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I've got a c homework problem that is doing my head in and will be greatful if anyone can help point me in the right direction.

If I have two minutes points on an analog watch such as t1 (55 minutes) and t2 (7 minutes), I need to calculate the shortest amount of steps between the two points.

What I've come up with so far is these two equations:

-t1 + t2 + 60 =
    -55 + 7 + 60 
    = 12

t1 - t2 + 60 = 
    55 - 7 + 60 
    = 108

12 is lower then 108, therefore 12 steps is the shortest distance.

This appears to work fine if I compare the two results and use the lowest. However, if I pick out another two points for example let t1 = 39 and t2 = 34 and plug them into the equation:

-t1 + t2 + 60 = -39 + 34 + 60 = 55
t1 - t2 + 60 = 39 - 34 + 60 = 35

35 is lower then 55, therefore 35 steps is the shortest distance.

However, 35 isn't the correct answer. 5 steps is the shorest distance (39 - 34 = 5).

My brain is a little fried, and I know I am missing something simple. Can anyone help?

Analog clock face

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1  
+1 for asking a clear question, and disclosing up front that it is homework. :) –  Robert Harvey Mar 7 '11 at 1:39
    
t1 - t2 + 60 = 39 - 34 + 60 = 35 is not correct: the result should be 65. Edward Z. Yang answered the question, though, anyway. –  Jeremiah Willcock Mar 7 '11 at 1:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you want is addition and subtraction modulo 60. Check out the % operator. Make sure you handle negatives correctly.

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Thanks Edward, got my head around the problem now and getting the correct results! –  Michael Pasqualone Mar 7 '11 at 2:10

If you don't want to use % operator, try to think this way: for each couple of points (t1; t2), you'll have two way to connect them: one path will cross 0 (12 o'clock), and the other won't.

Provided that t2 >= t1, the second distance is easy to calculate: it's t2 - t1. the other distance is t1 + 60 - t2

I think your mistake was adding 60 in the first expression.

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