Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to ignore all divs that are "above" the element that has hover binded to them with jQuery? For example, I have an element A that has a hover event binded to it, but there also other elements B, C, D that are "absolute positioned" above element A. So when the user's mouse moves over to element B, C, D, the hover event is no longer fired even if B, C, and D are directly above the element. Is it possible to ignore elements B C and D?

UPDATE: I'm actually trying to create a map (element A) with elements B, C, D as area labels. So for example, for a map of New York state, you will have text elements "Manhattan", "New Jersey", etc overlapping the map. This is why I need the hover to fire even if the user has his mouse over the labels.

share|improve this question
    
Is this demonstrating your problem? jsfiddle.net/userdude/BqZ3R –  Jared Farrish Mar 6 '11 at 20:51
add comment

7 Answers

If you can use CSS3 then you can set pointer-events:none for the absolutely positioned elements, see demo here. Of course this means that it will not work in some browsers and also means that you will not have any pointer-events for those elements which might not be what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
I really like this approach, it's really useful when you have let's say big buttons with small text and you want the hover and click events to be fired when clicking in any part of the button. If you hover the text the result is like if there wasn't any text at all, just great! –  aesede Jan 21 at 21:01
add comment

The way I see it, you have a few options:

  • Do as Ivarska recommended, and create an empty element over all of them and use that for the trigger.
  • Bind to the mousemove on the entire page and find when it's "inside the box" (i.e. over the target element)--basically, re-invent the hover event. (But not this adds some pretty serious overhead to your page)
  • Redesign

You may be also able to bind to just the target (i.e. A) and any elements you have that may overlap A, then just check if the mouse position within the other control would hypothetically also be inside the A control. Less overhead than binding to the page and checking, but still more than typical.

share|improve this answer
    
@Brad Christie - There isn't any way to use event bubbling in this situation? Or am I misunderstanding event bubbling? quirksmode.org/js/events_order.html –  Jared Farrish Mar 6 '11 at 21:06
1  
@JaredFarrish: Top-most always takes priority: jsfiddle.net/taJtM (in hover anyways) –  Brad Christie Mar 6 '11 at 21:40
    
@Brad - So you mean it only fires the top-most event, and doesn't push down to the sub-element events? –  Jared Farrish Mar 6 '11 at 21:43
    
@JaredFarrish: You can, you just have to tell it that every time element B fired a hover, it should actually be saying element A is being hovered. (but this is only practical if B is a full overlap of A) –  Brad Christie Mar 6 '11 at 21:48
    
@Brad - Yeah, I was thinking that. If there is overlap, then the perimeter check is probably the way to go (still attaching hover to all elements within the perimeter). I don't like the overlay approach at all. Too artificial. –  Jared Farrish Mar 6 '11 at 21:58
show 8 more comments

Use e.relatedTarget to determine if the user hovered over one of you nested (absolute) elements. Maybe easier if you give your map labels a class

e.g: To show you labels during a hover state on the map, and only hide them when the user leaves the map

    $("#map").hover(
      function(e) { 
        $(this).find(".labels").fadeIn();
      },

      function(e) {
        if( $(e.relatedTarget).hasClass("maplabel") ) {
          //The user has hovered over a label...Do nothing (or some other function)
        } else {
          // User has left the map and isn't over a label
          $(this).find(".labels").fadeOut();
      }
    );
share|improve this answer
add comment

The only solution I've got in mind right now is to create an invisible element at the top and give it the hover trigger.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could make the z-index of the A element higher then that of the B, C and D elements.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Although there are different ways to fix this, probably the simplest would be to add the hover event to all of the elements:

HTML

<div id="a" class="hover"></div>
<div id="b" class="hover"></div>
<div id="c" class="hover"></div>
<div id="d" class="hover"></div>
<div id="state">unhovered</div>

CSS

#a {
    width: 350px;
    height: 300px;
    border: 1px solid #000;
    background-color: #ccc;
}
#b {
    position: absolute;
    top: 35px;
    left: 35px;
    width: 35px;
    height: 30px;
    border: 1px solid #000;
    background-color: #cca;
}
#c {
    position: absolute;
    top: 85px;
    left: 85px;
    width: 35px;
    height: 30px;
    border: 1px solid #000;
    background-color: #cca;
}
#d {
    position: absolute;
    top: 85px;
    left: 135px;
    width: 35px;
    height: 30px;
    border: 1px solid #000;
    background-color: #cca;
}

jQuery

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('.hover').hover(
        function(){
            $('#state').text('hovered');
        },
        function(){
            $('#state').text('unhovered');
        }
    );
});

Example here: http://jsfiddle.net/userdude/H5TAG/

share|improve this answer
add comment

The z-index adjustment someone else mentioned works. Make the z-index higher for the item you want to be recognized by hover.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.