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In my application I'm using ADODB to query a MySQL database. This goes very smooth, however, ADODB seems to leak a lot of memory.

I fixed it partially by calling the close method of every executed query.
I found out by benchmarking 1000000 queries on this method:

public static int Execute(string query)
{
    Connect();
    object ret;
    lock (_conn)
        _conn.Execute(query, out ret, -1);
    return (int)ret;
}

After a about 10000 queries I was out of memory, extremely fast.

I figured it was because of the _conn.Execute, so I changed it into:

public static int Execute(string query)
{
    Connect();
    object ret;
    ADODB.Recordset rs;
    lock (_conn)
        rs = _conn.Execute(query, out ret, -1);
    rs.Close();
    return (int)ret;
}

Now, this seems to save a lot but it still leaks about 80MB of memory after executing 100000 queries.

Does anyone know how to stop it from leaking memory, I do NOT need the recordset. I have 3 different functions, one for executing like this, one for executing and returning a recordset wrapped in my own classes, and one for executing and returning the last inserted id, useful for INSERT INTO queries.

So, does anyone know how to stop the leak?

EDIT:

This is the code in Connect():

private static ADODB.Connection _conn = new ADODB.Connection();

public static bool Connected
{
    get { return _conn.State == 1; }
}

public static bool Connect()
{
    lock (_conn)
        if (!Connected) _conn.Open(Configuration.DB_ConnectionString, "", "", -1);
    return Connected;
}
share|improve this question
    
What does Connect(); do? –  Sam Holder Mar 5 '11 at 20:14
    
I added the code, including all related things :) –  Aidiakapi Mar 5 '11 at 20:17
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Have you considered using the MySql .Net Connector? Given that it's a managed library which is designed specifically for connecting to MySql, it stands a better chance of not leaking. Also, I've used it previously and not noticed it leaking memory.

share|improve this answer
    
I have considered it, but I never used it, so if you could point me in the right direction with it that'd be nice :) –  Aidiakapi Mar 5 '11 at 20:18
    
@Aidiakapi - I've linked to it in my answer :) Here's a link to some tutorials: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/connector-net-tutorials.html I'd strongly recommend using it as it's better than the "generic" solution that is ADODB. Out of curiosity, why are you using ADODB in .net? –  Rob Mar 5 '11 at 20:20
    
I've used it because I switched from ASP to ASP.Net xD, and I kept a lot of the old codes. –  Aidiakapi Mar 5 '11 at 20:22
    
@Adiakapi, Ahh, that's your first mistake! =) Use what's current, ADODB wasn't designed to be used in .net. That's not to say that it won't work fine but, as you've discovered, it has problems. Use what's provided in .net :-) –  Rob Mar 5 '11 at 20:23
    
Okay, anyways I don't expect many people to reply about this anymore, because I definitely can't see what wrong with the code. So I'll accept your answer, and thanks :) –  Aidiakapi Mar 5 '11 at 20:25
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When working with COM from .Net, you need to explicitly release any handles to COM objects you've used, otherwise they'll stay in memory forever.

System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.ReleaseComObject( obj );

So to rewrite your code:

object ret;
ADODB.Recordset rs = null;

Connect();

try
{
    // Why the lock? Is your code sharing the same connection across threads?
    lock (_conn) 
        rs = _conn.Execute(query, out ret, -1);

    rs.Close();
}
finally
{
    if (rs != null)
        System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.ReleaseComObject( rs );
}

return (int)ret;

You will need to protect _conn in the same way, ensuring you call ReleaseComObject when finished with it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I'll keep it in mind, but I think it's better to switch to the managed code platform for this :), thanks anyways :) –  Aidiakapi Mar 5 '11 at 20:45
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