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    var q = (from Comments in db.tblBlogComments where Comments.blogID == this.ID orderby Comments.date descending select new {
        Comments.userID, Comments.comment, Comments.date
    });

This returns ALL my associated records, how best would I select say records #10 to #20 only so I don't load any redundant data?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How about:

var q = (
from Comments in db.tblBlogComments 
where Comments.blogID == this.ID 
orderby Comments.date descending 
select new { Comments.userID, Comments.comment, Comments.date }).Skip(10).Take(10);
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1  
To address your concern about performance... this is completely up to the LINQ provider, but Skip and Take are usually implemented in the most efficient way possible for the underlying data provider. For ex., in SQL 2005 / 2008 this would likely be translated into a ROW_NUMBER() ranking expression. –  Michael Petito Mar 6 '11 at 23:15
    
you can find the actual translation at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb399342.aspx, looks like it uses a nested query. –  tvanfosson Mar 6 '11 at 23:32
    
@tvanfosson: Maybe in this Skip(1) Take(1) example with LINQ-SQL it uses subqueries with TOP but I've seen subqueries with ranking expressions as well. –  Michael Petito Mar 6 '11 at 23:37

You can use the .Skip() and .Take() methods on your result set. Example:

var q = (from Comments in db.tblBlogComments where Comments.blogID == this.ID orderby Comments.date descending select new {
    Comments.userID, Comments.comment, Comments.date
});

And then use:

int pageSize = 10;
int page = 3;
var currentPage = q.Skip((currentPage - 1) * pageSize).Take(pageSize);

And then

foreach(var item in currentPage)
{
    ...
}

Since Linq uses deferred execution, the actual query will be created and executed during the foreach loop. So the SQL query will only return the records for the current page.

Edit: More information about this subject

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Will this be inefficient for when there are say thousands of records? I don't want to load them into memory when I'm never going to use them. –  Tom Gullen Mar 6 '11 at 23:13
    
@Tom - Unless you specifically dump them to a list or an array, linq only loads one record in memory at a time. You would have to transfer them over the wire, though. –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 6 '11 at 23:14
int start = 10;
int end = 20;
var q = (from Comments in db.tblBlogComments 
            where Comments.blogID == this.ID 
            orderby Comments.date descending 
            select new {
                          Comments.userID, 
                          Comments.comment, 
                          Comments.date
                       }).Skip(start).Take(end - start);

I'm not sure if Skip translates to SQL executed in the database, so this might be not so efficient.

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I'm assuming Comments.ID is not related to the ID field stored in that record? –  Tom Gullen Mar 6 '11 at 23:12
    
Yeah sorry if I didn't make it clear, but it's meant to select the range, this is for pagination, so if it returns 100 records I only need records 20-30 if I am on page 3. If that makes sense. –  Tom Gullen Mar 6 '11 at 23:14

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