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Say I have a line in a file "This is perhaps the easiest place to add new functionality." and I want to grep two words close to each other. I do

grep -ERHn "\beasiest\W+(?:\w+\W+){1,6}?place\b" *

that works and gives me the line. But when I do

grep -ERHn "\beasiest\W+(?:\w+\W+){1,10}?new\b" *

it fails, defeating the whole point of the {1,10}? This one is listed in the regular-expression.info site and also a couple of Regex books. Though they do not describe it with grep but that should not matter.

Update

I put the regex into a python script. Works, but doesn't have the nice grep -C thing ...

#!/usr/bin/python
import re
import sys
import os

word1 = sys.argv[1]
word2 = sys.argv[2]
dist = sys.argv[3]
regex_string = (r'\b(?:' 
    + word1  
    + r'\W+(?:\w+\W+){0,'
    + dist
    + '}?'
    + word2 
    + r'|'
    + word2
    + r'\W+(?:\w+\W+){0,'
            + dist
    + '}?'
    + word1
    + r')\b')

regex = re.compile(regex_string)


def findmatches(PATH):
for root, dirs, files in os.walk(PATH):
    for filename in files:
        fullpath = os.path.join(root,filename)

        with open(fullpath, 'r') as f:
            matches = re.findall(regex, f.read())
            for m in matches:
                print "File:",fullpath,"\n\t",m

if __name__ == "__main__":  
    findmatches(sys.argv[4])    

Calling it as

python near.py charlie winning 6 path/to/charlie/sheen

works for me.

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2 Answers 2

Do you really need the look ahead structure? Maybe this is enough:

grep -ERHn "\beasiest\W+(\w+\W+){1,10}new\b" * 

Here is what I get:

echo "This is perhaps the easiest place to add new functionality." | grep -EHn "\beasiest\W+(\w+\W+){1,10}new\b"

(standard input):1:This is perhaps the easiest place to add new functionality.

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grep does not support the non-capturing groups of Python regular expressions. When you write something like (?:\w+\W+), you are asking grep to match a question mark ? followed by a colon : followed by one or more word chars \w+ followed by one or more non-word chars \W+. ? is a special character for grep regexes, for sure, but since it is following the beginning of a group, it is automatically escaped (in the same way that the regex [?] matches the question mark).

Let us test it? I have the following file:

$ cat file
This is perhaps the easiest place to add new functionality.

grep does not match it with the expression you used:

$ grep -ERHn "\beasiest\W+(?:\w+\W+){1,10}?new\b" file

Then, I created the following file:

$ cat file2
This is perhaps the easiest ?:place ?:to ?:add new functionality.

Note that each word is preceded by ?:. In this case, your expression matches the file:

$ grep -ERHn "\beasiest\W+(?:\w+\W+){1,10}?new\b" file2
file2:1:This is perhaps the easiest ?:place ?:to ?:add new functionality.

The solution is to remove the ?: of the expression:

$ grep -ERHn "\beasiest\W+(\w+\W+){1,10}?new\b" file
file:1:This is perhaps the easiest place to add new functionality.

Since you do not even need a non-capturing group (at least as far as I've seen) it does not bear any problem.

Bonus point: you can simplify your expression changing {1,10} to {0,10} and removing the following ?:

$ grep -ERHn "\beasiest\W+(\w+\W+){0,10}new\b" file
file:1:This is perhaps the easiest place to add new functionality.
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