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I have the following code:

class Engine
  attr_accessor :isRunning

  def initialize
    @isRunning = false
    @commands = ["left", "right", "brake", "accelerate", "quit"]
  end

  def start
    self.isRunning = true;
    while(self.isRunning)
      command = gets.chomp!

      if(@commands.include? command)
        puts "OK."
      else
        puts "> #{command} Unknown Command."
      end

      if(command=="quit") then
        self.stop
        puts "Quitting!"
      end
    end

  end

  def stop
    self.isRunning = false;
  end

end

As you can see, it is pretty simple, however, I am trying to figure out how to invoke methods based on criteria. If I would implement a bunch of methods, like methodOne and methodTwo inside the Engine class like this:

@commands = ["left", "right", "brake", "accelerate", "quit", "methodOne", "methodTwo"]

def methodOne

end

def methodTwo

end

def parseCommand(command)
   if(command=="methodOne") then
   self.methodOne
   end
   if(command=="methodTwo") then
   self.methodTwo
   end
end

could I invoke these methods minimalistically? Right now, I would have to write a big pile of if-statements, and I would rather omit its future maintenance if it can be done more elegantly.

share|improve this question
1  
idiomatic: methodOne -> method_one. if (condition) -> if condition. And, while correct, barely anybody uses "then". – tokland Mar 5 '11 at 19:45
up vote 3 down vote accepted

use self.send("methodname")

You can read more about it in the Docs

Your code could look like:

class Engine
  # ...code ...
  def parseCommands(commands)
    commands.each{|c_command| self.send(c_command) }
  end 
  # ...code ...
end

@commands = ["left", "right", "brake", "accelerate", "quit", "methodOne", "methodTwo"]
engineInstance.parseCommands(@commands)
share|improve this answer
    
Uberawesome! Thanks! – Shyam Mar 5 '11 at 17:17
1  
It doesn't have to be a symbol, it can be a string too. – Peter Brown Mar 5 '11 at 17:27
    
@beerlington, I also thought it could be a string until I had a look at the docs telling "Invokes the method identified by symbol". Although it works using a string... – sled Mar 5 '11 at 17:33
1  
Actually, the "symbol" is the name of the parameter. It can be a symbol, a string, or a string-like object that responds to to_str. I'll see if I can make the doc clearer. – Marc-André Lafortune Mar 5 '11 at 17:42
    
@Marc-André Lafortune: thanks I've erased the symbol part. – sled Mar 5 '11 at 17:50

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