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I have an sqlite database structured as follows:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS Patient 
( PatientId INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT );

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS Event 
( 
PatientId INTEGER REFERENCES Patient( PatientId ),
DateTime TEXT,
EventTypeCode TEXT,
PRIMARY KEY( PatientId, DateTime, EventTypeCode )
);

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS Reading 
( 
PatientId INTEGER REFERENCES Patient( PatientId ),
DateTime TEXT REFERENCES Event (DateTime),
EventTypeCode TEXT REFERENCES Event (EventTypeCode),
Value REAL,
PRIMARY KEY( PatientId, DateTime, EventTypeCode )
);

I insert a Patient with Id #1

then I run:

INSERT INTO Event (PatientId, DateTime, EventTypeCode) VALUES (1, '2011-01-23 19:26:59', 'R')

which works

then I run:

INSERT INTO Reading (PatientId, DateTime, EventTypeCode, Value) VALUES (1, '2011-01-23 19:26:59', 'R', 7.9)

and it gives me a foreign key mismatch. Patient Id is '1' in all cases, and the datetime and typecodes match in the 2nd and 3rd queries. I do not understand what is mismatching, but I'm a bit new to actually defining foreign keys and i do not know what I am doing wrong.

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Can you cite the message in complete please? –  user unknown Mar 6 '11 at 2:50
    
"error : foreign key mismatch" haha.. doesn't add too much does it. I was hoping for something a little more specific, too. –  Damon Mar 6 '11 at 2:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I'm not familiar with SQLite but a little Google'ing turned up this. The documentation says

If the database schema contains foreign key errors that require looking at more than one table definition to identify, then those errors are not detected when the tables are created. Instead, such errors prevent the application from preparing SQL statements that modify the content of the child or parent tables in ways that use the foreign keys. Errors reported when content is changed are "DML errors" and errors reported when the schema is changed are "DDL errors". So, in other words, misconfigured foreign key constraints that require looking at both the child and parent are DML errors. The English language error message for foreign key DML errors is usually "foreign key mismatch" but can also be "no such table" if the parent table does not exist. Foreign key DML errors are may be reported if:

  • The parent table does not exist, or
  • The parent key columns named in the foreign key constraint do not exist, or
  • The parent key columns named in the foreign key constraint are not the primary key of the parent table and are not subject to a unique constraint using collating sequence specified in the CREATE TABLE, or
  • The child table references the primary key of the parent without specifying the primary key columns and the number of primary key columns in the parent do not match the number of child key columns.

I suspect you might be running into #3 in that list.

Also, while other DBs might support using a non-unique index as a foreign key reference, (see answers here), it's a bad design choice in my opinion. I would restructure so that either

  1. Reading.PatientId references Event.PatientId so that the complete composite key from Event is referenced by Reading or,
  2. Add an EventId auto-increment, primary key to the Event table and use that as the foreign key in the Reading table (so that you only have EventId and Value under Reading and you can get the PatientId, DateTime, EventTypeCode out of Event).

I'd suggest #2 so that you can avoid the redundancy of PatientId, DateTime and EventTypeCode in both Event and Reading.

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"not subject to a unique constraint using collating sequence specified in the CREATE TABLE" I'm guessing what might be the problem, the whole compound primary key of each table is unique, but not the individual columns. does that mean i need to go back to the drawing board? –  Damon Mar 6 '11 at 2:58
    
@Damon See my suggested restructuring. I'd go with adding a new auto-increment column to Event and use that in Reading. I'm not entirely sure if #1 (referencing Event.PatientId instead of Patient.PatientId) would fix your problem by indicating to SQLite that you want to reference the entire composite primary key but you could try that too. –  no.good.at.coding Mar 6 '11 at 3:02
    
@no.good.at.coding I tried 1, which kinda makes sense.. but it is still throwing the error. the problem with your second suggestion, is that I want to be able to sync online and that makes it handy to have the patientId everywhere so that everything else can be identical locally vs remotely –  Damon Mar 6 '11 at 3:53
    
nm... point 1 did solve it.. it just hadn't actually saved –  Damon Mar 6 '11 at 4:19
    
@Damon Again, I'm not familiar with SQLite so I'm not sure what you mean by needing to be able to sync online - would you not be able to sync the entire DB instead of each table? I'd imagine doing it per table would cause integrity violations (e.g. the referring table gets synced but not the referred table). As a compromise, if you like, you could still keep Event.PatientId and Reading.PatientId (FKs referring Patient) but add Event.EventId to use as the FK. Also, if you do that, we'd be sure that this issue with keys is indeed the problem - it's still kinda speculation at this point :) –  no.good.at.coding Mar 6 '11 at 4:22

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