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I'm new to Ninject so what I'm trying may not even be possible but I wanted to ask. I free-handed the below so there may be typos. Let's say I have an interface:

public interface IPerson
{
    string FirstName { get; set; }
    string LastName { get; set;}

    string GetFullName();
}

And a concrete:

public class Person : IPerson
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }

    public string GetFullName()
    {
        return String.Concat(FirstName, " ", LastName);
    }
}

What I'm used to doing is something like this when I'm retrieving data from arrays or xml:

public IEnumerable<IPerson> GetPeople(string xml)
{
    XElement persons = XElement.Parse(xml);

    IEnumerable<IPerson> people = (
        from person in persons.Descendants("person")
        select new Person
        {
            FirstName = person.Attribute("FName").Value,
            LastName = person.Attribute("LName").Value
        }).ToList();

    return people;
}

I don't want to tightly couple the concrete to the interface in this manner. I haven't been able to find any information in regards to using Ninject with LINQ to Objects or with object initializers. I may be looking in the wrong places, but I've been searching for a day now with no luck at all.

I was contemplating putting the kernel into an singleton instance and seeing if that would work, but I'm not sure that it will plus I've heard that passing your kernel around is a bad thing. I'm trying to implement this in a class library currently. If this is not possible, does anyone have any examples or suggestions as to what the best practice is in this case? Thanks in advance for the help.

EDIT: Based on some of the answers I feel I should clarify. Yes, the example above appears short lived but it was simply an example of one piece that I was trying to do. Let's give a bigger picture. Say instead of XML I am gathering all my data through a 3rd party web service and I'm creating an interface for it, the data could be a defined object in the wsdl or it could sometimes be an xml string. IPerson could be used for both the Person object and a User object. I will be doing this inside of a separate class library, because it needs to be portable and will be used in other projects, and handing it to an MVC3 Web Application and the objects will be used in javascript as well. I appreciate all the input so far.

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About your update, I still don't think you need an interface. In the case you describe in your edit, you need an abstraction around your 3rd party web service that knows how to convert objects returned from the service to new Person objects. Person is simply a POCO domain object, which would normally be reused throughout your application. –  Steven Mar 7 '11 at 16:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your Person class is a short lived object and it doesn't lend itself well to be used for dependency injection. Besides this, it doesn't contain any behavior and is simply a POCO (plain old CLR object). Because POCOs don't depend on anything worth abstracting, there is usually no reason to abstract them. In other words: With the given example. you don't need an IPerson interface. You can work directly with the Person class throughout your application.

The GetPeople method though, could typically be part of a service that you would abstract away using your DI configuration. A service interface that contains the GetPeople(string xml) method however, would probably be a wrong abstraction, because this means you would always supply an xml string. When you have this XML string, would there be any reason to ever parse that XML string in any other way? It would be more convenient to have an IPersonRepository interface with a GetAllPeople() method. A given implementation could be the XmlPersonRepository that uses an XML data source to fetch the people (from disk, database or who knows what).

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Thanks for all the input Steven, I believe I was misunderstanding its use and I've moved away from doing this. I'm now using it just for factories and with a few property injections where appropriate. –  Alexander Kahoun Mar 7 '11 at 21:51
    
@Alexander: You are welcome. –  Steven Mar 7 '11 at 21:59

Do you have more than one implementation of your IPerson interface? (I doubt it since it seems that Person is simply a data object that gets passed around.) Perhaps I'm missing the point of your question but DI is for separation of concerns and abstracting implementation from interface design.

I don't see how DI can help you extract a Person object from a defined XML schema. You're parsing data, not injecting an implementation dynamically. Perhaps if you wanted to parse the XML a different way to compare performance you would create alternative implementations of the class containing GetPeople, but I don't see that as the point of your question.

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All Ninject could do for you would be to get you an implementation of IPerson. It will not parse your XML or other structure. In fact you would most likely lose the object initialization syntax because you would have to go through the ninject kernel or a service locator.

I would suggest a serialization library for what you want to do. I would recommend json.net or .NET's built in XML serialization

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ryber, thanks for the suggestion but I'm not looking for Ninject to parse the XML, rather I'm looking for it to provide the dependency to Person instead of select new Person. –  Alexander Kahoun Mar 7 '11 at 16:13

Normally, I would simply assume anyone with 20k+ rep here probably knows more than I do about this stuff. However, it also seems to me that:

1) Your example is not too far removed from the examples used on the Ninject website
2) Even if 'this' particular example isn't a good one the issue at hand is using object initializers and that could apply to any other number of more legitimate scenarios.

Unfortunately I don't have an answer on how to do object initialization with Ninject, but I do have a suggestion on 'where' to use Ninject that might help (and I realize this post is a year old but maybe this will help someone).

I agree that you should most likely be using the concrete classes in the GetPeople() method because that method is probably part of an implementation that is specific to Person (and is likely in the same assembly and/or namespace). However, when you have something like a form that is presenting information to a user about a Person then I should think it ought to work with IPerson rather than the concrete implementation.

The place you mainly need to use the object initializers in order to take advantage of linq though is in methods like GetPeople where you ought to work with the concrete classes though so I believe you should be able to have the best of both worlds. No, you wouldn't be able to use an object initializer in the form when working with an IPerson, but I don't think that you would ever 'need' to in that way you need to if you want to use linq in the GetPeople method.

Edit: Actually you don't 'need' object initializers to use linq here

If you forgo some syntactic sugar you can rewrite

IEnumerable<IPerson> people = ( 
    from person in persons.Descendants("person") 
    select new Person 
    { 
        FirstName = person.Attribute("FName").Value, 
        LastName = person.Attribute("LName").Value 
    }).ToList(); 

As

IEnumerable<IPerson> people = 
    (persons.Descendants("person")
           .Select(o => 
           { 
               var p = new Person();
               p.FirstName = person.Attribute("FName").Value;
               p.LastName = person.Attribute("LName").Value;
               return p;
           }).ToList();

And you can see how that could be modified to work with injection quite easily.

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