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We have two Entity Framework queries, one with Include one with standalone query. Here they are

        ConfigModelContainer model = new ConfigModelContainer();
        var scope = model.Scopes.Include("Settings")
            .Where(s => (s.Level == intLevel && s.Name == name))
            .First();

        ConfigModelContainer model = new ConfigModelContainer();
        var scope = model.Scopes
            .Where(s => (s.Level == intLevel && s.Name == name))
            .First();
        var settings = model.Settings.Where(s => s.Scope.Id == scope.Id).ToList();

one more case that has same performance as first one (Query2)

        var scope1 = model.Scopes
            .Where(s => (s.Level == intLevel && s.Name == name))
            .First();
        scope1.Settings.Load();

First one runs for 30 seconds, second runs for sub-second. This is so weird, that I have no ideas.

Does anyone know why this might happen?

Edit: Actual TSQL queries run very fast (subsecond)

Edit 2: Here are queries:

First:

SELECT 
[Project2].[Level] AS [Level], 
[Project2].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Project2].[Name] AS [Name], 
[Project2].[ParentScope_Id] AS [ParentScope_Id], 
[Project2].[C1] AS [C1], 
[Project2].[Id1] AS [Id1], 
[Project2].[Type] AS [Type], 
[Project2].[Value] AS [Value], 
[Project2].[Scope_Id] AS [Scope_Id]
FROM ( SELECT 
    [Limit1].[Id] AS [Id], 
    [Limit1].[Name] AS [Name], 
    [Limit1].[Level] AS [Level], 
    [Limit1].[ParentScope_Id] AS [ParentScope_Id], 
    [Extent2].[Id] AS [Id1], 
    [Extent2].[Type] AS [Type], 
    [Extent2].[Value] AS [Value], 
    [Extent2].[Scope_Id] AS [Scope_Id], 
    CASE WHEN ([Extent2].[Id] IS NULL) THEN CAST(NULL AS int) ELSE 1 END AS [C1]
    FROM   (SELECT TOP (1) 
        [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
        [Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], 
        [Extent1].[Level] AS [Level], 
        [Extent1].[ParentScope_Id] AS [ParentScope_Id]
        FROM [dbo].[Scopes] AS [Extent1]
        WHERE ([Extent1].[Level] = @p__linq__0) AND ([Extent1].[Name] = @p__linq__1) ) AS [Limit1]
    LEFT OUTER JOIN [dbo].[Settings] AS [Extent2] ON [Limit1].[Id] = [Extent2].[Scope_Id]
)  AS [Project2]
ORDER BY [Project2].[Id] ASC, [Project2].[C1] ASC

Second:

SELECT 
[Limit1].[Level] AS [Level], 
[Limit1].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Limit1].[Name] AS [Name], 
[Limit1].[ParentScope_Id] AS [ParentScope_Id]
FROM ( SELECT TOP (1) 
    [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
    [Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], 
    [Extent1].[Level] AS [Level], 
    [Extent1].[ParentScope_Id] AS [ParentScope_Id]
    FROM [dbo].[Scopes] AS [Extent1]
    WHERE ([Extent1].[Level] = @p__linq__0) AND ([Extent1].[Name] = @p__linq__1)
)  AS [Limit1]

SELECT 
1 AS [C1], 
[Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Extent1].[Type] AS [Type], 
[Extent1].[Value] AS [Value], 
[Extent1].[Scope_Id] AS [Scope_Id]
FROM [dbo].[Settings] AS [Extent1]
WHERE [Extent1].[Scope_Id] = @EntityKeyValue1

Third:

SELECT 
[Limit1].[Level] AS [Level], 
[Limit1].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Limit1].[Name] AS [Name], 
[Limit1].[ParentScope_Id] AS [ParentScope_Id]
FROM ( SELECT TOP (1) 
    [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
    [Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], 
    [Extent1].[Level] AS [Level], 
    [Extent1].[ParentScope_Id] AS [ParentScope_Id]
    FROM [dbo].[Scopes] AS [Extent1]
    WHERE ([Extent1].[Level] = @p__linq__0) AND ([Extent1].[Name] = @p__linq__1)
)  AS [Limit1]

SELECT 
1 AS [C1], 
[Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Extent1].[Type] AS [Type], 
[Extent1].[Value] AS [Value], 
[Extent1].[Scope_Id] AS [Scope_Id]
FROM [dbo].[Settings] AS [Extent1]
WHERE [Extent1].[Scope_Id] = @p__linq__0

Edit 3:

I was not able to continue tests on same machine. Here are results on faster machine. Here is code and and results:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int intLevel = 2;
        string name = "fb226050-4f92-4fca-9442-f76565b33877";
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
        using (CMEntities model = new CMEntities())
        {
            sw.Start();
            for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
            {

                var scope1 = model.Scopes.Include("Settings")
                   .Where(s => (s.Level == intLevel && s.Name == name))
                   .First();

                Console.WriteLine("Query:1, Iter:{0}, Time:{1}", i, sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
                sw.Reset();
                sw.Start();
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
        using (CMEntities model = new CMEntities())
        {
            sw.Start();
            for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
            {

                var scope1 = model.Scopes
                   .Where(s => (s.Level == intLevel && s.Name == name))
                   .First();
                scope1.Settings.Load();
                Console.WriteLine("Query:2, Iter:{0}, Time:{1}", i, sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
                sw.Reset();
                sw.Start();
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
        using (CMEntities model = new CMEntities())
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
            {
                var scope = model.Scopes
                    .Where(s => (s.Level == intLevel && s.Name == name))
                    .First();
                var settings = model.Settings.Where(s => s.Scope.Id == scope.Id).ToList();
                Console.WriteLine("Query:3, Iter:{0}, Time:{1}", i, sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
                sw.Reset();
                sw.Start();
            }                
        }
    }
    }

Results:

Query:1, Iter:0, Time:2477
Query:1, Iter:1, Time:1831
Query:1, Iter:2, Time:1933
Query:1, Iter:3, Time:1774
Query:1, Iter:4, Time:1949

Query:2, Iter:0, Time:2036
Query:2, Iter:1, Time:1870
Query:2, Iter:2, Time:1921
Query:2, Iter:3, Time:1751
Query:2, Iter:4, Time:1758

Query:3, Iter:0, Time:188
Query:3, Iter:1, Time:201
Query:3, Iter:2, Time:185
Query:3, Iter:3, Time:203
Query:3, Iter:4, Time:217

Edit 4: I rewrote the code using NHibernate:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        var cfg = new StoreConfiguration();
        var sessionFactory = Fluently.Configure()
          .Database(MsSqlConfiguration.MsSql2005
              .ConnectionString("Data Source=.;Initial Catalog=CM;Integrated Security=True;MultipleActiveResultSets=True")
          )
          .Mappings(m =>
                m.AutoMappings.Add(
                    AutoMap.AssemblyOf<Entities.Scope>(cfg)
                        .Conventions
                            .Add(
                                Table.Is(x => x.EntityType.Name + "s"),
                                PrimaryKey.Name.Is(x => "Id"),
                                ForeignKey.EndsWith("_id")
                            )
                    )
          )             
          .BuildSessionFactory();
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
            sw.Start();
            var session = sessionFactory.OpenSession();
            int intLevel = 2;
            string name = "fb226050-4f92-4fca-9442-f76565b33877";
            var scope = session.CreateCriteria<Entities.Scope>()
                .SetFetchMode("Settings", FetchMode.Eager)
                .Add(Restrictions.Eq("Name", name))
                .Add(Restrictions.Eq("Level", intLevel))                    
                .UniqueResult<Entities.Scope>();
            Console.WriteLine("Query:0, Iter:{0}, Time:{1}", i, sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
            sw.Reset();
        }
    }

results are:

Query:0, Iter:0, Time:446
Query:0, Iter:1, Time:223
Query:0, Iter:2, Time:303
Query:0, Iter:3, Time:275
Query:0, Iter:4, Time:284

So NHibernate forms proper collection 10 times faster than EF. This is really sad.

Here is query generated by NHibernate:

SELECT this_.id            AS id0_1_, 
       this_.name          AS name0_1_, 
       this_.LEVEL         AS level0_1_, 
       settings2_.scope_id AS scope4_3_, 
       settings2_.id       AS id3_, 
       settings2_.id       AS id1_0_, 
       settings2_.TYPE     AS type1_0_, 
       settings2_.VALUE    AS value1_0_, 
       settings2_.scope_id AS scope4_1_0_ 
FROM   scopes this_ 
       LEFT OUTER JOIN settings settings2_ 
         ON this_.id = settings2_.scope_id 
WHERE  this_.name = @p0 
       AND this_.LEVEL = @p1 
share|improve this question
    
We're talking EF version 4, right? –  DOK Mar 5 '11 at 17:06
    
@DOK Application is based on .net 3.5. I am not sure about EF version, which one is shipped with 3.5? –  Andrey Mar 5 '11 at 17:08
1  
@Andrey: If you are using SQL servier run SQL profiler and check both queries. You can rerun them in management studio and check their execution plan. –  Ladislav Mrnka Mar 5 '11 at 17:25
1  
@Andrey: What happens if you use compiled query for the first scenario? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb896297.aspx Also what happens if you run your tests in reverse order. –  Ladislav Mrnka Mar 5 '11 at 18:03
1  
@Andrey you could try stepping through/profiling MS's code: referencesource.microsoft.com not sure if they provider .Net 4/EF4 yet... –  cofiem Mar 6 '11 at 8:10
show 6 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you say that the actual TSQL queries run fast, are you talking about hand-coded queries?

Try using SQL Profiler to see what is being generated by EF 3.5. Perhaps this will show why the performance would be so different, and provide some insight into whether and how it would be possible to improve the performance of the first query.

Also, here are a couple of blog posts giving specific examples of how sql generation was improved in EF 4. Even if upgrading to EF 4 isn't an option, they might provide food for thought.

Improvements to the Generated SQL in .NET 4.0 Beta1

Improvements to Generated SQL in .NET 4.0

Edit

Here's the code I used to try and reproduce your results. This is using SQL Server 2008 R2, VS 2010 (no SP1) and Entity Framework 4.0. I had to guess at the schema; hopefully it's close.

To create the tables and populate them:

set nocount on

create table Scopes
(
    [Id]                int identity primary key,
    [Level]             int,
    [Name]              nvarchar(50),
    [ParentScope_Id]    int foreign key references Scopes(Id)
)
create table Settings
(
    [Id]            int identity primary key,
    [Type]          nvarchar(20),
    [Value]         nvarchar(50),
    [Scope_Id]      int foreign key references Scopes(Id)   
)
go

declare @scopeId int,
        @scopeCount int,
        @settingCount int,
        @value nvarchar(50)

set @scopeCount = 0

while @scopeCount < 10
begin   
    insert into Scopes([Level], [Name]) values(1, 'Scope ' + cast(@scopeCount as nvarchar))
    select @scopeId = @@IDENTITY
    set @settingCount = 0

    while @settingCount < 10000
    begin
        set @value = 'Setting ' + cast(@scopeId as nvarchar) + '.' + cast(@settingCount as nvarchar)
        insert into Settings([Type], [Value], [Scope_Id]) values ('Test', @value, @scopeId)
        set @settingCount = @settingCount + 1
    end

    set @scopeCount = @scopeCount + 1
end

Using a console application to test:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace so_q5205281
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            using (var context = new EFTestEntities())
            {
                int level = 1;
                string name = "Scope 4";

                ExecQuery1(context, level, name);
                ExecQuery1(context, level, name);
                ExecQuery1(context, level, name);

                ExecQuery2(context, level, name);
                ExecQuery2(context, level, name);
                ExecQuery2(context, level, name);
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        static void ExecQuery1(EFTestEntities context, int level, string name)
        {
            Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            var scope = context.Scopes.Include("Settings")
                .Where(s => s.Level == level && s.Name == name)
                .First();

            int settingsCount = scope.Settings.Count();

            stopwatch.Stop();

            Console.WriteLine("Query 1, scope name: {0}, settings count: {1}, seconds {2}", scope.Name, settingsCount, stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds);
        }

        static void ExecQuery2(EFTestEntities context, int level, string name)
        {
            Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            var scope = context.Scopes
                .Where(s => s.Level == level && s.Name == name)
                .First();

            var settings = context.Settings.Where(s => s.Scope.Id == scope.Id).ToList();

            int settingsCount = scope.Settings.Count();

            stopwatch.Stop();

            Console.WriteLine("Query 2, scope name: {0}, settings count: {1}, seconds {2}", scope.Name, settingsCount, stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds);
        }
    }
}

The EF model was created using the default settings, and updating the model from the database:

enter image description here

The sql sent from EF for the first query:

exec sp_executesql N'SELECT 
[Project2].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Project2].[Level] AS [Level], 
[Project2].[Name] AS [Name], 
[Project2].[ParentScope_Id] AS [ParentScope_Id], 
[Project2].[C1] AS [C1], 
[Project2].[Id1] AS [Id1], 
[Project2].[Type] AS [Type], 
[Project2].[Value] AS [Value], 
[Project2].[Scope_Id] AS [Scope_Id]
FROM ( SELECT 
    [Limit1].[Id] AS [Id], 
    [Limit1].[Level] AS [Level], 
    [Limit1].[Name] AS [Name], 
    [Limit1].[ParentScope_Id] AS [ParentScope_Id], 
    [Extent2].[Id] AS [Id1], 
    [Extent2].[Type] AS [Type], 
    [Extent2].[Value] AS [Value], 
    [Extent2].[Scope_Id] AS [Scope_Id], 
    CASE WHEN ([Extent2].[Id] IS NULL) THEN CAST(NULL AS int) ELSE 1 END AS [C1]
    FROM   (SELECT TOP (1) 
        [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
        [Extent1].[Level] AS [Level], 
        [Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], 
        [Extent1].[ParentScope_Id] AS [ParentScope_Id]
        FROM [dbo].[Scopes] AS [Extent1]
        WHERE ([Extent1].[Level] = @p__linq__0) AND ([Extent1].[Name] = @p__linq__1) ) AS [Limit1]
    LEFT OUTER JOIN [dbo].[Settings] AS [Extent2] ON [Limit1].[Id] = [Extent2].[Scope_Id]
)  AS [Project2]
ORDER BY [Project2].[Id] ASC, [Project2].[C1] ASC',N'@p__linq__0 int,@p__linq__1 nvarchar(4000)',@p__linq__0=1,@p__linq__1=N'Scope 4'

and for the second query:

exec sp_executesql N'SELECT TOP (1) 
[Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Extent1].[Level] AS [Level], 
[Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], 
[Extent1].[ParentScope_Id] AS [ParentScope_Id]
FROM [dbo].[Scopes] AS [Extent1]
WHERE ([Extent1].[Level] = @p__linq__0) AND ([Extent1].[Name] = @p__linq__1)',N'@p__linq__0 int,@p__linq__1 nvarchar(4000)',@p__linq__0=1,@p__linq__1=N'Scope 4'

exec sp_executesql N'SELECT 
[Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Extent1].[Type] AS [Type], 
[Extent1].[Value] AS [Value], 
[Extent1].[Scope_Id] AS [Scope_Id]
FROM [dbo].[Settings] AS [Extent1]
WHERE [Extent1].[Scope_Id] = @p__linq__0',N'@p__linq__0 int',@p__linq__0=5

and the output:

Query 1, scope name: Scope 4, settings count: 10000, seconds 0.6657546
Query 1, scope name: Scope 4, settings count: 10000, seconds 0.1608498
Query 1, scope name: Scope 4, settings count: 10000, seconds 0.1097625
Query 2, scope name: Scope 4, settings count: 10000, seconds 0.0742593
Query 2, scope name: Scope 4, settings count: 10000, seconds 0.0551458
Query 2, scope name: Scope 4, settings count: 10000, seconds 0.0555465
share|improve this answer
    
check edit please –  Andrey Mar 19 '11 at 17:58
    
@Andrey, I created a Scopes and Settings table, populated with 10 scopes and 10k settings per scope. Ran your first query ( Include("Settings")), and the sql generated looked the same. Ran the code in a windows forms project and it executed in < 1 second, usually around .5 seconds the first time and .3 seconds subsequently. If you're going to give NHibernate a try, you may also want to try EF 4 if you are able. –  adrift Mar 23 '11 at 4:27
    
@adrift could you send me your code to asyschikov@gmail.com ? I will send you mine. I tried with EF 4.0, result is same. I rewrote that piece of code with NHibernate and it is as fast as Query 3. –  Andrey Mar 23 '11 at 11:46
    
@Andrey, I edited my answer to include the code I used. The first query is slower, but not to the extent that you experienced. If your results continue to be different, let me know and I'll email the solution. And thanks for posting your results using NHibernate. I'm using EF now for my current project, but am always interested in the alternatives. –  adrift Mar 23 '11 at 18:28
    
@adrift thanks for code, I will try to reproduce and compare. –  Andrey Mar 23 '11 at 18:38
show 3 more comments

A couple things to check...

  1. How is the relationship between Scopes and Settings defined in the entity model? Are the correct foreign keys used? How about multiplicity (one-to-many, etc.)?
  2. Does your execution time improve if you change your first query to:

.

ConfigModelContainer model = new ConfigModelContainer();
var scope = model.Scopes.Include("Settings")
                 .First<Scope>(s => s.Level == intLevel && s.Name == name);

I don't know for sure that Linq will optimize this query any differently from yours, but maybe see if it happens to do so.

As regards upgrading to EF 4.0, I don't know how feasible that is if your project is in .NET 3.5. Nevertheless, I never had this problem when our projects were using .NET 3.5/EF 1.

share|improve this answer
    
1. Multiplicity is one-to-many. 2. didn't help :( –  Andrey Mar 9 '11 at 12:34
add comment

Can you print results of following?

    ConfigModelContainer model = new ConfigModelContainer();
    ObjectQuery<Scope> scope = model.Scopes.Include("Settings")
        .Where(s => (s.Level == intLevel && s.Name == name))
        .First();

    Trace.WriteLine(scope.ToTraceString());

And see what it prints in both the cases.

If you swap the positions of query, does second one runs faster or slower? If this is the beginning of program, then whenever you run the first query, EF will take time to fetch metadata, validate metadata and settle down. I think its EF's initialization time if you say simple query runs faster.

share|improve this answer
    
check edit please –  Andrey Mar 19 '11 at 17:58
    
Now can you use these SQL against SQL server directly and check if they run faster? –  Akash Kava Mar 19 '11 at 19:54
    
"Actual TSQL queries run very fast (subsecond)" –  Andrey Mar 20 '11 at 12:43
add comment

I'd time the two EF-generated queries to check their exact run times. Maybe you'll find some difference.

The first query is ordered (see the EF-generated query), which should make it run slightly slower than the second querhy (which is not ordered). If your settings are large, then you may be looking at some run time for this sorting.

I also observe that subquent runs (other than the first one) are faster than the first iteration. This is expected because subsequent runs do not have to instantiate all the objects -- they are all created in the first run. But the difference is small, so your performance bottleneck is obviously not with objects instantiation.

You are also disposing the entity context before you try the second query.

So the only difference (other than the first query's sorting) is that in the first query you are duplicating the four fields in Scopes in each record joined with the Settings. Therefore, you have n number of duplicated four Scopes fields where n = number of Settings. As those four fields seem to be small, this shouldn't create the 10x performance difference you measured, although that 10x difference amounts to only 2 seconds.

How many settings do you have for that particular Scopes row?

share|improve this answer
    
Check a look at edit. The program is very minialistic –  Andrey Mar 22 '11 at 13:24
    
See my edit.... –  Stephen Chung Mar 22 '11 at 13:41
    
OK. Back to the drawing board. You are disposing the entity context and creating a new one. –  Stephen Chung Mar 22 '11 at 13:47
    
OK see edit again. –  Stephen Chung Mar 22 '11 at 13:58
    
I have 10 Scopes and 10 000 Settings for each (50k totally) –  Andrey Mar 22 '11 at 14:36
show 6 more comments

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