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How can I free only a single node in a linked list? The following frees the whole linked list but I wanted to free only one node in the linked list.

//Here's my code for delete

while(headPtr!=NULL)
{
    temp = headPtr;
    headPtr = headPtr->next;
    if(strcmp(temp->fname, stdfname) ==0 && 
       strcmp(temp->sname, stdsname) ==0  )
    {
        free(temp);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Note you can format lines as code by indenting them four spaces. The "{}" button in the editor toolbar does this. Radek did it for you this time, but try it yourself when next you ask a question. Click the orange question mark in the editor toolbar for more information and tips on formatting. – outis Mar 5 '11 at 13:10
    
Also, when you ask a question, the body should have a better description of the problem than you had originally. Lastly, is this homework? – outis Mar 5 '11 at 13:14
    
Thanks, outis for the tip. Sorry, but I'm just new to this site so I'm not yet familiar with the features of this site. – ccj Mar 5 '11 at 13:34
    
no worries. There's always stuff to learn. Explore the site, you'll find all sorts of interesting tidbits. – outis Mar 6 '11 at 14:01

You first need to know the previous node. Because of that, you need to iterate until you hit the node you want to delete. In that process you need to remember the previous node. Then you need to connection the previous and next nodes, thus "delinking" the node you want to delete.

currentNode = headNode;
previousNode = NULL;
while (currentNode != NULL) {
    if (currentNode != nodeToDelete) {
        // Not the node we want to delete yet,
        // go on to next node.
        previousNode = currentNode;
        currentNode = currentNode->next;
        continue;
    }

    // We've now hit the node to delete and know the
    // previous node. Fix the structure.
    if (previousNode) {
        previousNode->next = nodeToDelete->next;
    } else {
        // No previous node means it's the head node.
        headNode = nodeToDelete->next;
    }

    // The node is now delinked from list. Delete it.
    free(nodeToDelete);
    // Stop the loop.
    break;
}

This is pretty bad performance-wise, which is why there are double-linked lists. There, the whole operations looks like this:

if (nodeToDelete->previous) {
    nodeToDelete->previous->next = nodeToDelete->next;
}
if (nodeToDelete->next) {
    nodeToDelete->next->previous = nodeToDelete->previous;
}
if (nodeToDelete == headNode) {
    headNode = nodeToDelete->next;
}
free(nodeToDelete);

As you can see, no iteration is necessary here as each node knows its previous and next nodes.

BTW, to work these things out (they are pretty basic) it helps to draw a short linked list on a piece of paper. Draw boxes, in each box write the member names (like previous and next) and draw lines from these members to the corresponding other boxes. Then think about what is necessary to do in order to delete the node. It really helps you understand how this works.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, sir, this would be helpful. – ccj Mar 5 '11 at 13:35
    
I don't agree with you on the performance cost of a single-linked list. Apart from the fact that you need one more pointer on the stack, you perform the same number of iterations in both cases! – Gui13 Jun 5 '11 at 21:09
    
@Gui13: No, you do not do the same operations. When you have the pointer to a doubly linked list element you can delete the element immediately, without needing to know anything else about the list at all as the element has all the necessary information. With a singly linked list you need to walk the list until you reach the element to delete, remembering the previous element so you can connect the previous with the next element. The previous pointer of a doubly linked list element completely eliminates the need for this list walking and thus solves the problem in O(1). – DarkDust Jun 6 '11 at 6:16
    
@Gui13: It occurred to me that you are right if you access the list by index instead of node. In this case you need to walk the list until you reach the element, both for singly and doubly linked list. However, with the singly linked list you also need to keep track of the previous node which is an operation that's not needed in a doubly linked list, so a doubly linked list is a tiny bit cheaper here as well. – DarkDust Jun 6 '11 at 7:05
    
That's what I meant. You usually use your list in a storage manner so you don't access the nodes themselves but rather the data they store. In this case deleting a node will involve the same walking - identify node - delete node in both cases (doubly- or single-linked list). The difference being that you keep the previous element in a tmp var for a simple linked list, whereas you access it directly in a doubly-linked list. – Gui13 Jun 6 '11 at 11:45

The head of the list should never change unless the node you're deleting is the head. You should be moving the temp pointer down the list. You also need to fix up the links when you delete a node, note that there are three cases you need to be aware of and the case where it's the first node requires special handling. I'll give you the skeleton for the code, but since I don't know whether your list is singly- or doubly-linked, I'll leave the pointer updates to you.

temp = headPtr;
prev = NULL;
while (temp != NULL)
{
     if (strcmp(temp->fname, stdfname) == 0)
         && strcmp(temp->sname, stdsname) == 0)
     {
         if (prev == NULL) { // head node
            ...
         }
         else if (temp->next == NULL) { // tail node
            ...
         }
         else {  // interior node
            ...
         }
         break;  // stop when done
     }
     prev = temp;
     temp = temp->next;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, sir, this would be helpful. – ccj Mar 5 '11 at 13:35

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