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I find that when I position an element fixed, it doesn't matter if the parent is positioned relative or not, it will position fixed, relative to the window?

CSS

#wrapper { width: 300px; background: orange; margin: 0 auto; position: relative; }
#feedback { position: fixed; right: 0; top: 120px; }

HTML

<div id="wrapper">
    ...
    <a id="feedback" href="#">Feedback</a>
</div>

http://jsbin.com/ibesa3

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Right answer is here stackoverflow.com/questions/4962266/… –  Soyoes Apr 17 '13 at 10:50
1  
My answer, your chosen answer, is getting extremely downvoted. Could you update your question, or choose a different answer to be your selected answer? :) –  DuckMaestro May 20 '13 at 8:12
    
possible duplicate of Fixed Position but Relative to Container –  Monk Jul 12 '13 at 18:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Since I'm getting bombarded with downvotes-- let me provide both answers to both possible questions. Note that your existing title (and original post) ask a question different than what you seek in your edit and subsequent comment.


To position an element "fixed" relative to a parent element, you want position:absolute on the child element, and any position mode other than the default or static on your parent element.

For example:

#parentDiv { position:relative; }
#childDiv { position:absolute; left:50px; top:20px; }

This will position childDiv element 50 pixels left and 20 pixels down relative to parentDiv's position.


To position an element "fixed" relative to the window, you want position:fixed, and can use top:, left:, right:, and bottom: to position as you see fit.

For example:

#yourDiv { position:fixed; bottom:40px; right:40px; }

This will position yourDiv fixed relative to the web browser window, 40 pixels from the bottom edge and 40 pixels from the right edge.

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5  
oh, hmm... I actually want to mimic a sticky button, when its positioned absolute, when I scroll down, it doesn't sticky ... hmm –  Jiew Meng Mar 6 '11 at 10:49
3  
@jiewmeng wants his child element to be "fixed" meaning that when you scroll down the child would still be visible and in the same spot on the screen. –  Web_Designer Jun 25 '11 at 5:33
2  
Been looking for this for a month or so, this is the first time it was actually explained beyond "use absolute and fixed" or some nonsense. +1 –  tkbx Dec 22 '12 at 17:29
3  
@Will take that up with the OP who chose it as his answer. Apparently he made edits to his question at some stage later. I'm not in a hurry to delete this answer, since there are still people out there apparently finding it useful (8 upvotes), and is an answer to the title of the question. The OP should pick a different accepted answer if a different one is now the better answer. –  DuckMaestro Feb 22 '13 at 19:45
1  
@DuckMaestro I agree! –  Will Feb 22 '13 at 20:30

The CSS specification requires that position:fixed be anchored to the viewport, not the containing positioned element.

If you must specify your coordinates relative to a parent, you will have to use JavaScript to find the parent's position relative to the viewport first, then set the child (fixed) element's position accordingly.

DISCOURAGED ALTERNATIVE: WebKit (Chrome, Safari, iOS browsers, and a few others) have -webkit-sticky which limits an element to be positioned within both it’s container and the viewport. Per the commit message:

-webkit-sticky ... constrains an element to be positioned inside the intersection of its container box, and the viewport.

A stickily positioned element behaves like position:relative (space is reserved for it in-flow), but with an offset that is determined by the sticky position. Changed isInFlowPositioned() to cover relative and sticky.

Depending on your design goals, this behavior may be helpful in some cases. But it is experimental, and not close to a standard yet. And since it requires experimental flags in Chrome anyway, -webkit-sticky isn't really a solution for now.

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10  
This answer should be accepted. The other one is false. –  rayfranco Aug 20 '12 at 20:17
4  
@rayfranco: DuckMaestro's answer isn't false really—it just doesn't exactly answer the op's question. Well, it answers his original question assuming the op only needs relative. But when op clarified in comments he does indeed want position:fixed and position:relative characteristics combined, then this answer becomes a little more helpful. –  Jon Adams Aug 21 '12 at 19:54
2  
@Jon, you can actually see the edit history if you click the date-time after the post's "edited" note. –  JohnK Sep 19 '12 at 22:15
1  
@JohnK I know. By "changed his design" I meant the final code the op used on the site — not a change to the question asked here. –  Jon Adams Sep 20 '12 at 1:17
5  
This is not a good solution, -webkit-sticky is no longer supported by Chrome (unless you enable the experimental flag). It may come back at some point, but until it's officially supported, best to use Grawl's solution. –  Monk Jul 12 '13 at 18:07

first, set position: fixed and left: 50%, and second — now your start is a center and you can set new position with margin.

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4  
This is actually problem solving answer. –  Frodik Feb 24 '13 at 10:28
    
This worked perfectly for me! –  arlomedia May 2 '13 at 18:06
    
Be very careful with this approach! If the fixed element isn't in the viewport it won't work as expected. This fiddle demonstrates the issue if the viewport is too short. jsbin.com/igolur/4/edit –  Bill Criswell Jul 2 '13 at 18:14
1  
Best solution until sticky is better supported in more browsers. –  Monk Jul 12 '13 at 18:11
    
i agree, really a good solution –  Ron Dec 4 '13 at 10:44

Here is an example of Jon Adams suggestion above in order to fix a div (toolbar) to the right hand side of your page element using jQuery. The idea is to find the distance from the right hand side of the viewport to the right hand side of the page element and to keep the right hand side of the toolbar there!

HTML

<div id="pageElement"></div>
<div id="toolbar"></div>

CSS

#toolbar {
    position: fixed;
}
....

jQuery

function placeOnRightHandEdgeOfElement(toolbar, pageElement) {
    $(toolbar).css("right", $(window).scrollLeft() + $(window).width()
    - $(pageElement).offset().left
    - parseInt($(pageElement).css("borderLeftWidth"),10)
    - $(pageElement).width() + "px");
}
$(document).ready(function() {
    $(window).resize(function() {
        placeOnRightHandEdgeOfElement("#toolbar", "#pageElement");
    });
    $(window).scroll(function () { 
        placeOnRightHandEdgeOfElement("#toolbar", "#pageElement");
    });
    $("#toolbar").resize();
});
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4  
jQuery? for layout? are you mad? –  Grawl Jan 21 at 8:14
1  
@Grawl ..JQuery was born out of dealing with the madness! As CSS matures and browser compliance grow I hope you will be correct. –  KXL Jun 25 at 13:58

I know this is an older post, but I think a good example of what Jiew Meng was trying to do can already be found on this site. Check out the side menu located here: http://stackoverflow.com/faq#questions. Looking at it without getting into it too deep, I can tell javascript attaches a fixed position once the scrolling hits below the anchor tag and removes the fixed positioning if the scrolling goes above that same anchor tag. Hopefully, that will get someone started in the right direction.

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digging on live examples is good, yep –  Grawl Jan 21 at 8:14

You need to create a div with position:relative, insert in that div in your container width position:absolute, left:0px and top:0px; and insert a button with position:relative and top and left as you need. Button will behave as it is positioned fixed.

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1  
This isn't quite right, a true fixed element will remain in the viewport while scrolling, whilst an absolutely positioned element will scroll with the with the parent element. –  Simon May 24 '13 at 19:31

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