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I'm reviewing a certain project and I see that there are many classes with the same name, but with a dollar ($) symbol at the end + increasing number. For example

Class.java
Class$1.java
Class$2.java
Class$n.java
OtherClass.java
OtherClass$1.java
OtherClass$n.java

What does it mean?

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1  
Curious..I have never seen this! – Amokrane Chentir Mar 5 '11 at 12:38
2  
I have seen it only with classes having child classes or obfuscated codes. – Vikas Patidar Mar 5 '11 at 12:42
    
Hmmmm you're right. It seems that this is decompiled project. I tried the same with my project, and got these symbols. Can someone confirm this so I can close the topic?? – sandalone Mar 5 '11 at 12:49
1  
Isn't title sholud also include Java? because I don't think it's only specifiec to Android. – Vikas Patidar Mar 5 '11 at 12:51
    
I've added it. I wasn't sure if this was Android-only thing ;) – sandalone Mar 5 '11 at 12:54
up vote 12 down vote accepted

AFAIK if it's has number it's an anonymous inner class, if it has a name after $ sign it means just inner class.
Edit: More about how compiler handles you can see here

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2  
You're right that it is normally the number of anonymous inner classes, but Av $ doesn't necessarily mean an inner class. A $ is a valid identifier start character, but you should only use $ for "mechanically generated" identifiers. See the java language spec java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/lexical.html#3.8 – Richard Miskin Mar 5 '11 at 19:56

The dollar sign is used by the compiler for inner classes. I thought it would be strange to manually make classes/files with those names though: As far as I know it's a compiler thing.

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