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I have an array of hashes. Each hash has an uses key. Multiple hashes can share the same uses value.

[{uses => 0},{uses => 1},{uses => 2},{uses => 1},{uses => 0},{uses => 1},{uses => 3}]

How can I generate an array of the most frequent uses values, in a descending order?

[1,0,2,3]
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Referencing this discussion of frequency of items in a list, we can easily modify this for your task.

> unsorted = [{:uses=>0}, {:uses=>1}, {:uses=>2}, {:uses=>1}, {:uses=>0}, {:uses=>1}, {:uses=>3}].map{|h| h[:uses]}
> sorted = unsorted.uniq.sort_by{|u| unsorted.grep(u).size}.reverse
 => [1, 0, 2, 3] 
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ok (for being so compact) for small inputs, but the algorithm looks very inefficient. And it was my understanding that the input was just an example and the hashes had more info (so uniq won't do) –  tokland Mar 6 '11 at 18:39
    
I agree that a more interesting question would be, "What is the most efficient way of doing this?" –  jdl Mar 6 '11 at 19:38
hs.inject({}) do |histogram, h|
  histogram.merge(h[:uses] => (histogram[h[:uses]] || 0) + 1)
end.sort_by { |k, v| -v }.map { |k, v| k }
# => [1, 0, 2, 3]

I always recommend to use Facets, though:

http://rubyworks.github.com/facets/doc/api/core/Enumerable.html

hs.frequency.sort_by { |k, v| -v }.map { |k, v| k }
# => [1, 0, 2, 3]
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+1 for facets. I haven't seen that project before. –  jdl Mar 6 '11 at 19:39

Here is a one pass solution:

a = [{:uses => 0},{:uses => 1},{:uses => 2},{:uses => 1},{:uses => 0},
  {:uses => 1},{:uses => 3}]

# A hash with the frequency count is formed in one iteration of the array
# followed by the reverse sort and extraction

a.inject(Hash.new(0)) { |h, v| h[v[:uses]] += 1;h}.
  sort{|x, y| x <=> y}.map{|kv| kv[0]}
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