Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a class called Cal and it's .cpp and .h counterpart

Headerfile has

class Cal {
    private:
        int wa[2][2];

    public:
        void do_cal();
};

.cpp file has

#include "Cal.h"
void Cal::do_cal() {
   print(wa) // where print just itterates and prints the elements in wa
}

My question is how do I initialize the array wa ? I just can't seem to get it to work.

I tried with :

int wa[2][2] = {
                {5,2},
                {7,9}
               };

in the header file but I get errors saying I cant do so as it's against iso..something.

Tried also to initialize the array wa in the constructor but that didnt work either.. What am I missing ?

Thanks

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If it can be static, you can initialize it in your .cpp file. Add the static keyword in the class declaration:

class Cal {
    private:
        static int wa[2][2];
    public:
        void do_cal();
};

and at file scope in the .cpp file add:

#include "Cal.h"
int Cal::wa[2][2] = { {5,2}, {7,9} };
void Cal::do_cal() {
   print(wa) // where print just itterates and prints the elements in wa
}

If you never change it, this would work well (along with making it const). You only get one that's shared with each instance of your class though.

share|improve this answer

You cannot initialize array elements in a class declaration. I recently tried to find a way to do just that. From what I learned, you have to do it in your initialize function, one element at a time.

Cal::Cal{
   wa[0][0] = 5;
   wa[0][1] = 2;
   wa[1][0] = 7;
   wa[1][1] = 9;
}

It's possible (and probable) that there's a much better way to do this, but from my research last week, this is how to do it with a multi dimensional array. I'm interested if anyone has a better method.

share|improve this answer

You can't do it easily. If you don't want to specify each element individually like in Perchik's answer, you can create one static array and memcpy that (which will probably be faster for non-trivial array sizes):

namespace
{
    const int default_wa[2][2] = {{5, 2}, {7, 9}};
}

Cal::Cal
{
    memcpy(&wa[0][0], &default_wa[0][0], sizeof(wa));
}
share|improve this answer
    
memcpy is dangerous here. If someone in the future changes the dimensions or type of one array without reflecting those changes in the other... –  Mark Ransom Feb 6 '09 at 16:24
    
True, but you'd have the same problem with any other solution. You could easily throw in an assert(sizeof(wa) == sizeof(default_wa)) here to protect against that in this case. –  Adam Rosenfield Feb 6 '09 at 16:29
    
You can make sure that the array sizes always match if you define them like this: int default_wa[][2] = {{ 5, 2 }, { 7, 9 }}; int wa[count(default_wa)][count(default_wa[0])]; with #define count(ARRAY) ((sizeof (ARRAY))/(sizeof (ARRAY[0]))) –  Christoph Feb 6 '09 at 16:41
    
Good point Christoph, I've done that before. I hate #defining count() every time I need it - should have been a built-in feature. –  Mark Ransom Feb 6 '09 at 19:06
    
Should also point out that you can use a static within the constructor, rather than putting the defaults in a namespace outside. But only if you don't need an inline constructor. It enhances the readability. –  Mark Ransom Feb 6 '09 at 19:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.