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Does anyone know of any good library that abstracts the problem of path manipulation in a nice way? I'd like to be able to combine and parse paths with arbitrary separators ('/' or ':' for example) without reinventing the wheel.

It's a shame that System.IO.Path isn't more reusable.

Thanks

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I think System.IO.Path works great. Do you have specific tasks that you need that it can't handle? –  Espo Sep 9 '08 at 14:53
    
Can you use Path.DirectorySeparatorChar? –  Ian Oxley Sep 9 '08 at 14:57
    
@Espo: try reading the second sentence of my question. –  Kent Boogaart Aug 23 '09 at 14:51

5 Answers 5

System.IO.Path.Combine will work great for many different types of paths:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.path.combine.aspx

System.IO.Path.Combine uses the current platform standard separators to combine paths. That means on Windows it uses "\" and on unix/linux (mono) it uses "/". Can you give some samples of what paths you are trying to combine and on what platform?

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Afraid System.IO.Path does not help because the separator characters it uses and understands are predefined. As I stated, I need to use arbitrary separator characters such as ':' and '/'. Best I can do with System.IO.Path is convert my arbitrary characters to those it recognizes (such as '\') and then convert back again after. But that is a hacky solution at best. –  Kent Boogaart Aug 23 '09 at 14:50

Check Patrick's library to handle path operations link text

This is the codeplex project

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Thanks - that library looks useful, but it still doesn't allow a custom path separator to be specified. It just uses Path.DirectorySeparatorChar. –  Kent Boogaart Sep 11 '08 at 8:35

You're describing regular expressions! Use that as the underpinning for what you need to do.

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Sure, regular expressions will work and that is what I've used up until now. But they seem like overkill and are unlikely to perform as well as a dedicated path manipulation library. Afterall, System.IO.Path doesn't use regular expression in its implementation, does it? –  Kent Boogaart Aug 23 '09 at 14:49

I can't tell what environment you might be using based off of your separators, but I have never seen a library like this before.

So using reflector and System.IO.Path as a basis it isn't difficult to reinvent the wheel.

  • Create an instance of this class
  • Supply your separator characters in the CTor
  • Optionally change the InvalidPathChars if needed.

This is pretty much the code that is used by the framework so it should be just as fast or only a negligible difference. May or may not be faster than RegEx, it is probably worth a test though.

class ArbitraryPath
{
	private readonly char _directorySeparatorChar;
	private readonly char _altDirectorySeparatorChar;
	private readonly char _volumeSeparatorChar;

	public ArbitraryPath(char directorySeparatorChar, char altDirectorySeparatorChar, char volumeSeparatorChar)
	{
		_directorySeparatorChar = directorySeparatorChar;
		_altDirectorySeparatorChar = altDirectorySeparatorChar;
		_volumeSeparatorChar = volumeSeparatorChar;
	}

	public string Combine(string path1, string path2)
	{
		if ((path1 == null) || (path2 == null))
		{
			throw new ArgumentNullException((path1 == null) ? "path1" : "path2");
		}
		CheckInvalidPathChars(path1);
		CheckInvalidPathChars(path2);
		if (path2.Length == 0)
		{
			return path1;
		}
		if (path1.Length == 0)
		{
			return path2;
		}
		if (IsPathRooted(path2))
		{
			return path2;
		}

		char ch = path1[path1.Length - 1];
		if (ch != _directorySeparatorChar && ch != _altDirectorySeparatorChar && ch != _volumeSeparatorChar)
		{
			return (path1 + _directorySeparatorChar + path2);
		}
		return (path1 + path2);
	}

	public bool IsPathRooted(string path)
	{
		if (path != null)
		{
			CheckInvalidPathChars(path);
			int length = path.Length;
			if (length >= 1 && (path[0] == _directorySeparatorChar || path[0] == _altDirectorySeparatorChar) || length >= 2 && path[1] == _volumeSeparatorChar)
			{
				return true;
			}
		}
		return false;
	}

	internal static void CheckInvalidPathChars(string path)
	{
		for (int i = 0; i < path.Length; i++)
		{
			int num2 = path[i];
			if (num2 == 0x22 || num2 == 60 || num2 == 0x3e || num2 == 0x7c || num2 < 0x20)
			{
				throw new ArgumentException("Argument_InvalidPathChars");
			}
		}
	} 

}
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I'm afraid you'll have to implement a path class yourself, as I did. It gives the following advantages:

  • you can profit from type safety
  • you can override operator/, which makes concatenation easier
  • you can add convenience member functions such as GetParentPath() and GetLeafPart()
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