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What would my statement be to insert "Arnold Schwarzenegger" and "Hasta la vista baby" into the following empty SQL tables?

The title of this question was originally going to be "How to insert the first records into SQL tables with bidirectional associations and autogenerated integer PK?" but I wasn't sure if I was phrasing that correctly... Basically, I have two tables Actors and CatchPhrases.

Actors looks like:

  ActorId                  int             NOT NULL  PK (autogenerated by db)
  FavoriteCatchPhraseId    int             NOT NULL  FK
  Name                     varchar(200)    NOT NULL

CatchPhrases looks like:

  CatchPhraseId            int             NOT NULL  PK (autogenerated by db)
  ActorId                  int             NOT NULL  FK
  PhraseText               varchar(500)    NOT NULL

So, Actors can have multiple catch phrases but must have at least one. A catch phrase is associated with an actor. There is currently no data in either table.

share|improve this question
    
indeed captivating title. –  Nishant Mar 5 '11 at 18:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would model it differently to avoid a bidirectional relation (which would be difficult to do). Simply add a column (IsFavorite) to the CatchPhrases table. Either use a constraint or business rule in code to limit the number of catch phrases marked as a favorite for each actor to one.

Actors:

ActorId                  int             NOT NULL  PK (autogenerated by db)
Name                     varchar(200)    NOT NULL

CatchPhrases:

CatchPhraseId            int             NOT NULL  PK (autogenerated by db)
ActorId                  int             NOT NULL  FK
PhraseText               varchar(500)    NOT NULL
IsFavorite               bit             NOT NULL

Make sure that you have an index on ActorId for the CatchPhrases table so you can quickly find the actor's catch phrases.

Alternatively, using a join table -- which would allow multiple actors to have the same catch phrase.

Actors:

ActorId                  int             NOT NULL PK (autogenerated by db)
Name                     varchar(200)    NOT NULL

ActorCatchPhrases

ActorId                  int             NOT NULL PK (FK to Actors)
CatchPhraseId            int             NOT NULL PK (FK to CatchPhrases)
IsFavorite               bit             NOT NULL

CatchPhrases

PhraseId                 int             NOT NULL PK (autogenerated by db)  
PhraseText               varchar(500)    NOT NULL
share|improve this answer
    
Are you saying it is not possible to do as it is? It seems to me that marking the record IsFavorite in a bit field could (1) potentially result in multiple favorites. As you noted this can be avoided in a business layer, but also (2) it doesn't change anything about the catch phrase when it becomes a favorite, it changes something about the actor, so it seems like the actor table should be the one that is updated. –  smartcaveman Mar 5 '11 at 17:36
    
@smart - I'm not a SQL guru, but I don't think you can do it with the tables defined as you have them. You'd need to make one of the FKs nullable and not enforce the constraint so that you could insert into one table, then insert into the other (and get the id), then update the first with the id from the second. I think it's simpler my way. –  tvanfosson Mar 5 '11 at 17:42
    
Both solutions had occurred to me. I'm going to wait and see if someone can come up with a way to do it, but otherwise I will select you. Thanks for your help. –  smartcaveman Mar 5 '11 at 17:44
    
@smart - I see your point, but you could argue it either way. You could still have "Favorite" property on the Actor in your code, but model it more simply in the DB. FWIW, what would you do if you decided that you wanted to model the actor's Top Ten favorite phrases? I'd do it by having a rank associated with the phrase, not by having 10 FKs for the actor. Also, you might want to consider that multiple actors could have the same catch phrase -- it happens. In that case, you'd use a join table (and the favorite/ranking) would migrate there. –  tvanfosson Mar 5 '11 at 17:47
    
In that case, I would create a separate association table that includes a nullable rank field. I also, wouldn't treat that actors with the same catch phrases as a single catch phrase, because, while the text is the same they are different, and the potential associations that could arise might not be friendly to treating them as a single catch phrase. I think the structure of the data in the database should at least aim to reflect the structure of the business objects. –  smartcaveman Mar 5 '11 at 17:52

The rule, namely that the parent record must have at least one child record, cannot be enforced with declarative referential integrity.

"Favorite" is a singular, and therefore FavoriteCatchPhrase could simply be an attribute of the Actor entity, i.e. a column in the Actors table. You could store the text of the phrase. But if you wanted to enforce the rule that the favorite catch phrase must come from a set of bona-fide catch phrases, phrases that have been vetted and acknowledged to be truly "catchy" and not merely some not-so-memorable saying, then you would have a CatchPhrases table and you could have Actor.FavoriteCatchPhrase store the phrase id and reference CatchPhrases table as a foreign key, though more than one actor could use the same catchphrase unless you put a unique index on Actor.FavoriteCatchPhrase.

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Thank you Tim. I think you give a concise explanation of the problem. –  smartcaveman Mar 5 '11 at 20:10

I think you can do this within a transaction, by using a 'dirty read' (read uncommitted).

But its not very nice even if possible.

As @tvanfosson suggested the cleanest way would be to turn off the FK on ActorId column of the CatchPhrases table.

First create a dummy CatchPhrases (set identity insert on) row like:

0 - 0 - 'No favourite catchphrase', 0

Then when you want to insert an Actors row there is a default to use:

(identity) - 0 - 'Arnold Shwarzenegger'

Then set a variable to the @@identity value that the Actors insert will have generated

Then the catchphrase:

(identity) - (variable) - 'Hasta la vista baby'

Then set a variable to the @@identity value that the CatchPhrases insert will have generated and use it to update the catchphrase id in the actors row.

... phew, are you sure this design is right?

EDIT

Well if we can change the design ...

Looking at the relationships, Actors can have many Catchphrases and Catchphrases can have many Actors. So there is a many-to-many design - which is usually refactored using a link entity (MSDN calls this a junction table):

Actors   
  |
-----
| | |
ActorsCatchphrases
| | |
-----
  |
Catchphrases
  • Actors has the Actor Name and Actor details (with no references to catchphrases)
  • ActorsCatchphrases has the ActorId and the CatchphraseId and the boolean as to whether it is the favourite of that actor
  • Catchphrases has the details of the catchphrase (with no reference to an actor)
share|improve this answer
    
No, I'm actually quite sure the design is wrong. –  smartcaveman Mar 5 '11 at 18:09
    
I said the design was wrong, I didn't say you could change it. - Your design is certainly better than what I initially proposed, but my question was to find out how to do it with a design that was apparently fundamentally flawed to begin with. Thanks! –  smartcaveman Mar 5 '11 at 18:52

I might do it something like this:


USE     tempdb
;
CREATE  TABLE
        dbo.Actors
        (
        ActorId         INTEGER IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
        Name            VARCHAR(200) NOT NULL UNIQUE
        )
;
CREATE  TABLE 
        dbo.CatchPhrases
        (
        CatchPhraseId   INTEGER IDENTITY UNIQUE,
        ActorId         INTEGER NOT NULL REFERENCES dbo.Actors,
        PhraseText      VARCHAR(500) NOT NULL,

        PRIMARY KEY (CatchPhraseId, ActorId)
        )
;
CREATE  TABLE 
        dbo.ActorFavouritePhrase
        (
        ActorId         INTEGER NOT NULL REFERENCES dbo.Actors,
        CatchPhraseId   INTEGER NOT NULL,

        FOREIGN KEY (CatchPhraseId, ActorId) 
            REFERENCES dbo.CatchPhrases (CatchPhraseId, ActorId),

        PRIMARY KEY (ActorId, CatchPhraseId),
        UNIQUE (CatchPhraseId, ActorId)
        )
GO
CREATE  INDEX [dbo.CatchPhrases ActorId]
ON      dbo.CatchPhrases (ActorId)
GO
DECLARE @ActorId    TABLE (Id INTEGER NOT NULL);
DECLARE @PhraseId   TABLE (Id INTEGER NOT NULL)
;
BEGIN   TRANSACTION
;
INSERT  dbo.Actors 
        (Name)
OUTPUT  inserted.ActorId
INTO    @ActorId (Id)
VALUES  ('Arnold Schwarzenegger')
;
DECLARE @AID INTEGER = (SELECT Id FROM @ActorId)
;
INSERT  dbo.CatchPhrases
        (ActorId, PhraseText)
OUTPUT  inserted.CatchPhraseId
INTO    @PhraseId (Id)
VALUES  (@AID, 'Hasta la vista, baby')
;
DECLARE @PID INTEGER = (SELECT Id FROM @PhraseId)
;
INSERT  dbo.ActorFavouritePhrase
        (ActorId, CatchPhraseId)
VALUES  (@AID, @PID)
;
COMMIT  TRANSACTION
GO
DROP    TABLE
        dbo.ActorFavouritePhrase,
        dbo.CatchPhrases,
        dbo.Actors
;
share|improve this answer
1  
It seems possible that actor could have a favorite phrase that belongs to another actor with this solution. –  tvanfosson Mar 5 '11 at 18:27
    
Yes - updated to prevent that, I think :) –  Paul White Mar 5 '11 at 19:44

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