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I want to use a generic class inside a nested static interface. My objective is to do something like this:

public class MyClass<T>{
    private MyInterface task;

    public static interface MyInterface{
        void aMethod (T item);
    }
}

But I get the error: Cannot make a static reference to the non-static type T. If I do some changes (below) I can use a generic type inside an interface, but I want to avoid this method because it's redundant to write the same class 2 times: one for MyClass and one for MyInterface.

public class MyClass<T>{
    private MyInterface<T> task;

    public static interface MyInterface<T>{
        void aMethod (T item);
    }
}

Thanks.

EDIT: I want to do this:

MyClass c = new MyClass<String> ();
c.setInterface (new MyClass.MyInterface (){
    @Override
    public void aMethod (String s){
        ...
    }
);

or

MyClass c = new MyClass<AnotherClass> ();
c.setInterface (new MyClass.MyInterface (){
    @Override
    public void aMethod (AnotherClass s){
        ...
    }
);
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2  
So what are you asking again? –  Johan Sjöberg Mar 6 '11 at 16:56
    
I want to use the generic class T specified in MyClass in a method from a nested static interface. –  Gabriel Llamas Mar 6 '11 at 16:58
    
Your nested class may not be generic and it might have multiple generic types. The only way to make this clear it list all the types –  Peter Lawrey Mar 6 '11 at 17:02
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2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

A static nested class or nested interface (which is always static, by the way) has no relation to its outer class (or interface) apart from namespace nesting and access to private variables.

So, the type parameter of the outer class is not available inside the nested interface in your case, you should define it again. To avoid confusion, I recommend using a different name for this inner parameter.

(As an example in the standard API, look for the interface Map.Entry, nested inside the interface Map, yet has no access to its type parameters and needs to declare them again.)

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It's not redundant. With a static interface:

MyClass.MyInterface<String> myInstance;

and with a non-static innter class (an interface is always static):

MyClass<String>.MyInterface myInstance;

A more real world example:

Map<String, Integer> map = ...;
for (Map.Entry<String, Integer> entry : map.entrySet()) {
    ...
}

The static approach has the advantage that you can import the nested type, and still specify the type parameters:

class ClassWithAReallyLongName<T> {
    static interface Entry<T> {
    }
}

and

import my.package.ClassWithAReallyLongName.Entry;

class Foo {
    Entry<String> bar;
}

though one should use that idiom with caution as to not confuse the reader.

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... apart from the fact that nested interfaces are always static. - Your code would work for non-static inner classes, though. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 6 '11 at 17:04
    
Oops, you're of course correct. I have edited accordingly. –  meriton Mar 6 '11 at 17:10
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