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Doubtless this seems like a strange request, given the availability of ToString() and Convert.ToString(), but I need to convert an unsigned integer (i.e. UInt32) to its string representation, but I need to store the answer into a char[].

The reason is that I am working with character arrays for efficiency, and as the target char[] is initialised as a member to char[10] (to hold the string representation of UInt32.MaxValue) on object creation, it should be theoretically possible to do the conversion without generating any garbage (by which I mean without generating any temporary objects in the managed heap.)

Can anyone see a neat way to achieve this?

(I'm working in Framework 3.5SP1 in case that is any way relevant.)

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3  
Use modulus and division to do the conversion manually –  Matt Greer Mar 6 '11 at 14:53
2  
Do you know for sure there is performance overhead enough to where it will affect your application? int.MaxValue is at most like 30-some digits, so a 30 character string that is created and garbage collected occasionally should be pretty much unnoticeable. –  jonathanpeppers Mar 6 '11 at 14:55
2  
This does sound a lot like premature optimization. Are you sure that you really need to use those char[] instead of strings? Typically the added effort to get a working implementation is not worth the performance gain (if there is any - allocation and collection of short-lived small objects is really cheap in .NET). –  Lucero Mar 6 '11 at 14:57
2  
Matt - with respect, that much is reasonably obvious - I was looking for a neat implementation. JonathanW - no temporary strings in other words. JonathanP, Lucero - you may be right, but one of the things I find frustrating about StackOverflow is that people often jump on the premature optimization bandwagon when the real answer to the question may indeed be relevant. Perhaps I should have been clearer, and I nevertheless appreciate anyone who takes the time to post any kind of answer. –  SteveWilkinson Mar 6 '11 at 15:18
2  
@Steve, I did post an answer - but the question about premature optimization is somewhat mandatory in such a case, because it may be that even if it isn't so for your case, it may very well be so for someone else reading this question after doing a Google search or so. –  Lucero Mar 6 '11 at 15:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Further to my comment above, I wondered if log10 was too slow, so I wrote a version that doesn't use it.

For four digit numbers this version is about 35% quicker, falling to about 16% quicker for ten digit numbers.

One disadvantage is that it requires space for the full ten digits in the buffer.

I don't swear it doesn't have any bugs!

public static int ToCharArray2(uint value, char[] buffer, int bufferIndex)
{
    const int maxLength = 10;

    if (value == 0)
    {
        buffer[bufferIndex] = '0';
        return 1;
    }

    int startIndex = bufferIndex + maxLength - 1;
    int index = startIndex;
    do
    {
        buffer[index] = (char)('0' + value % 10);
        value /= 10;
        --index;
    }
    while (value != 0);

    int length = startIndex - index;

    if (bufferIndex != index + 1)
    {
        while (index != startIndex)
        {
            ++index;
            buffer[bufferIndex] = buffer[index];
            ++bufferIndex;
        }
    }

    return length;
}

Update

I should add, I'm using a Pentium 4. More recent processors may calculate transcendental functions faster.

Conclusion

I realised yesterday that I'd made a schoolboy error and run the benchmarks on a debug build. So I ran them again but it didn't actually make much difference. The first column shows the number of digits in the number being converted. The remaining columns show the times in milliseconds to convert 500,000 numbers.

Results for uint:

    luc1   arx henk1  luc3 henk2  luc2
 1   715   217   966   242   837   244
 2   877   420  1056   541   996   447
 3  1059   608  1169   835  1040   610
 4  1184   795  1282  1116  1162   801
 5  1403   969  1405  1396  1279   978
 6  1572  1149  1519  1674  1399  1170
 7  1740  1335  1648  1952  1518  1352
 8  1922  1675  1868  2233  1750  1545
 9  2087  1791  2005  2511  1893  1720
10  2263  2103  2139  2797  2012  1985

Results for ulong:

    luc1   arx henk1  luc3 henk2  luc2
 1   802   280   998   390   856   317
 2   912   516  1102   729   954   574
 3  1066   746  1243  1060  1056   818
 4  1300  1141  1362  1425  1170  1210
 5  1557  1363  1503  1742  1306  1436
 6  1801  1603  1612  2233  1413  1672
 7  2269  1814  1723  2526  1530  1861
 8  2208  2142  1920  2886  1634  2149
 9  2360  2376  2063  3211  1775  2339
10  2615  2622  2213  3639  2011  2697
11  3048  2996  2513  4199  2244  3011
12  3413  3607  2507  4853  2326  3666
13  3848  3988  2663  5618  2478  4005
14  4298  4525  2748  6302  2558  4637
15  4813  5008  2974  7005  2712  5065
16  5161  5654  3350  7986  2994  5864
17  5997  6155  3241  8329  2999  5968
18  6490  6280  3296  8847  3127  6372
19  6440  6720  3557  9514  3386  6788
20  7045  6616  3790 10135  3703  7268

luc1: Lucero's first function

arx: my function

henk1: Henk's function

luc3 Lucero's third function

henk2: Henk's function without the copy to the char array; i.e. just test the performance of ToString().

luc2: Lucero's second function

The peculiar order is the order they were created in.

I also ran the test without henk1 and henk2 so there would be no garbage collection. The times for the other three functions were nearly identical. Once the benchmark had gone past three digits the memory use was stable: so GC was happening during Henk's functions and didn't have a detrimental effect on the other functions.

Conclusion: just call ToString()

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I edited my solution and added two variations without using transcendental functions. –  Lucero Mar 7 '11 at 0:32
    
given your rep, you are obviously a relative newcomer, so I really wish I could do more than giving you an upvote, but Lucero's answer is now so complete, I think it should be marked as the correct one. Nevertheless, massive appreciation for doing all this benchmarking - when microseconds count on high volume apps (as they sometimes do in some of my applications), your function on up to 3 digits is clearly the winner. Very interesting to see how that advantage tails off the longer the number gets. Many thanks! –  SteveWilkinson Mar 7 '11 at 12:58
    
thanks for the benchmark. ;) @Steve, I don't mind if you accept this as answer. –  Lucero Mar 8 '11 at 11:34
    
Accepted due to all @arx's hard work on benchmarking. Please see @Lucero's answer too, which has some good insights. Thanks to ALL the contributors to this one :-). –  SteveWilkinson Mar 8 '11 at 15:01

The following code does it, with the following caveat: it does not respect the culture settings, but always outputs normal decimal digits.

public static int ToCharArray(uint value, char[] buffer, int bufferIndex) {
    if (value == 0) {
        buffer[bufferIndex] = '0';
        return 1;
    }
    int len = (int)Math.Ceiling(Math.Log10(value));
    for (int i = len-1; i>= 0; i--) {
        buffer[bufferIndex+i] = (char)('0'+(value%10));
        value /= 10;
    }
    return len;
}

The returned value is how much of the char[] has been used.

Edit (for arx): the following version avoids the floating-point math and swaps the buffer in-place:

public static int ToCharArray(uint value, char[] buffer, int bufferIndex) {
    if (value == 0) {
        buffer[bufferIndex] = '0';
        return 1;
    }
    int bufferEndIndex = bufferIndex;
    while (value > 0) {
        buffer[bufferEndIndex++] = (char)('0'+(value%10));
        value /= 10;
    }
    int len = bufferEndIndex-bufferIndex;
    while (--bufferEndIndex > bufferIndex) {
        char ch = buffer[bufferEndIndex];
        buffer[bufferEndIndex] = buffer[bufferIndex];
        buffer[bufferIndex++] = ch;
    }
    return len;
}

And here yet another variation which computes the number of digits in a small loop:

public static int ToCharArray(uint value, char[] buffer, int bufferIndex) {
    if (value == 0) {
        buffer[bufferIndex] = '0';
        return 1;
    }
    int len = 1;
    for (uint rem = value/10; rem > 0; rem /= 10) {
        len++;
    }
    for (int i = len-1; i>= 0; i--) {
        buffer[bufferIndex+i] = (char)('0'+(value%10));
        value /= 10;
    }
    return len;
}

I leave the benchmarking to whoever wants to do it... ;)

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1  
This assumes that buffer has already been initialized to all 0's –  Chris Pitman Mar 6 '11 at 15:19
    
Lucero - that's precisely what I had in mind (and now I feel bad for hassling you about premature optimization!). The Math.Ceiling(Math.Log10(value)) was the trick I was missing. Many thanks :-). (And PS, I am not bothered about culture settings, I just want a raw set of digits). –  SteveWilkinson Mar 6 '11 at 15:22
    
@Steve, you're welcome. I always try to answer so that the answers are clearly scoped in the case other people do read them. @Chris, no I don't assume any initialization of the array; but I'll only modify as many characters as required which is why I return the length (which could then also be used to add a '\0' if you want to have a zero-terminated character array). –  Lucero Mar 6 '11 at 15:29
    
In days of yore, log10 was a very expensive operation and it was quicker to generate the digits in reverse order at the end of the buffer then move them down to the front. I don't know if this is still true, but if speed is really that important it might be worth testing. –  arx Mar 6 '11 at 15:50
    
@arx, I did think about this. Nowadays however computing is often faster than doing memory modifications, which would be required to swap the order, so I decided to use the log10 approach. Which is faster, especially also for large uint values, could be benchmarked of course. –  Lucero Mar 6 '11 at 16:04

Let's keep it simple and maximize the use of existing code:

public static int ToCharArray(uint value, char[] buffer, int bufferIndex) 
{
     string txt = value.ToString();
     txt.CopyTo(0, buffer, bufferIndex, txt.Length);     
     return txt.Length;
}

Since txt is super-cheap gen0 garbage this is very efficient.

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This is about 2% quicker than Lucero's function so still a fair bit slower than mine. I did once halve the (substantial) runtime of a bulk database update program just by using a custom integer to string routine, but I wouldn't ordinarily use my solution in production code either. –  arx Mar 6 '11 at 17:11
    
Be careful with benchmarking: do the 2% include the GC time? The GC will need a little time every now and then if the function is called a lot. –  Lucero Mar 7 '11 at 0:18
    
Henk - indeed, but you didn't answer the question, which was zero garbage :-). The reasons for wanting zero garbage aren't particularly germane. –  SteveWilkinson Mar 7 '11 at 13:00
    
@Steve, the word "garbage" just doesn't mean anything in the way you use it... –  Henk Holterman Mar 7 '11 at 13:52

I'm coming little late to the party, but I guess you probably cannot get faster and less memory demanding results than with simple reinterpreting of the memory:

    [System.Security.SecuritySafeCritical]
    public static unsafe char[] GetChars(int value, char[] chars)
    {
        //TODO: if needed to use accross machines then
        //  this should also use BitConverter.IsLittleEndian to detect little/big endian
        //  and order bytes appropriately

        fixed (char* numPtr = chars)
            *(int*)numPtr = value;
        return chars;
    }

    [System.Security.SecuritySafeCritical]
    public static unsafe int ToInt32(char[] value)
    {
        //TODO: if needed to use accross machines then
        //  this should also use BitConverter.IsLittleEndian to detect little/big endian
        //  and order bytes appropriately

        fixed (char* numPtr = value)
            return *(int*)numPtr;
    }

This is just a demonstration of an idea - you'd obviously need to add check for char array size and make sure that you have proper byte-ordering encoding. You can peek into reflected helper methods of BitConverter for those checks.

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