

// Correct:
if(map[17] && map[16] && map[13]){ // CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER
    alert('Whoa, mr. power user');
}else if(map[17] && map[13]){ // CTRL+ENTER
    alert('You found me');
}else if(map[13]){ // ENTER
    alert('You pressed Enter. You win the prize!')
}

// Incorrect:
if(map[17] && map[13]){ // CTRL+ENTER
    alert('You found me');
}else if(map[17] && map[16] && map[13]){ // CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER
    alert('Whoa, mr. power user');
}else if(map[13]){ // ENTER
    alert('You pressed Enter. You win the prize!');
}
// What will go wrong: When trying to do CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER, it will
// detect CTRL+ENTER first, and override CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER.
// Removing the else's is not a proper solution, either
// as it will cause it to alert BOTH "Mr. Power user" AND "You Found Me"

Gotcha: "This key combo keeps activating even though I'm not pressing the keys"

When dealing with alerts or anything that takes focus from the main window, you might want to include map = [] to reset the array after the condition is done. This is because some things, like alert(), take the focus away from the main window and cause the event to not trigger. For example:

if(map[17] && map[13]){ // CTRL+ENTER
    alert('Oh noes, a bug!');
}
// When you Press any key after executing this, it will alert again, even though you 
// are clearly NOT pressing CTRL+ENTER
// The fix would look like this:

if(map[17] && map[13]){ // CTRL+ENTER
    alert('Take that, bug!');
    map = [];
}
// The bug no longer happens since the array is cleared

Gotcha: Browser Defaults

Here's an annoying thing I found, with the solution included:

Problem: Since the browser usually has default actions on key combos (like CtrlD activates the bookmark window, or CtrlShiftC activates skynote on maxthon), you might also want to add return false after map = [], so users of your site won't get frustrated when the "Duplicate File" function, being put on CtrlD, bookmarks the page instead.

if(map[17] && map[68]){ // CTRL+D
    alert('The bookmark window didn\'t pop up!');
    map = [];
    return false;
}

Without return false, the Bookmark window would pop up, to the dismay of the user.

The return statement (new)

Okay, so you don't always want to exit the function at that point. That's why the event.preventDefault() function is there. What it does is set an internal flag that tells the interpreter to not allow the browser to run its default action. After that, execution of the function continues (whereas return will immediately exit the function).

Understand this distinction before you decide whether to use return false or e.preventDefault()


I hope this thoroughly explained answer was helpful :)

share|improve this answer
    
I just made a big update to this answer! The keylogger example is more coherent, I updated the formatting so that the "notes" section would be easier to read, and I added a new note about return false vs preventDefault() – Braden Best Feb 22 '15 at 2:12
    
What about when you press/hold a key with document in focus, then you click the URL box, then you let go of the key. keyup is never fired, yet the key is up, causing the list to be incorrect. Also vice-versa: key press/hold in URL box, keydown is never fired, then put focus on document and the keydown status isn't on the list. Basically whenever document regains focus you can never be sure of key status. – user3015682 May 2 '15 at 7:57
    
@user3015682 This boils down to having some faith in the intelligence of your users. There's nothing you can do about the focus thing except to empty the keys_down[] array whenever a function is activated. Even flash doesn't have a solution for it. Generally, focus being taken away is unintentional. But, if your user wants to intentionally dick around with the keys, and manages to break something, that's their own fault. Common sense dictates that they won't do it again, because they would want the webapp/page to function properly, hence why they're even using it. – Braden Best May 2 '15 at 11:14
    
I agree. Your solution is the best considering what browsers give JavaScript. I like how you combine keyup and keydown into one function! I guess my comment was mostly frustration with browsers not giving JavaScript a list of down keys. In GamePad API JavaScript is given the states of buttons pressed so apps don't have to keep track of it themselves, though I'm not sure if GamePad API gives eventListeners for change of state. For security though it should not give access to the list of keys down when not in focus. – user3015682 May 3 '15 at 20:57
    
@user3015682 the "list" is just an array that you keep updated yourself. Other tabs would not be able to access said keys, and if you're worried about key loggers, no amount of js code would prevent an external program from reading your keyboard input. Even if you delete the array, the data is still in memory, and can be read. As for focus, in say, C++, you could detect when the window loses focus and wipe the keysdown[] array when that happens. If there is such an event (unfocus) in Javascript, you could use that to wipe the array every time the window loses focus. This would solve the bug. – Braden Best May 3 '15 at 22:00

You should use the keydown event to keep track of the keys pressed, and you should use the keyup event to keep track of when the keys are released.

See this example: http://jsfiddle.net/vor0nwe/mkHsU/

(Update: I’m reproducing the code here, in case jsfiddle.net bails:) The HTML:

<ul id="log">
    <li>List of keys:</li>
</ul>

...and the Javascript (using jQuery):

var log = $('#log')[0],
    pressedKeys = [];

$(document.body).keydown(function (evt) {
    var li = pressedKeys[evt.keyCode];
    if (!li) {
        li = log.appendChild(document.createElement('li'));
        pressedKeys[evt.keyCode] = li;
    }
    $(li).text('Down: ' + evt.keyCode);
    $(li).removeClass('key-up');
});

$(document.body).keyup(function (evt) {
    var li = pressedKeys[evt.keyCode];
    if (!li) {
       li = log.appendChild(document.createElement('li'));
    }
    $(li).text('Up: ' + evt.keyCode);
    $(li).addClass('key-up');
});

In that example, I’m using an array to keep track of which keys are being pressed. In a real application, you might want to delete each element once their associated key has been released.

Note that while I've used jQuery to make things easy for myself in this example, the concept works just as well when working in 'raw' Javascript.

share|improve this answer
    
But as I've thought there's a bug. If you keep pressed one button then switch to another tab(or loose focus) while still holding the button when you refocus on the scrit it will show that the button is pressed even if it's not. :D – Cristy Mar 5 '11 at 13:04
2  
@Cristy: then you could also add an onblur event handler, which removes all the pressed keys from the array. Once you've lost the focus, it would make sense to have to press all keys again. Unfortunately, there's no JS equivalent to GetKeyboardState. – Martijn Mar 5 '11 at 13:15
1  
Having a problem with Paste on a Mac (Chrome). It successfully gets keydown 91 (command), keydown 86 (v), but then only keyups the 91, leaving 86 down. List of keys: Up: 91, Down: 86. This only seems to happen when letting go of the command key second - if I let go of it first it correctly register the keyup on both. – James Alday Mar 15 '13 at 17:55
2  
It appears that when you press three or more keys at once, it stops detecting any more keys down until you lift one. (Tested with Firefox 22) – Qvcool Jul 28 '13 at 22:10
1  
@JamesAlday Same problem. It apparently only affects the Meta (OS) key on Macs. See issue #3 here: bitspushedaround.com/… – Don McCurdy Feb 6 at 3:01

I used this way (had to check wherever is Shift + Ctrl pressed):

// create some object to save all pressed keys
var keys = {
    shift: false,
    ctrl: false
};

$(document.body).keydown(function(event) {
// save status of the button 'pressed' == 'true'
    if (event.keyCode == 16) {
        keys["shift"] = true;
    } else if (event.keyCode == 17) {
        keys["ctrl"] = true;
    }
    if (keys["shift"] && keys["ctrl"]) {
        $("#convert").trigger("click"); // or do anything else
    }
});

$(document.body).keyup(function(event) {
    // reset status of the button 'released' == 'false'
    if (event.keyCode == 16) {
        keys["shift"] = false;
    } else if (event.keyCode == 17) {
        keys["ctrl"] = false;
    }
});
share|improve this answer

Make the keydown even call multiple functions, with each function checking for a specific key and responding appropriately.

document.keydown = function (key) {

    checkKey("x");
    checkKey("y");
};
share|improve this answer

I'd try adding a keypress Event handler upon keydown. E.g:

window.onkeydown = function() {
    // evaluate key and call respective handler
    window.onkeypress = function() {
       // evaluate key and call respective handler
    }
}

window.onkeyup = function() {
    window.onkeypress = void(0) ;
}

This is just meant to illustrate a pattern; I won't go into detail here (especially not into browser specific level2+ Event registration).

Post back please whether this helps or not.

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1  
This wouldn't work: keypress does not trigger on a lot of keys that keydown and keyup do trigger. Also, not all browsers repeatedly trigger keydown events. – Martijn Mar 5 '11 at 12:53
    
Quirksmode says your wrong: quirksmode.org/dom/events/keys.html . But I won't argue that since I did not test my proposal. – FK82 Mar 5 '11 at 15:48
    
Quoted from that page: "When the user presses special keys such as the arrow keys, the browser should NOT fire keypress events". As for the repeats, it lists Opera and Konqueror as not doing that correctly. – Martijn Mar 5 '11 at 18:05
case 65: //A
jp = 1;
setTimeout("jp = 0;", 100);

if(pj > 0) {
ABFunction();
pj = 0;
}
break;

case 66: //B
pj = 1;
setTimeout("pj = 0;", 100);

if(jp > 0) {
ABFunction();
jp = 0;
}
break;

Not the best way, I know.

share|improve this answer
    document.onkeydown = keydown; 

    function keydown(evt) { 

    if (!evt) evt = event; 

    if (evt.ctrlKey && evt.altKey && evt.keyCode==115) {

        alert("CTRL+ALT+F4"); } 

    else if (evt.shiftKey && evt.keyCode == 9) { 

        alert("Shift+TAB"); }  

    } 
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