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I'm trying to make a horizontal rule with some text in the middle.

for example:

----------------------------------- my title here -----------------------------

Is there a way to do that in css? without all the "-" dashes obviously.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Is this for inside a form tag? –  thirtydot Mar 6 '11 at 23:12
    
@thirtydot, yes it is –  Jason Mar 6 '11 at 23:34
    
in that case, as thirtydot pointed out in reply to my answer, you might want to look up the fieldset and legend elements –  Stephan Muller Mar 6 '11 at 23:37
    
stackoverflow.com/a/25691518/379855 –  Donal Sep 5 '14 at 18:08
1  
For a line with less markup and transparent background see here : stackoverflow.com/a/23584310/1811992 –  web-tiki Nov 20 '14 at 8:38

11 Answers 11

up vote 105 down vote accepted

this is roughly how i'd do it: the line is created by setting a border-bottom on the containing h2 then giving the h2 a smaller line-height. The text is then put in a nested span with a non-transparent background.

HTML:

<h2><span>THIS IS A TEST</span></h2>
<p>this is some content other</p>

CSS:

h2 {
   width: 100%; 
   text-align: center; 
   border-bottom: 1px solid #000; 
   line-height: 0.1em;
   margin: 10px 0 20px; 
} 

h2 span { 
    background:#fff; 
    padding:0 10px; 
}

I tested in Chrome only, but there's no reason it shouldn't work in other browsers.

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/7jGHS/

share|improve this answer
    
Nice one, I like this solution the most. Thanks! –  Andrey Apr 14 '12 at 5:53
    
Best solution, good job! –  Joshua Sep 4 '12 at 14:54
1  
This is my favourite solution. It works on OSX too and some of the others dont. If you use this solution remember to set the background of the span to the same color as the background of your page, it will be especially obvious what i mean if your background isn't white. ;) –  DrLazer Sep 10 '12 at 11:04
1  
any way to make this about a quarter of the way across? –  Troy Cosentino Jan 9 '13 at 22:56
1  
Get the text indented from the left by using "text-align:left; text-indent:40px;" in the h2 style. –  Matt__C Mar 27 '13 at 21:04

After trying different solutions, I have come with one valid for different text widths, any possible background and without adding extra markup.

h1 {
    overflow: hidden;
    text-align: center;
}
h1:before,
h1:after {
    background-color: #000;
    content: "";
    display: inline-block;
    height: 1px;
    position: relative;
    vertical-align: middle;
    width: 50%;
}
h1:before {
    right: 0.5em;
    margin-left: -50%;
}
h1:after {
    left: 0.5em;
    margin-right: -50%;
}

I tested it in IE8, IE9, Firefox and Chrome. You can check it here http://jsfiddle.net/Puigcerber/vLwDf/1/

share|improve this answer
5  
hmm strange.. I had this code not running in Safari, but now it works fine. This should be the top answer.. Thumbs up –  Marakoss Mar 15 '13 at 10:26
1  
I like this one best as well. To get a style where the text is indented from the left instead of centered use this change: h1 { overflow: hidden; ` text-align: left; ` text-indent: 40px; `} –  Matt__C Mar 27 '13 at 20:47
7  
This really is a good solution; particularly as it works with any background and does not require a set width on the heading element. –  Luke Apr 29 '13 at 3:52
1  
This is a GREAT solution. It's the only one I've found on SO that satisfies these 2 conditions: a) no inner span tag ; b) works on safari. Thank you! –  Jonathan Vanasco Nov 15 '13 at 23:18
1  
This is great. I adapted your code a bit to left-align the text and make the :after element the width of the block. I'm curious: what exactly is the role of margin-right: -50%? When I was fumbling around with code, missing that property would make the decoration break to another line. And even when :after is assigned 100% width, I still need the negative margin-right of 50% to make it fit. Why? –  BeetleTheNeato Nov 29 '13 at 22:40

Ok, this one is more complicated but it works in everything but IE<8

<div><span>text TEXT</span></div>

div {
    text-align: center;
    position: relative;
}
span {
    display: inline-block;    
}
span:before,
span:after {
    border-top: 1px solid black;
    display: block;
    height: 1px;
    content: " ";
    width: 40%;
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    top: 1.2em;
}
span:after {
   right: 0;  
   left: auto; 
}

The :before and :after elements are positioned absolutely so we can pull one to the left and one to the right. Also, the width (40% in this case) is very dependent of the width of the text inside.. have to think about a solution for that. At least the top: 1.2em makes sure the lines stay more or less in the center of the text even if you have different font size.

It does seem to work well though: http://jsfiddle.net/tUGrf/3/

share|improve this answer
3  
These are clever, but I sure hope the OP doesn't want this for inside a form tag. If he does, as I'm sure you know, he could simply use fieldset and legend. –  thirtydot Mar 6 '11 at 23:33
1  
Heh, you're right about that. Might as well go for that anyway if this doesn't work.. not semantically correct but it's better than having to resort to javascript for something like this imo. –  Stephan Muller Mar 6 '11 at 23:34
    
Did you @StephanMuller find any solution for the width? Cheers. –  Puigcerber Feb 5 '13 at 14:50
7  
div should have position: relative. +1 –  Fabian Feb 9 '13 at 9:24
8  
The best solution I found that works well when the screen is resided and without setting the background color of the text is jsfiddle.net/vLwDf/268 –  Xavier John Jan 6 '14 at 3:20
<div><span>text TEXT</span></div>

div { 
  height: 1px; 
  border-top: 1px solid black; 
  text-align: center; 
  position: relative; 
}
span { 
  position: relative; 
  top: -.7em; 
  background: white; 
  display: inline-block; 
}

Give the span a padding to make more space between the text and the line.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/tUGrf/

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, only problem is that you have to set the background to white and can't set it to transparent. –  Marnix Mar 6 '11 at 23:16
    
in that case you'll have to work with two lines, one on each side. That's going to be difficult to achieve in a clean way.. –  Stephan Muller Mar 6 '11 at 23:19

Yet another method:

Markup:

<span> your text </span>

CSS:

.span:after,
.span:before{
    content:" \00a0\00a0\00a0\00a0\00a0";
    text-decoration:line-through;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You should add a description what your code does, unless you want it to be deleted. –  inf3rno May 12 '14 at 14:05
    
This is an awesome and simple solution. –  Caleb Jares Jun 22 '14 at 1:57

I've been looking around for some solutions for this simple decoration and I've found quite a few ones, some weird, some even with JS to calculate the height of the font and bla,bla,bla, then I've read the one on this post and read a comment from thirtydot speaking about fieldset and legend and I thought that was it.

I'm overriding those 2 elements styles, I guess you could copy the W3C standards for them and include it on your .middle-line-text class (or whatever you want to call it) but this is what I did:

<fieldset class="featured-header">
    <legend>Your text goes here</legend>
</fieldset>

<style>
.featured-header{
    border-bottom: none;
    border-left: none;
    border-right: none;
    text-align: center;
 }

.featured-header legend{
    -webkit-padding-start: 8px; /* It sets the whitespace between the line and the text */
    -webkit-padding-end: 8px; 
    background: transparent; /** It's cool because you don't need to fill your bg-color as you would need to in some of the other examples that you can find (: */
    font-weight: normal; /* I preffer the text to be regular instead of bold  */
    color: YOU_CHOOSE;
}   

</style>

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/legnaleama/3t7wjpa2/

I've played with the border styles and it also works in Android ;) (Tested on kitkat 4.XX)

EDIT:

Following Bekerov Artur's idea which is a nice option too, I've changed the .png base64 image to create the stroke with an .SVG so you can render in any resolution and also change the colour of the element without any other software involved :)

/* SVG solution based on Bekerov Artur */
/* Flexible solution, scalable, adaptable and also color customizable*/
.stroke {
background-image: url("data:image/svg+xml;utf8,<svg xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2000/svg' xmlns:xlink='http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink' x='0px' y='0px' width='1px' height='1px' viewBox='0 0 1 1' enable-background='new 0 0 1 1' fill='%23ff6600' xml:space='preserve'><rect width='1' height='1'/></svg>");
background-repeat: repeat-x;
background-position: left;
text-align: center;
}
.stroke h3 {
background-color: #ffffff;
margin: 0 auto;
padding:0 10px;
display: inline-block;
font-size: 66px;
}
share|improve this answer

Solution for IE8 and newer...

Issues worth noting:

Using background-color to mask a border might not be the best solution. If you have a complex (or unknown) background color (or image), masking will ultimately fail. Also, if you resize the text, you'll notice that white background color (or whatever you set) will start covering up the text on the line above (or below).

You also don't want to "guesstimate" how wide the the sections are either, because it makes the styles very inflexible and almost impossible to implement on a responsive site where the width of the content is changing.

Solution:

(View JSFiddle)

Instead of "masking" a border with a background-color, use your display property.

HTML

<div class="group">
    <div class="item line"></div>
    <div class="item text">This is a test</div>
    <div class="item line"></div>
</div>

CSS

.group { display: table; width: 100%; }
.item { display: table-cell; }
.text { white-space: nowrap; width: 1%; padding: 0 10px; }
.line { border-bottom: 1px solid #000; position: relative; top: -.5em; }

Resize your text by placing your font-size property on the .group element.

Limitations:

  • No multi-line text. Single lines only.
  • HTML markup isn't as elegant
  • top property on .line element needs to be half of line-height. So, if you have a line-height of 1.5em, then the top should be -.75em. This is a limitation because it's not automated, and if you are applying these styles on elements with different line-heights, then you might need to reapply your line-height style.

For me, these limitations outweigh the "issues" I noted at the beginning of my answer for most implementations.

share|improve this answer
    
Works on chrome. Seems semantic and fairly simple. Works with bootstrap. –  Jeff Ancel May 15 '14 at 2:37

for later(nowdays) browser , display:flex andd pseudo-elements makes it easy to draw . border-style, box-shadow and even background helps too for the makeup.

h1 {
  display:flex;
  background:linear-gradient(to left,gray,lightgray,white,yellow,turquoise);;
}
h1:before, h1:after {
  color:white;
  content:'';
  flex:1;
  border-bottom:groove 2px;
  margin:auto 0.25em;
  box-shadow: 0 -1px ;/* ou 0 1px si border-style:ridge */
}
<h1>side lines via flex</h1>

share|improve this answer

If anyone is wondering how to set the heading such that it appears with a fixed distance to the left side (and not centered as presented above), I figured that out by modifying @Puigcerber's code.

h1 {
  white-space: nowrap;
  overflow: hidden;
}

h1:before, 
h1:after {
  background-color: #000;
  content: "";
  display: inline-block;
  height: 1px;
  position: relative;
  vertical-align: middle;
}

h1:before {
  right: 0.3em;
  width: 50px;
}

h1:after {
  left: 0.3em;
  width: 100%;
}

Here the JSFiddle.

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I am not too sure, but you could try using a horizontal rule and pushing the text above its top margin. You will need a fixed width on your paragraph tag and a background too. It's a little hacky and I don't know if it will work on all browsers, and you need to set the negative margin based on the size of the font. Works on chrome though.

<style>   
 p{ margin-top:-20px; background:#fff; width:20px;}
</style>

<hr><p>def</p>
share|improve this answer

Easier than I've seen, without :before and :after http://codepen.io/bekerov/pen/QwbaNR

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