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I have a hash like so:

[
  {
    :lname => "Brown",
    :email => "james@intuit.com",
    :fname => "James"
  },
  {
    :lname => nil,
    :email => "brad@intuit.com",
    :fname => nil
  },
  {
    :lname => "Smith",
    :email => "brad@intuit.com",
    :fname => "Brad"
  },
  {
    :lname => nil,
    :email => "brad@intuit.com",
    :fname => nil
  },
  {
    :lname => "Smith",
    :email => "brad@intuit.com",
    :fname => "Brad"
  },
  {
    :lname => nil,
    :email => "brad@intuit.com",
    :fname => nil
  }
]

What I would like to learn how to do is how to remove a record if it is duplicate. Meaning, see how there are several "brad@intuit.com" how can I remove the duplicate records, meaning remove all the others that have an email of "brad@intuit.com".... Making email the key not the other fields?

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2  
Is the a pure Ruby hash or a hash that represents data actually in the database (say, via ActiveRecord)? –  Andrew Marshall Mar 6 '11 at 2:56
1  
why not put validates_uniqueness_of the email field? that way even if you get duplicate stuff in your params, it won't be saved. also put the necessary error catching when saving fails. –  corroded Mar 6 '11 at 2:56
    
It's being created based on a CSV list, where users can input emails to invite friends –  AnApprentice Mar 6 '11 at 2:57
    
@Corroded, can't do that bec I need to take the input and then parse and display the output to the user. The above is after the input has been parsed. I just need to take it to the next level by removing duplicates. –  AnApprentice Mar 6 '11 at 2:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I know this is an old thread, but Rails has a method on 'Enumerable' called 'index_by' which can be handy in this case:

list = [
  {
    :lname => "Brown",
    :email => "james@intuit.com",
    :fname => "James"
  },
  {
    :lname => nil,
    :email => "brad@intuit.com",
    :fname => nil
  },
  {
    :lname => "Smith",
    :email => "brad@intuit.com",
    :fname => "Brad"
  },
  {
    :lname => nil,
    :email => "brad@intuit.com",
    :fname => nil
  },
  {
    :lname => "Smith",
    :email => "brad@intuit.com",
    :fname => "Brad"
  },
  {
    :lname => nil,
    :email => "brad@intuit.com",
    :fname => nil
  }
]

Now you can get the unique rows as follows:

list.index_by {|r| r[:email]}.values

To merge the rows with the same email id.

list.group_by{|r| r[:email]}.map do |k, v|
  v.inject({}) { |r, h| r.merge(h){ |key, o, n| o || n } }
end

Custom but efficient method:

list.inject({}) do |r, h| 
  (r[h[:email]] ||= {}).merge!(h){ |key, old, new| old || new }
  r
end.values
share|improve this answer

In Ruby 1.9.2, Array#uniq will accept a block paramater which it will use when comparing your objects:

arrays.uniq { |h| h[:email] }
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shoot I'm not on ruby 1.9.2 –  AnApprentice Mar 6 '11 at 3:19
    
@AnApprentice You can use the backports gem and require 'backports/1.9.2/array/uniq'. –  Marc-André Lafortune Mar 23 '13 at 17:39

If you're putting this directly into the database, just use validates_uniqueness_of :email in your model. See the documentation for this.

If you need to remove them from the actual hash before being used then do:

emails = []  # This is a temporary array, not your results. The results are still in my_array
my_array.delete_if do |item|
  if emails.include? item[:email]
    true
  else
    emails << item[:email]
    false
  end
end

UPDATE:

This will merge the contents of duplicate entries

merged_list = {}
my_array.each do |item|
  if merged_list.has_key? item[:email]
    merged_list[item.email].merge! item
  else
    merged_list[item.email] = item
  end
end
my_array = merged_list.collect { |k, v| v }
share|improve this answer
    
thanks but how would this work. I don't want to lose all the other information. I want to take the hash above and remove the duplicates while retaining fname and lname. –  AnApprentice Mar 6 '11 at 3:07
2  
So you actually want to merge the entries with the same email address? That's different than removing duplicates, which is what you asked for. –  Andrew Marshall Mar 6 '11 at 3:10
    
not merge just remove any duplicate's based on a key of email. It can be unintelligent and just take the firs brad@intuit.com and then remove the rest if any duplicates based solely on the email exists. –  AnApprentice Mar 6 '11 at 3:19
1  
That is exactly what my original code does. –  Andrew Marshall Mar 6 '11 at 3:21
    
ok my apologies. Just tried the first code snippet. It errors with "undefined method `<<' for {}:Hash" –  AnApprentice Mar 6 '11 at 3:34

Ok, this (delete duplicates) is what you asked for:

a.sort_by { |e| e[:email] }.inject([]) { |m,e| m.last.nil? ? [e] : m.last[:email] == e[:email] ? m : m << e }

But I think this (merge values) is what you want:

a.sort_by { |e| e[:email] }.inject([]) { |m,e| m.last.nil? ? [e] : m.last[:email] == e[:email] ? (m.last.merge!(e) { |k,o,n| o || n }; m) : m << e }

Perhaps I'm stretching the one-liner idea a bit unreasonably, so with different formatting and a test case:

Aiko:so ross$ cat mergedups
require 'pp'

a = [{:fname=>"James", :lname=>"Brown", :email=>"james@intuit.com"},
     {:fname=>nil,     :lname=>nil,     :email=>"brad@intuit.com"},
     {:fname=>"Brad",  :lname=>"Smith", :email=>"brad@intuit.com"},
     {:fname=>nil,     :lname=>nil,     :email=>"brad@intuit.com"},
     {:fname=>"Brad",  :lname=>"Smith", :email=>"brad@intuit.com"},
     {:fname=>"Brad",  :lname=>"Smith", :email=>"brad@intuit.com"}]

pp(
  a.sort_by { |e| e[:email] }.inject([]) do |m,e|
    m.last.nil? ? [e] :
      m.last[:email] == e[:email] ? (m.last.merge!(e) { |k,o,n| o || n }; m) :
        m << e
  end
)
Aiko:so ross$ ruby mergedups
[{:email=>"brad@intuit.com", :fname=>"Brad", :lname=>"Smith"},
 {:email=>"james@intuit.com", :fname=>"James", :lname=>"Brown"}]
share|improve this answer
    
That's snazzy only wish I knew how it did what it's doing. For extra points a little commenting –  AnApprentice Mar 6 '11 at 3:38
    
What exactly does .inject([]) do? –  Andrew Marshall Mar 6 '11 at 3:38
2  
@AnApprentice: sure, no problem. #inject is a method in Enumerable which is implemented by Array. In this form, it loops over the array yielding a memo and element object to the block, which returns the memo for the next iteration. So, after the sort_by, I just compare each hash with the last one in the latest memo and merge the fields if the emails match, otherwise I just tack the element onto the end of the memo, which ultimately is what inject will return as the value of the expression. –  DigitalRoss Mar 6 '11 at 3:41
2  
@Andrew, the [] is the initial value of the memo object that my expression is accumulating. Ultimately it will be the new array with the merged hash elements and will be returned by the last "iteration" of #inject. #inject isn't hugely different from plain old #each, it just returns a value and also accumulates that value for you by yielding it with each element to the block as it iterates. –  DigitalRoss Mar 6 '11 at 3:43
1  

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