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I need to move a div from the right to the left of the screen, but using both classic JS and jQuery makes it jerky:

My divs:

<div class="lisp" id="lisp0" style="top:100px;">)</div>
<div class="lisp2" id="lisp1" style="top:300px;">)</div>

Classic javascript method:

function move()
{
  pos = parseInt($("#lisp1").css("right"));
  $("#lisp1").css("right", pos+10+"px");
}
var interval = setInterval("move()",10);

jQuery method:

$("#lisp0").animate({"left": "-=2200px"}, 10000);

I made a webpage to show you how jerky it is. The first move is with jQuery (the smoothest one), the second one with classic JS. With several divs (and classic JS), it starts to be really annoying. I tried to modify jQuery.fx.interval, but it doesn't really increase performances.

So my question is: what is the best way to make these divs move smoothly ?

share|improve this question
    
That looks pretty smooth to me. What browser are you using? There's nothing you can do to make IE7 faster/smoother, and IE8 is going to be pretty slow and clunky too. – Pointy Mar 6 '11 at 14:20
    
I tried it on Chromium & Firefox under Ubuntu 10.10. I didn't try it on Windows, but I don't think it might help. – Loïs Di Qual Mar 6 '11 at 14:26
    
Well, it's not perfect on Chrome, but it doesn't seem that bad to me. Unfortunately, as of today, the world's browsers do not make ideal animation platforms. And a lot of people out there are still using their 1999 computers ... – Pointy Mar 6 '11 at 14:59
    
There is a lot you can do to optimize your code, like store the object and the position value in the classic method; which is better when you're animating a lot of objects on the screen. – Mottie Mar 6 '11 at 15:11
    
What do you mean by "store the object" ? – Loïs Di Qual Mar 6 '11 at 17:09
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You asked me for an example to improve the speed, I'm not an expert but here is what I would do:

  1. Don't use setInterval with string functions, they have to run through eval to run, so use this instead. In fact I wouldn't use setInterval at all for the main loop (see point #3).

    setInterval(doSomething, 100)
    
  2. Store an object you will be using multiple times (especially in a function that loops constantly). Even this example is not ideal:

    var lisp = $('#lisp1');
    function move()
    {
     var pos = parseInt( lisp.css("right"), 10 ); // always use a radix
     lisp.css("right", pos + 10 + "px");
    }
    
  3. For functions that loop constantly, be as short and concise as possible and eliminate extra function calls. From your second link, I compressed this code:

    function move(){
          $(".lisp").each(function(){
    pos = parseInt($(this).css("right"));
        if (pos > width)
          $(this).remove();
        else
          $(this).css("right", pos+speed+"px")
      });
      $(".bonus").each(function(){
        pos = parseInt($(this).css("right"));
        if (pos > width)
          $(this).remove();
        else
          $(this).css("right", pos+speed+"px")
      });
      $(".special").each(function(){
        pos = parseInt($(this).css("right"));
        if (pos > width)
          $(this).remove();
        else
          $(this).css("right", pos+speed+"px")
      });
    }
    

    into this more concise version:

    function move(){
      $(".lisp, .bonus, .special").each(function(){
        var pos = parseInt(this.style.right || 0, 10);
        if (pos > width) {
          $(this).remove();
        } else {
          this.style.right =  pos + speed + "px";
        }
      });
      if (!over) { setTimeout(move, 10); } // use this instead of the setInterval()
    }
    

    It's still not ideal, because your code keeps adding more and more objects. It should be limited because at one point I have over 200 objects on the screen and the page came to a crawl. This is also why I would use the setTimeout in the last line instead of the setInterval you use because the script may not have cycled through all of the elements before you want it to start again.

I'm sure there are more points someone else could add to optimize my or your code even more :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot ! I'll try it asap ! – Loïs Di Qual Mar 6 '11 at 19:22

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