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Let's say I'm given a void* memory address and I need to print the bits located in this memory address. How can I do this?

In my processor memory addresses are 32bits as are memory values, also int are 32 bits. So I thought of doing this:

unsigned int value = *memory_address;

and then by simple arithmetic (some mod and div operations) to get the bits of the value saved in memory_address.

For example value mod 2 will give last bit of this value and so on. But from what I can tell (I was expecting different bits) it doesn't work. Any ideas why?

Also, is anyone aware of ready C source code that "does" such this, reads/writes bits from memory?

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Please give more indication why you think this doesn't work. –  Jens Gustedt Mar 6 '11 at 8:33

7 Answers 7

Shift the value by one for each bit and or it with 1

unsigned int value = *((unsigned int*)memory_address);
for( int i = 0; i < 32; i++)
{
    printf("%d ", value >> i & 1);
}

You can also do it with math operators. You have to get the bit value (2 to the power of the bit index) and substract that value at each iteration to make sure the modulo doesn't return values that we seen before:

for( int i = 0; i < 32; i++)
{ 
    int bit_value = (int)pow(2,i + 1);
    int num_bit_value = value % bit_value; 
    printf("%d ", num_bit_value ? 1 : 0  );
    value -= num_bit_value;
}
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Well. That seems too work. But Could you explain me, why my idea wasn't? –  Johny Mar 6 '11 at 2:05
int main() {

  int a = 0xFFFF;

  void * v = &a; // v points to a

  int * aPtr = (int *) v; // aPtr also points to a

  int b = *aPtr; // b gets the value aPtr points to, aka a or 0xFFFF

  int aBit = (b >> 3) & 1; // aBit now contains bit 3 of the original a value

  // toggle the bit
  if (aBit) {
    b &= ~(1 << 3); // set bit 3 to 0
  } else {
    b |= (1 << 3); // set bit 3 to 1
  }

  *aPtr = b; // update original a
}
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How about:

bool isBit4Set = ((*someAddress) & 0x8 != 0);
(*someAddress) |= 0x8;   // Set bit 4
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Assuming someAddress is a pointer type, and depending on endianness, maybe. –  Conrad Meyer Mar 6 '11 at 1:39
1  
Well, its name gives it a strong hint that it's a pointer type :) –  Paul Betts Mar 6 '11 at 1:42
bool getBit(void* data,int bit){ return ((*((int*)data)) & 1<<bit); }

void setBit(void* data,int bit,bool set){ if(set){ (*((int*)data)) |= 1<<bit; }else{ (*((int*)data)) |= ~(1<<bit);  } }

for simple usage

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I found it easier to think of the memory as a continuous string of characters rather than a void pointer. This way you can address as many bits as you want.

Here is how I have done it.

unsigned char
get_bit(char *array, int bit)
{
        int byte, k;
        byte = bit/8;
        k = 7 - bit % 8;
        return array[byte] & (1 << k);
}


void
set_bit(char *array, int bit, unsigned char value)
{
        int byte, k;
        byte = bit/8;
        k = 7 - bit % 8;
        if (value)
                array[byte] |= (1 << k);
        else
                array[byte] &= ~(1 << k);
}
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A void* is by definition a bare memory address for which you don't have any interpretation. You should just use a pointer to your favorite unsigned integer type to inspect bits of the corresponding memory. I'd always go with the fixed width types from "stdint.h".

uint64_t *memory_address = ... something usefull ...;
uint64_t value = *memory_address;
uint64_t mask5 = (UINT64_C(1) << 5);
uint64_t bit5 = value & mask5;

You always should use unsigned types for such a manipulation, because for signed types the bit arithmetic gets mixed up by the interpretation of the sign bit.

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Generic solution for printing bytes and bits.

void dump_data(const void *object, size_t size)
{
  int i;
  printf("[ \n");
  for(i = 0; i < size; i++)
  {
    if (i%4 ==0)
    {
      printf("@%02X",&((const unsigned char *) object)[i]);
      printf("[ ");
    }
    printf("%02x ", ((const unsigned char *) object)[i] & 0xff);
    if ((i+1)%4 == 0)
      printf("]\n");
  }
  printf("]\n");

  printf("BINARY FORMAT\n");
  for (i = 0; i < size; i++)
  {
    printf("@%02X",&((const unsigned char *) object)[i]);
    printf("[ ");
    unsigned char value = (((unsigned char*)object)[i]);
    for(int j=0; j<8; j++)
      printf("%d ", (value & (0x80 >> j)) ? 1 : 0); // right shifting the value will print bits in reverse.
    printf("]\n");
  }
}
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