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Preface: I am a complete bash noob.

I want to write a simple script to toggle AppleShowAllFiles on my mac.

I am thinking something like this:

#!/bin/bash
#toggle AppleShowAllFiles

if defaults read com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles == TRUE
then
  defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles FALSE
else 
  defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles TRUE
fi

killall Finder

That doesn't seem to be working, but I am sure one of you could bash it out in 1 second flat; please commence bashing and help a lost soul!

thanks.

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a fixed version of your script:

#!/bin/bash
#toggle AppleShowAllFiles

current_value=$(defaults read com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles)
if [ $current_value = "TRUE" ]
then
  defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles FALSE
else
  defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles TRUE
fi

killall Finder

The if syntax of your script was a bit...well, iffy. That's all that needed to be changed.

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-eq is a numeric comparison. Also, parentheses like that are csh syntax, not Bash, etc. –  Dennis Williamson Mar 5 '11 at 19:47
    
Fixed those two issues. For the record, the script still worked before that. –  Carter Allen Mar 5 '11 at 19:50
    
Excellent! thank you so much for that. Is there any reason to first declare that current_value var, or would the following still be acceptable form: if [ defaults read com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles = "TRUE" ] –  James Mar 5 '11 at 20:14
    
I assigned it to a variable for cleanliness. If you wanted to keep in on one line, you need to put the command inside backticks (``) in order for it to work. –  Carter Allen Mar 5 '11 at 20:19
    
Ope.. the commenting stripped my apostrophe of the first part of the predicate. Also.. what is the significance of that strange apostrophe that is wrapping the first part of the predicate? the diagonal apostrophe that is on the tilde key..? Does that evaluate whatever is inside it? –  James Mar 5 '11 at 20:21
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This should work for you:

if [[ $(defaults read com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles) == TRUE ]]
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+1 for showing me another way to phrase the predicate. Helpful for my newbosity. –  James Mar 5 '11 at 20:27
    
@James: It's much better to use $() than backticks. –  Dennis Williamson Mar 5 '11 at 20:32
    
Ahh yes, from the looks of that post it is indeed. It also feels more like what I'm used to from other languages. Thanks for the headsup. –  James Mar 6 '11 at 2:53
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