Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Not sure if the title is worded correctly but here goes:

I have a map class, which contains a vector containing MapEntitys. MapEntity is a class of which Factory, Farm and 3 other classes are inherited from.

These 5 classes both should be "ticked" every few seconds, at which point they will all do a function individual to each class, but only the map class should be able to "tick" them.

How would I support this type of encapsulation in C++? Friends? Should I just use public methods and not misuse the methods? (Although I would prefer proper encapsulation for good practice, even though this code will not be re-distributed)

Again, I realize this isn't worded very well, so please bare with me. Thanks in advance, ell.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Syntactically you could use any of that.

However, if MapEntities are to be "ticked" from outside, the tick method should be part of their public methods. Actually, it should be a virtual public method of the MapEntity class.

And yes, public methods are proper encapsulation. They tell the user of your class what it can do. In this case, the user is the Map class and it can tick MapEntities.

You should consider other solutions (friends, anonymous namespaces etc.) only if MapEntities are designed to be used only by Map.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the info :D. I'l use a virtual public method –  Ell Mar 5 '11 at 22:09

You could use friend, but I think it's better to not put any restriction on what can 'tick' your MapEntity classes.

It's generally considered bad practice to put artificial limitations in your code. Even though you only want your map class to be able to call this function right now, this might change in the future.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this, I thought putting limits on code was the right thing to do :s –  Ell Mar 5 '11 at 22:10
    
No, the reason for using encapsulation is protecting data, not putting limits on code. You normally use encapsulation when you want to protect data, usually to enforce side effects of the data changing. –  dauphic Mar 6 '11 at 0:03

Using friend would actually lower the degree of encapsulation, since your map class would see any privates of MapEntities, not only the tick method.

share|improve this answer

In my opinion your task looks like design-pattern visitor description.

class Visitor;

class MapEntity
{
  public:
    virtual void tick(Visitor &v) = 0;
};

class Factory: public MapEntity
{
  public:
    void accept(Visitor &v);
    // ...
};

class Farm: public MapEntity
{
  public:
    void tick(Visitor &v);
    // ...
};

class Mill: public MapEntity
{
  public:
    void tick(Visitor &v);
    // ...
};

class Visitor
{
  public:
    virtual void visit(Factory *e) = 0;
    virtual void visit(Farm *e) = 0;
    virtual void visit(Mill *e) = 0;
};

void Factory::tick(Visitor &v) { v.visit(this); }
void Farm::tick(Visitor &v) { v.visit(this); }
void Mill::tick(Visitor &v) { v.visit(this); }

class SomeVisitor: public Visitor
{
    void visit(Factory *e) { /* ... */ };
    void visit(Farm *e) { /* ... */ };
    void visit(Mill *e) { /* ... */ };
};

class OtherVisitor: public Visitor  { /* ... */ };

client code:

MapEntity *enities[];
// ...
SomeVisitor v1;
OtherVisitor v2;
for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
{
  entities[i].tick(v1);
}
for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
{
  entities[i].tick(v2);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.