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I am trying to override the default behaviour of an anchor tag so i can load in a web page on my server into the exisiting div, rather than a new tab or window.

so far i have:

myContainer.click(function(){                   
                    event.preventDefault();
                    $('a').click(function(){
                        var link = $(this).attr('href');
                        myContainer.load(link);
                    });
            });

In chrome i have to click the link twice before it does anything, in IE an FF it doesnt work at all and refreshes the page with the new link.

Any help is much appreciated.

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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Shouldn't it be just:

 $('a').click(function(e){
     e.preventDefault(); 
     myContainer.load(this.href);
 });

Your code assigns a click handler inside a click handler. So the first click will attach the click handler to the link, and the second click (on the link) will execute the new click handler.

It seems you only need one click handler. If the links are added dynamically, you can use .live() or .delegate():

myContainer.delegate('a', 'click', function(e){
     e.preventDefault(); 
     myContainer.load(this.href);
});

// or

$('a').live('click', function(e){
     e.preventDefault(); 
     myContainer.load(this.href);
});
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you absolute beauty! works perfectly man! btw whats the difference between live and delegate? –  Julio Mar 5 '11 at 23:51
2  
@Julio: live adds an event handler to the document root (so the event has to bubble up the whole DOM tree) whereas delegate adds the event handler to a certain element (myContainer in this case). So in this delegate example, only click events on links inside myContainer are handled, whereas the with, a click on every link will be handled (although you could also write $('#myContainer a').live(). But as I said, with delegate, the event handler can be bound to an element closer to originating elements. You should prefer delegate over live. –  Felix Kling Mar 5 '11 at 23:55
    
Thanks man! Awesome information. Also for missing the missing the event - schoolboy error!I'm in the process of writing a custom tab plugin for a specific in browser app so this is really useful information. Basically open certain links in new tabs or exsiting tabs, managing the tabs, browser history etc - any tips advice in the realm of this problem? –  Julio Mar 6 '11 at 0:23
    
@Julio: There is no general advice I can give.... just try and search on SO for things like handling browser history the best way. –  Felix Kling Mar 6 '11 at 0:27
1  
@FelixKling That is very good advice. I've often seen developers use .live because "it always works" and they are usually clueless about what's happening under the hood. .live(), .bind(), .delegate() all use .on() internally since jQuery 1.7. It's good they deprecated .live(), it was becoming bad practice for many new devs. –  Pathachiever11 Mar 7 at 17:48
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you forgot to pass in event:

myContainer.click(function(event){
event.preventDefault();
 $('a').click(function(){ var link = $(this).attr('href');
 myContainer.load(link);
 });
 });

try to rearrange them:

myContainer.ready(function(){
    $('a').click(function(event){
    event.preventDefault();
    var link = $(this).attr('href');
     myContainer.load(link);
     });
     });
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hey, thanks for the reply, its fixed the IE and FF problem but still have to click link twice before anything happens –  Julio Mar 5 '11 at 23:40
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