Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

JavaScript doesn't care if your Strings are double-quoted "double" or single-quoted 'single'.

Every example of ECMAScript 5's strict mode has it enabled by "use strict" in double-quotes. Can I do the following (single-quotes):

alert(function(){
  'use strict';
  return !this;
}());

This will return true if Strict mode is enabled, and false if it is not.

share|improve this question
4  
Why not try and see? –  Myles Gray Mar 6 '11 at 23:57
    
@Myles Gray - I don't have a browser that supports Strict mode at work :( –  Rudiger Mar 7 '11 at 0:00
    
Why do you have to know it now then? If you can't use it anyway... You can still try at home ;) –  Felix Kling Mar 7 '11 at 0:01
    
@Felix Kling - None of the major browsers support Strict mode :( See kangax.github.com/es5-compat-table –  Rudiger Mar 7 '11 at 0:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 31 down vote accepted

For you, without using a browser that supports strict mode:

A Use Strict Directive is an ExpressionStatement in a Directive Prologue whose StringLiteral is either the exact character sequences "use strict" or 'use strict'. A Use Strict Directive may not contain an EscapeSequence or LineContinuation.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, now that's good timing! –  user113716 Mar 7 '11 at 0:06
    
@patrick dw: :D Indeed :) –  Felix Kling Mar 7 '11 at 0:07
    
If you are using gzip to compress the content then I would recommend using double quotes or single quotes depending on which one shows up most in the document. –  Eric May 6 '12 at 18:49
    
Okay, but how about JS engine support? I don't think there are any known quirks at the moment, but I'm not sure. –  Pumbaa80 Jul 29 '13 at 14:58
    
@Pumbaa80: You mean if there is a problem if strict mode is not supported? I highly doubt it. The syntax was chosen to make it backwards compatible. An engine that does not support strict mode simply sees an expression statement with a lone string literal. –  Felix Kling Aug 21 '13 at 16:39

http://ecma262-5.com/ELS5_HTML.htm#Section_14.1

A Use Strict Directive is an ExpressionStatement in a Directive Prologue whose StringLiteral is either the exact character sequences "use strict" or 'use strict'. A Use Strict Directive may not contain an EscapeSequence or LineContinuation.

share|improve this answer
2  
Upvote each for awesome timing! –  Myles Gray Mar 7 '11 at 0:07

According to the mozilla documentation you can use both "use strict"; and 'use strict';.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.