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is it possible to define a list with a fixed size that's 100? If not why isn't available in Java?

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1  
You can set the starting size of an ArrayList but if you add more elements it will expand itself –  Joe Philllips Mar 5 '11 at 22:22
4  
fixed, or maximum? Do you want the list to not be able to have more than 100 items? And what should happen if add() is attempted? Exception, nothing, or an existing element discarded in favour of the new one. –  Bozho Mar 5 '11 at 22:24
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Aren't these beasts called "arrays"? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Mar 5 '11 at 22:33
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arrays do not conform to the List interface ;) –  Bozho Mar 5 '11 at 22:37
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@Bozho: no they don't but given the limited information available in his question, who knows if he needs that, and they're plenty powerful. If all he needs is some collection to hold 100 items, no more and no less, then he can do well with an array. If not, he needs to clarify his question a lot. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Mar 5 '11 at 23:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Yes,

Commons library provides a built-in FixedSizeList which does not support the add, remove and clear methods (but the set method is allowed because it does not modify the List's size). In other words, if you try to call one of these methods, your list still retain the same size.

To create your fixed size list, just call

List<YourType> fixed = FixedSizeList.decorate(Arrays.asList(new YourType[100]));
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2  
Why will you decorate Arrays.asList result if it is already a fixed size list? –  PhoneixS Jan 16 '13 at 16:54
    
Yea ... the FixedSizeList.decorate(...) is for wrapping lists that are not already fixed sized. Using it here is redundant. –  Stephen C Jan 17 '13 at 0:52

Either your question is misstated, or you have an incorrect mental model of what a Java List is.


A Java list is a collection of objects ... the elements of a list. The size of the list is the number of elements in that list. If you want that size to be fixed, that means that you cannot either add or remove elements, because adding or removing elements would violate your "fixed size" constraint.

The simplest way to implement a "fixed sized" list (if that is really what you want!) is to put the elements into an array and then Arrays.asList(array) to create the list wrapper. The wrapper will allow you to do operations like get and set, but the add and remove operations will throw exceptions.

And if you want to create a fixed-sized wrapper for an existing list, then you could use the Apache commons FixedSizeList class. But note that this wrapper can't stop something else changing the size of the original list, and if that happens the wrapped list will presumably reflect those changes. (IMO, the javadoc for FixedSizeList is woeful. It makes no attempt to document how the class behaves when the wrapped list is changed. You will need to read the source code ... and hope that they don't change the behaviour when you are not paying attention.)


On the other hand, if you really want a list type with a fixed limit (or limits) on its size, then you'll need to create your own List class to implement this. For example, you could create a wrapper class that implements the relevant checks in the various add / addAll and remove / removeAll / retainAll operations. (And in the iterator remove methods if they are supported.)

So why doesn't the Java Collections framework implement these? Here's why I think so:

  1. Use-cases that need this are rare.
  2. The use-cases where this is needed, there are different requirements on what to do when an operation tries to break the limits; e.g. throw exception, ignore operation, discard some other element to make space.
  3. A list implementation with limits could be problematic for helper methods; e.g. Collections.sort.
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This should do it if memory serves:

List<MyType> fixed = Arrays.asList(new MyType[100]);
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will it keep the size to 100 if you keep adding to it? –  fastcodejava Mar 5 '11 at 22:22
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it will thrown an exception –  Bozho Mar 5 '11 at 22:22
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@fastcodejava - you cannot use the add method with a fixed-length list - it already has 100 null entries. Use set to set values. –  McDowell Mar 5 '11 at 22:27
    
It can set fixed size. But when I add the object to the List<>, I always received ERROR UNKOWN, u know why? –  Alex Tran May 31 at 18:47
    
@AlexTran - read the comments. You cannot call add on a list created this way. –  Stephen C Jul 31 at 11:14

Yes. You can pass a java array to Arrays.asList(Object[]).

List<String> fixedSizeList = Arrays.asList(new String[100]);

You cannot insert new Strings to the fixedSizeList (it already has 100 elements). You can only set its values like this:

fixedSizeList.set(7, "new value");

That way you have a fixed size list. The thing functions like an array and I can't think of a good reason to use it. I'd love to hear why you want your fixed size collection to be a list instead of just using an array.

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arrays cannot be generifed. –  Jeffrey Blattman Mar 30 '12 at 1:23
    
My reason's the same as Jeffrey's. Shocked to learn that you cant have the line: T[] myGenericArray = new T[5]; –  Swiftslide Oct 24 '12 at 1:41
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This is perfect. Instead of "String" we have to put the Object class as per requirement.Thanx. –  Debarati Sep 24 '13 at 9:26

Typically an alternative for fixed size Lists are Java arrays. Lists by default are allowed to grow/shrink in Java. However, that does not mean you cannot have a List of a fixed size. You'll need to do some work and create a custom implementation.

You can extend an ArrayList with custom implementations of the clear, add and remove methods.

e.g.

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class FixedSizeList<T> extends ArrayList<T> {

    public FixedSizeList(int capacity) {
        super(capacity);
        for (int i = 0; i < capacity; i++) {
            super.add(null);
        }
    }

    public FixedSizeList(T[] initialElements) {
        super(initialElements.length);
        for (T loopElement : initialElements) {
            super.add(loopElement);
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void clear() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Elements may not be cleared from a fixed size List.");
    }

    @Override
    public boolean add(T o) {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Elements may not be added to a fixed size List, use set() instead.");
    }

    @Override
    public void add(int index, T element) {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Elements may not be added to a fixed size List, use set() instead.");
    }

    @Override
    public T remove(int index) {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Elements may not be removed from a fixed size List.");
    }

    @Override
    public boolean remove(Object o) {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Elements may not be removed from a fixed size List.");
    }

    @Override
    protected void removeRange(int fromIndex, int toIndex) {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Elements may not be removed from a fixed size List.");
    }
}
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If you want some flexibility, create a class that watches the size of the list.

Here's a simple example. You would need to override all the methods that change the state of the list.

public class LimitedArrayList<T> extends ArrayList<T>{
    private int limit;

    public LimitedArrayList(int limit){
        this.limit = limit;
    }

    @Override
    public void add(T item){
        if(this.size() > limit)
            throw new ListTooLargeException();
        super.add(item);
    }
}
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The add(int index, T element) method will also need to be overridden. –  shams Mar 6 '11 at 15:01
    
@shams: That's why I said "you would need to override all the methods that change the state of the list" ... –  Jeremy Heiler Mar 6 '11 at 22:27
    
Yeah, I think handling these two should suffice. The add* are the only methods from the standard interface that can increase the size of the List. I think there are four of them but the other two (addAll*) in turn call the add* methods. –  shams Mar 7 '11 at 3:20
    
@shams: Good point, but I'm not sure I would depend on that, as there is no contract saying that the others must depend on the simple add(). To be safe, I would override all four add methods. –  Jeremy Heiler Mar 8 '11 at 14:51
    
True, but in the ArrayList impl it does use the add() calls and LimitedArrayList<T> extends ArrayList<T> :). In general however all the four add methods will need to be overridden. –  shams Mar 17 '11 at 17:12

Create an array of size 100. If you need the List interface, then call Arrays.asList on it. It'll return a fixed-size list backed by the array.

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Upvoted unexplained downvote. Answer is correct. @Downvoter please explain, otherwise nobody learns anything, except that in this case you are mistaken. –  EJP Mar 26 '12 at 22:55

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