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// A single blog entry
public class BlogEntry
{
    public string ID;
    public string Title;
    public string Entry;
    public DateTime Date;
    public int UserID;

    // Load an entry based on ID
    public BlogEntry(int EntryID)
    {
        DataClassesDataContext db = new DataClassesDataContext();
        var q = (from Blog in db.tblBlogEntries where Blog.ID == EntryID select Blog).Single();

        // Fill data
        this.ID = EntryID;
        this.Title = q.title;
        this.Entry = q.entry;
        this.Date = (DateTime)q.date;
        this.UserID = (int)q.userID;
    }
}

this.ID = EntryID is throwing the error:

Cannot implicity turn type 'string' to 'int'

I'm baffled, because they are both defined as integers, quite explicitly!

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Are you sure it's not "Operator '==' cannot be applied to operands of type 'string' and 'int'" on where Blog.ID == EntryID? – R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 6 '11 at 13:57
up vote 4 down vote accepted

In your class definition, ID is defined as String

 public string ID;

and you are trying to assing an int. That's why.

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Momentary blindness?

public string ID;
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But shouldn't the error message be different? After all he's trying to convert an int to a string implicitly and not the other way round. – CodesInChaos Mar 6 '11 at 14:01
1  
@CodeInChaos: the error message is different; the OP was probably quoting from memory and made a mistake. – Jon Mar 6 '11 at 14:05

You've got 'ID' defined at class level as a string.

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Your class says string ID.
You can't put an int into that.

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this.ID is defined as string, and EntryID is the integer parameter. That code won't work.

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Ummm.. no they are not ID is string and UserId is an int

public string ID;
public int UserID;
share|improve this answer
    
DOH im so stupid sometimes – Tom Gullen Mar 6 '11 at 13:56
    
yeah happens some times with all of us..^_^... – Shekhar_Pro Mar 6 '11 at 13:56

A very good example showing why you should not use similar and ambiguous field names.

public string ID;
public int UserID;
share|improve this answer

I think you meant to do this:

// Fill data         
this.UserID = EntryID;

It's an awkward semantic situation as far as the names of your fields go, so check your logic over carefully and make sure you're assigning the right value to the right property.

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