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I need to declare a (typedef'd) structure and a (typedef'd) function reference in pain old C. This is my code:

typedef void (*monitor_calback)(monitor_data*, short int, short int, void*);

typedef struct
{
    int port;
    unsigned char port_state;

    monitor_calback cb_high[8];
    void *cb_high_data[8];
    monitor_calback cb_low[8];
    void *cb_low_data[8];
} monitor_data;

But of course it doen't compile because we don't know about the structure when the function reference is declared.

I have gotten this but it looks kinda messy and is a little hard to read.

struct _monitor_data;

typedef void (*monitor_calback)(struct _monitor_data*, short int, short int, void*);

typedef struct _monitor_data
{
    int port;
    unsigned char port_state;

    monitor_calback cb_high[8];
    void *cb_high_data[8];
    monitor_calback cb_low[8];
    void *cb_low_data[8];
} monitor_data;

Are there any better ways to do this?

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Doesn't look messy to me. The difference is really minimal. –  Jon Mar 5 '11 at 13:29
    
You should add struct _monitor_data; line before monitor_calback definition (in the second code fragment). –  artyom.stv Mar 5 '11 at 13:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can typedef a struct before defining it:

typedef struct _monitor_data monitor_data;

typedef void (*monitor_calback)(monitor_data*, short int, short int, void*);

struct _monitor_data
{
    int port;
    unsigned char port_state;

    monitor_calback cb_high[8];
    void *cb_high_data[8];
    monitor_calback cb_low[8];
    void *cb_low_data[8];
};

This will work fine as long as you don't try to reference the internal structure of monitor_data before struct _monitor_data is fully defined. All the compiler needs to know for your monitor_callback definition is that monitor_data * is a pointer to something so monitor_callback is fine as long as the compiler knows that monitor_data exists.

This sort of construct is the standard approach for defining opaque types in C, you'd just be un-opaquing your type rather than leaving it opaque.

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You could prefer the following, depends on taste tho:

    #define monitor_data struct _monitor_data
    typedef void (*monitor_calback)(monitor_data*, short int, short int, void*);

    typedef struct _monitor_data
    {
        int port;
        unsigned char port_state;

        monitor_calback cb_high[8];
        void *cb_high_data[8];
        monitor_calback cb_low[8];
        void *cb_low_data[8];
    };
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1  
In my opinion this doesn't make the code clearer. So struct _monitor_data is the best choice. –  artyom.stv Mar 5 '11 at 13:36
    
And of course you still have to declare struct _monitor_calback before its use in monitor_calback definition. –  artyom.stv Mar 5 '11 at 13:41
    
nope, that's the point; its not needed. I use gcc's linker and original poster seems to have a linker that does it as well. –  eznme Mar 5 '11 at 13:46

There is no better way because of typedef behavior.

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