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What does it mean to have a using inside a class definition?

class myClass {
public:
  [...]
  using anotherClass::method;
};
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4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

That declaration unhides a base class member. This is most often used to allow overloads of a member function. Example:

class Base {
public:
   void method() const;
};

class Derived : public Base {
public:
   void method(int n) const;
   // Without the using, you would get compile errors on d.method();
   using Base::method;
};
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The case I've seen it:

class A
{
    void foo(int);
    void foo(float);
}

class B : public A
{
    void foo(string);
}

B b;
b.foo(12); // won't work!

Because I have implemented a new foo function in B with a different signature it hides the foo functions from A. In order to override this behavior I would do:

   class B : public A
   {
       void foo(string);
       using A::foo;
   }
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Most often, syntax like this is used like so:

class derived : public base {
public:
    [...]
    using base::method;
};

The using declaration here unhides a member declaration from the parent class. This is sometimes necessary if another member declaration in derived may hide the member from base.

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If anotherClass is a base class that contains a member function like

virtual void f();

and you decide to overload the function in the derived class like

virtual void f(int);

it "hides" f() in the base class. Calling f() through a pointer to the derived class for example, would result in an error, since the compiler does not "see" the version of f() taking no arguments from the base class anymore.

By writing

using Base::f;

you can bring the base classes function back into scope, thus enabling overload resolution as you might have expected it to work in the first place.

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