Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm very new to Linq so bare with me. Can I return more than one item in a select? For instance I have a List of Fixtures (think football (or soccer for the yanks) fixtures). Each fixture contains a home and away team and a home and away score. I want to get all the teams that drew. I want to use something like

IEnumerable<Team> drew = from fixture in fixtures
                         where fixture.Played && (fixture.HomeScore == fixture.AwayScore)
                         select fixture.HomeTeam && fixture.AwayTeam;

I know this syntax is incorrect, what I don't know is if it's possible to do this. Would I need two queries and then concatenate them?

Edit: this is really a learning thing so it's not critical to achieve this in any particular way. Basically, at this stage all i want is a list of teams that have drawn. An example usage might be that for a given list of fixtures i can find all of the drawn teams so that i could update their standings in a table by 1 point (3 for a win, 0 for a loss).

Cheers James

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I think you're looking for the Union method as follows:

IEnumerable<Team> drew = (from fixture in fixtures
                     where fixture.Played 
                        && (fixture.HomeScore == fixture.AwayScore)
                     select fixture.HomeTeam)
                     .Union(from fixture in fixtures
                     where fixture.Played 
                        && (fixture.HomeScore == fixture.AwayScore)
                     select fixture.AwayTeam);
share|improve this answer

101 LINQ Samples, namely Select - Anonymous Types 1

... select new { HomeTeam = fixture.HomeTeam, AwayTeam = fixture.AwayTeam };
share|improve this answer
    
Not the answer he's looking for. He wants a list of Teams, not a list of anonymous types with hometeam and awayteam properties. –  Mike Powell Feb 6 '09 at 15:51
    
This is true... i could get round it using anonymous types... just wondered if there was a way to get just a list of teams. If it's the only way it's the only way though –  James Hay Feb 6 '09 at 15:52
    
I agree that this doesn't return a list of teams, but i thinks its better for him to adapt his code to suport handling this anon type. If James Hay could update his question to describe his usuage that might help. –  bendewey Feb 6 '09 at 15:59
    
I think his question already describes his requirement perfectly: "I want to get a list of teams that drew." There are lots of reasons he might not want to use anonymous types here (needing to pass the list outside this method would be a common one). –  Mike Powell Feb 6 '09 at 16:04

An (independant) variation on John Price's solution...

IEnumerable<Team> drew =
    from fixture in fixtures
    where fixture.Played && (fixture.HomeScore == fixture.AwayScore)
    from team in new[]{fixture.AwayTeam, fixture.HomeTeam}
    select team;

You could consider adding "ParticipatingTeams" to the Fixture class to get:

IEnumerable<Team> drew =
    from fixture in fixtures
    where fixture.Played && (fixture.HomeScore == fixture.AwayScore)
    from team in fixture.ParticipatingTeams
    select team;
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for your first query - doesn't require a contract change and is more efficient than the leading answer. –  Matt DeKrey Jun 9 '10 at 21:12

Taking a stab at this myself I came up with the same version as 'it depends'.

Using query comprehension syntax:

IEnumerable<Team> drew =
    from fixture in fixtures
    where fixture.Played && (fixture.HomeScore == fixture.AwayScore)
    from team in new[]{fixture.AwayTeam, fixture.HomeTeam}
    select team;

Using lambda with extension methods:

IEnumerable<Team> drew =
    fixtures.Where(f => f.Played && f.HomeScore == f.AwayScore)
    .SelectMany(f => new[]{f.HomeTeam, f.AwayTeam});

Edit: I don't know if a team could have possibly played and drawn more than once in your database, but if that's possible, then you might want to make use of the Distinct query operator:

IEnumerable<Team> drew =
    (from fixture in fixtures
     where fixture.Played && (fixture.HomeScore == fixture.AwayScore)
     from team in new[]{fixture.AwayTeam, fixture.HomeTeam}
     select team).Distinct();

or:

IEnumerable<Team> drew =
    fixtures.Where(f => f.Played && f.HomeScore == f.AwayScore)
    .SelectMany(f => new[]{f.HomeTeam, f.AwayTeam})
    .Distinct();
share|improve this answer
1  
Last sample worked for me. Also taught me that you can use type inference to declare arrays. Every day is a school day. –  Gusdor Apr 24 '12 at 11:11

Or you can define a type to hold all that data:

IEnumerable<TeamCluster> drew = from fixture in fixtures
                         where fixture.Played && (fixture.HomeScore == fixture.AwayScore)
                         select new TeamCluster {
                             Team1 = fixture.HomeTeam,
                             Team2 = fixture.AwayTeam,
                             Score1 = fixture.HomeScore,
                             Score2 = fixture.AwayScore
                         };

class TeamCluster {
    public Team Team1 { get; set; }
    public Team Team2 { get; set; }
    public int Score1 { get; set; }
    public int Score2 { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer

Edit: Sorry, misunderstood your original question, so rewrote answer.

You could use the "SelectMany" operator to do what you want:

IEnumerable<Team> drew =
           (from fixture in fixtures
            where fixture.Played && (fixture.HomeScore == fixture.AwayScore)
                  select new List<Team>()
                             { HomeTeam = fixture.HomeTeam,
                               AwayTeam = fixture.AwayTeam
                             }).SelectMany(team => team);

This will return a flattened list of teams that drew.

share|improve this answer

I came up against this very issue, and couldn't find what I wanted so I wrote a small extension method which did what I wanted.

public static IEnumerable<R> MapCombine<M, R>(this IEnumerable<M> origList, params Func<M, R>[] maps)
{
    foreach (var item in origList)
    foreach (var map in maps)
    {
        yield return map(item);
    }
}

Following the problem in the question, you would then do something like this

var drew = fixtures.Where(fixture => fixture.Played && 
                        (fixture.HomeScore == fixture.AwayScore))
                    .MapCombine(f => f.HomeTeam, f => f.AwayTeam);

Interestingly intellisense isn't exactly happy about this, you don't get the lamdba expression in the top of the drop down, however after the '=>' its quite happy. But the main thing is the compiler is happy.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.