Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm thinking about using Zend for my new project. But I'm worried about using too much system resources. I'm on the $20 Linode VPS

Will it be worth it?

share|improve this question
1  
You mean the Zend framework, right? Or the full blown server? –  deceze Mar 5 '11 at 12:32
    
If you consider HDD space you can always take just only parts of framework you need... –  Laimoncijus Mar 5 '11 at 12:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What resources are you worried about? Size-on-disk you can predict easily.

For memory and cpu it is harder. You could say that there is always a balance: If you make a small app, you can probably do a better job to code everything yourself. Any framework will give you overhead. But the bigger it gets, the harder it gets to write good code yourself. A framework will help you, and in the end you will be better off using a framework just because of the better your code will be (assuming you use it correctly).

So it is a really hard question to answer, without specifics. Gut feeling does tell me you would not go too wrong by starting with Zend. I've seen a couple of smaller, not-to-high-end environments using Zend with success.

share|improve this answer

The big question is how much traffic are you seeing?

100 visitors a day?
1,000 visitors a day?
10,000 visitors a day?

I was running a Zend Framework site on a Rackspace Cloud server with similar specs to your $20 Linode VPS. It operated just fine, but I only had maybe 50 visitors a day.

Zend Framework uses an Autoloader so it's pretty lazy in the files that it loads into memory. I've found ZF to be pretty quick for a framework of its size.

share|improve this answer

As the others have said, it depends on the traffic that you're both getting and expect to receive over time. I have a basic vps for one project and it works fine, but that was after standard tuning of Apache and MySQL. This includes disabling unrequired services, adjusting logging and KeepAlive timeout, amongst other variables (Apache) and tuning various caches (MySQL)

There's a lot that you can do to tune Zend Framework - which I'm quite keen on. Check out the talk by Rob Allen from the PHP London 2011 Conference for some great information.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.