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I'm splitting a string by three different characters but I want the output to include the characters I split by. Is there any easy way to do this?

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10 Answers

I'd try:

string[] parts = Regex.Split(originalString, @"(?<=[.,;])")

(if the split chars were , . and ;)

(?<=PATTERN) is positive-lookbehind. It should match at any place where the preceeding text fits PATTERN so there should be a match (and a split) after each occurance of any the characters.

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7  
This worked great for me - Thank You! I just had to make one little tweak for my purposes, as I wanted to include the delimiter at the beginning of each line (not at the end). Use @"(?=[.,;])" instead. –  MikeTeeVee Jun 12 '11 at 9:54
1  
This answer needs to be accepted so it will be easier to access. I'm an experienced SO user and it took me a while to find. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Feb 4 '13 at 1:00
    
Hi @it-depends I like your answer, but what if I want to split it using strings instead characters. For example all the separators you are using but followed by an white space. I've tried this but doesn't work. @"(?<=[. , ; ])" –  Roberto Zamora Apr 3 at 17:30
1  
@roberto-zamora I'll update the answer properly when I have time to make it more general.. but you might want to try (?<=[.,;]\s) which should match only where the delimiter character is followed by a space or other white space. –  it depends Apr 4 at 7:44
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Building off from BFree's answer, I had the same goal, but I wanted to split on an array of characters similar to the original Split method, and I also have multiple splits per string (it seems that BFree only has 1 split per string?) Here is the code I came up with:

    public static IEnumerable<string> SplitAndKeep(this string s, char[] delims)
    {
        int start = 0;
        int index = 0;

        while ((index = s.IndexOfAny(delims, start)) != -1)
        {
            index++;
            index = Interlocked.Exchange(ref start, index);

            yield return s.Substring(index, start-index-1);
            yield return s.Substring(start-1, 1);
        }

        if (start < s.Length)
        {
            yield return s.Substring(start);
        }
    }
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+1 It includes the delimiter in an array index as it sounded like the OP wanted. –  p.campbell Jun 29 '10 at 17:22
1  
Why are you using interlocked? –  Dykam Jun 29 '10 at 17:54
    
No reason particularly, I just didn't see a simple 'Swap' operation available. It could be replaced by many of the alternative swap methods. –  esac Jun 29 '10 at 18:45
1  
if (start<s.Length) yield return s.Substring(start); This prevents empty strings in result when last char is a separator. –  Marko Sep 29 '10 at 12:08
    
@Marko: thanks, I have updated the code with your suggestion. –  esac Sep 29 '10 at 17:58
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Just in case anyone wants this answer aswell...

Instead of string[] parts = Regex.Split(originalString, @"(?<=[.,;])") you could use string[] parts = Regex.Split(originalString, @"(?=yourmatch)") where yourmatch is whatever your separator is.

Supposing the original string was

777- cat

777 - dog

777 - mouse

777 - rat

777 - wolf

Regex.Split(originalString, @"(?=777)") would return

777 - cat

777 - dog

and so on

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result = originalString.Split(separator);
for(int i = 0; i < result.Length - 1; i++)
    result[i] += separator;

(EDIT - this is a bad answer - I misread his question and didn't see that he was splitting by multiple characters.)

(EDIT - a correct LINQ version is awkward, since the separator shouldn't get concatenated onto the final string in the split array.)

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This only works if there is one single separator. You may need to employ some regex magic. –  Øyvind Skaar Feb 6 '09 at 17:07
    
That's true. I'm sorry -- I didn't read the question well. –  mquander Feb 6 '09 at 17:07
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Iterate through the string character by character (which is what regex does anyway. When you find a splitter, then spin off a substring.

pseudo code

int hold, counter;
List<String> afterSplit;
string toSplit

for(hold = 0, counter = 0; counter < toSplit.Length; counter++)
{
   if(toSplit[counter] = /*split charaters*/)
   {
      afterSplit.Add(toSplit.Substring(hold, counter));
      hold = counter;
   }
}

That's sort of C# but not really. Obviously, choose the appropriate function names. Also, I think there might be an off-by-1 error in there.

But that will do what you're asking.

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This seems to work, but its not been tested much.

public static string[] SplitAndKeepSeparators(string value, char[] separators, StringSplitOptions splitOptions)
{
    List<string> splitValues = new List<string>();
    int itemStart = 0;
    for (int pos = 0; pos < value.Length; pos++)
    {
        for (int sepIndex = 0; sepIndex < separators.Length; sepIndex++)
        {
            if (separators[sepIndex] == value[pos])
            {
                // add the section of string before the separator 
                // (unless its empty and we are discarding empty sections)
                if (itemStart != pos || splitOptions == StringSplitOptions.None)
                {
                    splitValues.Add(value.Substring(itemStart, pos - itemStart));
                }
                itemStart = pos + 1;

                // add the separator
                splitValues.Add(separators[sepIndex].ToString());
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    // add anything after the final separator 
    // (unless its empty and we are discarding empty sections)
    if (itemStart != value.Length || splitOptions == StringSplitOptions.None)
    {
        splitValues.Add(value.Substring(itemStart, value.Length - itemStart));
    }

    return splitValues.ToArray();
}
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Recently I wrote an extension method do to this:

public static class StringExtensions
    {
        public static IEnumerable<string> SplitAndKeep(this string s, string seperator)
        {
            string[] obj = s.Split(new string[] { seperator }, StringSplitOptions.None);

            for (int i = 0; i < obj.Length; i++)
            {
                string result = i == obj.Length - 1 ? obj[i] : obj[i] + seperator;
                yield return result;
            }
        }
    }
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Regex.Split looks like it might be able to do what you want perhaps.

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using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace ConsoleApplication9
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string input = @"This;is:a.test";
            char sep0 = ';', sep1 = ':', sep2 = '.';
            string pattern = string.Format("[{0}{1}{2}]|[^{0}{1}{2}]+", sep0, sep1, sep2);
            Regex regex = new Regex(pattern);
            MatchCollection matches = regex.Matches(input);
            List<string> parts=new List<string>();
            foreach (Match match in matches)
            {
                parts.Add(match.ToString());
            }
        }
    }
}
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Java code:

public static class String_Ext
{
    public static string[] SplitOnGroups(this string str, string pattern)
    {
        var matches = Regex.Matches(str, pattern);
        var partsList = new List<string>();
        for (var i = 0; i < matches.Count; i++)
        {
            var groups = matches[i].Groups;
            for (var j = 0; j < groups.Count; j++)
            {
                var group = groups[j];
                partsList.Add(group.Value);
            }
        }
        return partsList.ToArray();
    }
}

var parts = "abcde  \tfgh\tikj\r\nlmno".SplitOnGroups(@"\s+|\S+");

for (var i = 0; i < parts.Length; i++)
    Print(i + "|" + Translate(parts[i]) + "|");

Output:

0|abcde|
1|  \t|
2|fgh|
3|\t|
4|ikj|
5|\r\n|
6|lmno|
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