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Being new to Rails, I am having a difficult time finding a website or reference that gives a run down summary of Ruby on Rails. I understand MVC, ActiveRecord, and that sort of stuff on a basic level, but I am having a hard time understanding some of the relationships and fundamentals. For instance:

  1. What are all naming conventions I need to be aware of?
  2. How should controller actions be structured and named?
  3. What are the best ways to render information in a view (via :content_for or render a partial) and what are ways I shouldn't use?
  4. What should go into a helper and what shouldn't?
  5. What are common pitfalls or something I need to do correctly from the very beginning?
  6. How can you modularize code? Is that what the lib folder is for?

I have read a number of responses on StackOverflow in regards to this question, but all of them just point to a 300+ page book I need to read, whereas I just want a concise summary of what's important.

Some resources I am already aware of, but do not offer a concise summary of fundamental concepts for new users:

Thank you for any help, references, or guidance you can provide!

P.S. I would like this wiki to become a living document, so please add to it, edit it, etc. as you feel necessary.

share|improve this question
up vote 43 down vote accepted

1. What are all naming conventions I need to be aware of?

db table is plural, model is singular, controller is plural. so you have the User model that is backed by the users table, and visible through the UsersController.

files should be named as the wide_cased version of the class name. so the FooBar class needs to be in a file called foo_bar.rb. If you are namespacing with modules, the namespaces need to be represented by folders. so if we are talking about Foo::Bar class, it should be in foo/bar.rb.

2. How should controller actions be structured and named?

controller actions should be RESTful. That means that you should think of your controllers as exposing a resource, not as just enabling RPCs. Rails has a concept of member actions vs collection actions for resources. A member action is something that operates on a specific instance, for example /users/1/edit would be an edit member action for users. A collection action is something that operates on all the resources. So /users/search?name=foo would be a collection action.

The tutorials above describe how to actually implement these ideas in your routes file.

3. What are the best ways to render information in a view (via :content_for or render a partial) and what are ways I shouldn't use?

content_for should be used when you want to be able to append html from an inner template to an outer template -- for example, being able to append something from your view template into your layout template. A good example would be to add a page specific javascript.

# app/views/layout/application.rb
<html>
  <head>
    <%= yield :head %>
...

# app/views/foobars/index.html.erb

<% content_for :head do %>
  <script type='text/javascript'>
    alert('zomg content_for!');
  </script>
<% end %>

partials are either for breaking up large files, or for rendering the same bit of information multiple times. For example

<table>
  <%= render :partial => 'foo_row', :collection => @foobars %>
</table>

# _foo_row.html.erb

<tr>
 <td>
  <%= foobar.name %>
 </td>
</tr>

4.What should go into a helper and what shouldn't?

your templates should only have basic branching logic in them. If you need to do anything more intense, it should be in a helper. local variables in views are an abomination against all that is good and right in the world, so that is a great sign that you should make a helper.

Another reason is just pure code reuse. If you are doing the same thing with only slight variation over and over again, pull it into a helper (if it is the exact same thing, it should be in a partial).

5. What are common pitfalls or something I need to do correctly from the very beginning?

partials should never refer directly to instance (@) variables, since it will prevent re-use down the line. always pass data in via the :locals => { :var_name => value } param to the render function.

Keep logic out of your views that is not directly related to rendering your views. If you have the option to do something in the view, and do it somewhere else, 9 times out of 10 doing it somewhere else is the better option.

We have a mantra in rails that is "fat models, skinny controllers". One reason is that models are object oriented, controllers are inherantly procedural. Another is that models can cross controllers, but controllers cant cross models. A third is that models are more testable. Its just a good idea.

6. How can you modularize code? Is that what the lib folder is for?

the lib folder is for code that crosses the concerns of models (i.e. something that isn't a model, but will be used by multiple models). When you need to put something in there, you will know, because you wont be able to figure out what model to put it in. Until that happens, you can just ignore lib.

Something to keep in mind is that as of rails 3, lib is not on the autoload path, meaning that you need to require anything you put in there (or add it back in)

A way to automatically require all modules in the lib directory:

#config/initializers/requires.rb
Dir[File.join(Rails.root, 'lib', '*.rb')].each do |f|
  require f
end
share|improve this answer
1  
Very thorough and easy to understand Matt, thanks for taking the time to answer! – iWasRobbed Mar 5 '11 at 17:23
    
very nice answer. – sunny1304 Mar 27 '13 at 10:40

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