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I have a StringBuilder object that needs to be trimmed (i.e. all whitespace chars /u0020 and below removed from either end).

I can't seem to find a method in string builder that would do this.

Here's what I'm doing now:

String trimmedStr = strBuilder.toString().trim();

This gives exactly the desired output, but it requires two Strings to be allocated instead of one. Is there a more efficient to trim the string while it's still in the StringBuilder?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You should not use the deleteCharAt approach.

As Boris pointed out, the deleteCharAt method copies the array over every time. The code in the Java 5 that does this looks like this:

public AbstractStringBuilder deleteCharAt(int index) {
    if ((index < 0) || (index >= count))
        throw new StringIndexOutOfBoundsException(index);
    System.arraycopy(value, index+1, value, index, count-index-1);
    count--;
    return this;
}

Of course, speculation alone is not enough to choose one method of optimization over another, so I decided to time the 3 approaches in this thread: the original, the delete approach, and the substring approach.

Here is the code I tested for the orignal:

public static String trimOriginal(StringBuilder sb) {
    return sb.toString().trim();
}

The delete approach:

public static String trimDelete(StringBuilder sb) {
    while (sb.length() > 0 && Character.isWhitespace(sb.charAt(0))) {
        sb.deleteCharAt(0);
    }
    while (sb.length() > 0 && Character.isWhitespace(sb.charAt(sb.length() - 1))) {
        sb.deleteCharAt(sb.length() - 1);
    }
    return sb.toString();
}

And the substring approach:

public static String trimSubstring(StringBuilder sb) {
    int first, last;

    for (first=0; first<sb.length(); first++)
        if (!Character.isWhitespace(sb.charAt(first)))
            break;

    for (last=sb.length(); last>first; last--)
        if (!Character.isWhitespace(sb.charAt(last-1)))
            break;

    return sb.substring(first, last);
}

I performed 100 tests, each time generating a million-character StringBuffer with ten thousand trailing and leading spaces. The testing itself is very basic, but it gives a good idea of how long the methods take.

Here is the code to time the 3 approaches:

public static void main(String[] args) {

    long originalTime = 0;
    long deleteTime = 0;
    long substringTime = 0;

    for (int i=0; i<100; i++) {

        StringBuilder sb1 = new StringBuilder();
        StringBuilder sb2 = new StringBuilder();
        StringBuilder sb3 = new StringBuilder();

        for (int j=0; j<10000; j++) {
            sb1.append(" ");
            sb2.append(" ");
            sb3.append(" ");
        }
        for (int j=0; j<980000; j++) {
            sb1.append("a");
            sb2.append("a");
            sb3.append("a");
        }
        for (int j=0; j<10000; j++) {
            sb1.append(" ");
            sb2.append(" ");
            sb3.append(" ");
        }

        long timer1 = System.currentTimeMillis();
        trimOriginal(sb1);
        originalTime += System.currentTimeMillis() - timer1;

        long timer2 = System.currentTimeMillis();
        trimDelete(sb2);
        deleteTime += System.currentTimeMillis() - timer2;

        long timer3 = System.currentTimeMillis();
        trimSubstring(sb3);
        substringTime += System.currentTimeMillis() - timer3;
    }

    System.out.println("original:  " + originalTime + " ms");
    System.out.println("delete:    " + deleteTime + " ms");
    System.out.println("substring: " + substringTime + " ms");
}

I got the following output:

original:  176 ms
delete:    179242 ms
substring: 154 ms

As we see, the substring approach provides a very slight optimization over the original "two String" approach. However, the delete approach is extremely slow and should be avoided.

So to answer your question: you are fine trimming your StringBuilder the way you suggested in the question. The very slight optimization that the substring method offers probably does not justify the excess code.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice elaboration of my comment, I didn't had the time myself. Be careful however with those micro-benchmarks in Java. The JVM optimizes the running code in so many ways that simple micro-benchmarks can be misleading (e.g. see Anatomy of a flawed microbenchmark or this question for details). There are tools like caliper which help a bit doing them. –  Boris Mar 6 '11 at 22:38
    
In the linked question there is also an answer that links to [some articles]( ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-benchmark1.html) and a tool I've used before (but didn't found for my first comment). Also a good read. –  Boris Mar 6 '11 at 22:54
    
Hey Boris, thanks a lot for the info. I'm reading the article now, and I find it really useful so far. –  Zaven Nahapetyan Mar 6 '11 at 22:58
    
There's a slight speed benefit to substring, but I think the biggest improvement is in memory, since the string doesn't have to be copied twice like the original method. +1 –  CodeFusionMobile Mar 7 '11 at 1:32
    
Beware of the pitfalls in microbenchmarking. What happens if you change the order of the tests so that the substring version is tested first? I'd bet you get the opposite result. (Here, we have extensive unit tests for the methods our application uses, and whichever runs first runs slower than the others. Probably because of Hotspot kicking in.) –  Axel Mar 7 '11 at 8:12

I've used Zaven's analysis approach and StringBuilder's delete(start, end) method which performs far better than the deleteCharAt(index) approach, but slightly worse than the substring() approach. This method also uses the array copy, but array copy is called far fewer times (only twice in the worst case). In addition, this avoids creating multiple instances of intermediate Strings in case trim() is called repeatedly on the same StringBuilder object.

public class Main {

    public static String trimOriginal(StringBuilder sb) {
        return sb.toString().trim();
    }

    public static String trimDeleteRange(StringBuilder sb) {
        int first, last;

        for (first = 0; first < sb.length(); first++)
            if (!Character.isWhitespace(sb.charAt(first)))
                break;

        for (last = sb.length(); last > first; last--)
            if (!Character.isWhitespace(sb.charAt(last - 1)))
                break;

        if (first == last) {
            sb.delete(0, sb.length());
        } else {
           if (last < sb.length()) {
              sb.delete(last, sb.length());
           }
           if (first > 0) {
              sb.delete(0, first);
           }
        }
        return sb.toString();
    }


    public static String trimSubstring(StringBuilder sb) {
        int first, last;

        for (first = 0; first < sb.length(); first++)
            if (!Character.isWhitespace(sb.charAt(first)))
                break;

        for (last = sb.length(); last > first; last--)
            if (!Character.isWhitespace(sb.charAt(last - 1)))
                break;

        return sb.substring(first, last);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        runAnalysis(1000);
        runAnalysis(10000);
        runAnalysis(100000);
        runAnalysis(200000);
        runAnalysis(500000);
        runAnalysis(1000000);
    }

    private static void runAnalysis(int stringLength) {
        System.out.println("Main:runAnalysis(string-length=" + stringLength + ")");

        long originalTime = 0;
        long deleteTime = 0;
        long substringTime = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < 200; i++) {

            StringBuilder temp = new StringBuilder();
            char[] options = {' ', ' ', ' ', ' ', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd'};
            for (int j = 0; j < stringLength; j++) {
                temp.append(options[(int) ((Math.random() * 1000)) % options.length]);
            }
            String testStr = temp.toString();

            StringBuilder sb1 = new StringBuilder(testStr);
            StringBuilder sb2 = new StringBuilder(testStr);
            StringBuilder sb3 = new StringBuilder(testStr);

            long timer1 = System.currentTimeMillis();
            trimOriginal(sb1);
            originalTime += System.currentTimeMillis() - timer1;

            long timer2 = System.currentTimeMillis();
            trimDeleteRange(sb2);
            deleteTime += System.currentTimeMillis() - timer2;

            long timer3 = System.currentTimeMillis();
            trimSubstring(sb3);
            substringTime += System.currentTimeMillis() - timer3;
        }

        System.out.println("  original:     " + originalTime + " ms");
        System.out.println("  delete-range: " + deleteTime + " ms");
        System.out.println("  substring:    " + substringTime + " ms");
    }

}

Output:

Main:runAnalysis(string-length=1000)
  original:     0 ms
  delete-range: 4 ms
  substring:    0 ms
Main:runAnalysis(string-length=10000)
  original:     4 ms
  delete-range: 9 ms
  substring:    4 ms
Main:runAnalysis(string-length=100000)
  original:     22 ms
  delete-range: 33 ms
  substring:    43 ms
Main:runAnalysis(string-length=200000)
  original:     57 ms
  delete-range: 93 ms
  substring:    110 ms
Main:runAnalysis(string-length=500000)
  original:     266 ms
  delete-range: 220 ms
  substring:    191 ms
Main:runAnalysis(string-length=1000000)
  original:     479 ms
  delete-range: 467 ms
  substring:    426 ms
share|improve this answer
    
It would be interesting to see this benchmarked over iterations rather than string length. I wonder how much of a difference there would be. –  CodeFusionMobile Mar 7 '11 at 1:40
    
It should be easy to modify the code to add support for iterations too. I think the results would remain the same with substring performing best, but the gain from the delete method would come from saving over fewer objects to gc which is not being measured in the current benchmark code. –  shams Mar 7 '11 at 3:08

Don't worry about having two strings. It's a microoptimization.

If you really have detected a bottleneck, you can have a nearly-constant-time trimming - just iterate the first N chars, until they are Character.isWhitespace(c)

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The reason I'm worrying about it is because I'm on Android and I'm parsing an XML file, so this operation will be repeated for thousands of tags. This means that I'll be allocating about 6000 Strings instead of 3000, which is a really nice improvement. –  CodeFusionMobile Mar 6 '11 at 20:02
    
More important than this optimisation is not to use StringBuilder default constructor, give it a sufficient capacity to start with. In the current implementation default capacity is 16 characters, and if that's not enough, the buffer is replaced by a larger one. Especially for long texts, this will gain you far more than anything else (because the buffer would get reallocated several times for each line of input). –  Axel Mar 6 '11 at 21:34
    
@Axel good point. I already use a 500 char capacity in the StringBuilder ctor which is appropriate for my application –  CodeFusionMobile Mar 7 '11 at 1:36

only one of you have taken into account that when you convert the String builder to a "string" and then "trim" that you create an immutable object twice that has to be garbage collected, so the total allocation is:

  1. Stringbuilder object
  2. immutable string of the SB object 1 immutable object of the string that has been trimmed.

So whilst it may "appear" that the trim is faster, in the real world and with a loaded memory scheme it will in fact be worse.

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You get two strings, but I'd expect the data to be only allocated once. Since Strings in Java are immutable, I'd expect the trim implementation to give you an object that shares the same character data, but with different start- and end indices. At least that's what the substr method does. So, anything you try to optimise this most certainly will have the opposite effect, since you add overhead that is not needed.

Just step through the trim() method with your debugger.

share|improve this answer
    
It returns a new string object which copies the characters via arraycopy: from source code: return new String(start, end - start + 1, value); –  CodeFusionMobile Mar 7 '11 at 1:38
    
Where do you see arraycopy? This is the String constructor used by trim in JDK 1.6.0, the buffer is reused without copying: String(int offset, int count, char value[]) { this.value = value; this.offset = offset; this.count = count; } –  Axel Mar 7 '11 at 8:07

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