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I'm wondering if anyone could give me a suggestion for to best handle this situation:

I have several systems from which to pull data to display on a single PHP-driven website. The type of information will be the same across systems (contacts, addresses, etc) but the way I pull data (MS-SQL, XML, REST) will not.

I want to create a class, or set of classes, for each of the connection types and use simple methods such as getContact(), getAddress(), etc. I am wondering how best to structure this.

The most obvious way that comes to mind means creating classes for each connection type, like:

class.sys_mysql.php. class.sys_xml.php, etc

But then won't I be duplicating the methods in each class? Maybe that's OK, but I'm curious if there's a better way, as far as future maintenance goes.

Maybe I should simply isolate the queries/data extraction methods, into separate class files? Classes within classes? Extended classes? I'm less familiar with these.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

DC

--------- more info ----------

Hi all. I really appreciate all the great advice. Not to belabor this thread but I'm still a bit confused on how I should break things down. I will try and be a bit more specific:

Basically, I have 3 (more in the future) offices, from which one PHP website pulls information. Each office uses a different CRM, and a different system for interfacing with that CRM. One uses MSSQL, another XML requests, etc.

Each office wants to display information similarly on the website, but there are minor differences. There may be more differences in the future. However, there are by far more similarities, and so I want to capitalize on higher level functions like getContacts($id) which are shared between them.

I am trying to write these classes so I can:

1) use higher level methods to pull data easily

2) account for different ways of pulling data (xml,sql,etc)

3) account for differences between how data is displayed on the website (office 1, office 2, office 3)

4) manage the connection credentials for each office and allow for expandability_

5) I should also mention that I will be creating separate classes for reporting, sending out automated e-mails, calculating finances...separate modules that will need to use existing classes to pull data.

I realize that some of the examples here see to cover 1 and 2, but I am confused as to how to get 3, 4 and 5 working with 1 and 2.

I really appreciate the help.

DC

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

This is what Interfaces are for.

You define the methods required to interact with the data in an Interface, and then you create classes that implement that Interface

If some of the systems have similar access models (i.e. perhaps two different DB Servers, but both are accessed using PDO) you could abstract it further and put the "low level" functionality into service-specific classes (which implement an Interface) and then a higher-level class which defines the actual methods you use.

Another option is that you could put the "common" methods (those that are identical or can be made idetntical with service-type checks) into a base class, which all others extend.

Example for option one:

interface DataModel {
    public function findContacts($search);
    public function getContact($id);
    public function findAddresses($search);
    public function getAddress($id);
}

class XMLDataModel implements DataModel {
    public function findContacts($search) {
        ...
    }

    public function getContact($id) {
        ...
    }

    public function findAddresses($search) {
        ...
    }

    public function getAddress($id) {
        ...
    }
}

class RESTDataModel implements DataModel {
    public function findContacts($search) {
        ...
    }

    public function getContact($id) {
        ...
    }

    public function findAddresses($search) {
        ...
    }

    public function getAddress($id) {
        ...
    }
}

As you can see, you simply define an Interface, which specifies which methods a class must implement.

If you had two very similar classes, perhaps one for MySQL and one for PostreSQL, and you can't/don't want to combine them into a single PDO class, you could do the following:

class PDODataModel implements DataModel {

    private $model;

    public function __construct ($serverType) {
        if ($serverType === 'mysql') {
            $this->model = new MySQLPDODataModel();
        }
        elseif ($serverType === 'postgresql') {
            $this->model = new PostgresQLPDODataModel();
        }
    }

    public function findContacts($search) {
        // common logic about $search, perhaps checking it's a valid search?

        $result = $this->model->searchForContacts($search);

        // more common logic, maybe higher level filtering..

        return $result;
    }

    public function getContact($id) {
        ...
    }

    public function findAddresses($search) {
        ...
    }

    public function getAddress($id) {
        ...
    }
}

interface PDODataModelDriver {
    public function searchForContacts($search);
}

class MySQLPDODataModel extends PDODataModel implements PDODataModelDriver {

    public function searchForContacts($search) {

        // MySQL-specific query to search for contacts
    }    

}

class PostgresSQLPDODataModel extends PDODataModel implements PDODataModelDriver {

    public function searchForContacts($search) {

        // PostgreSQL-specific query to search for contacts
    }    

}

The other option I mentioned was to work in the opposite direction:

abstract class PDODataModel implements DataModel {

    protected $pdo;
    protected $dsn;

    public function __construct () {
        $this->pdo = new PDO($this->dsn);
    }

    public function findContacts($search) {
        // common logic about $search, perhaps checking it's a valid search?

        $result = $this->searchForContacts($search);

        // more common logic, maybe higher level filtering..

        return $result;
    }

    public function getContact($id) {
        ...
    }

    public function findAddresses($search) {
        ...
    }

    public function getAddress($id) {
        ...
    }
}

class MySQLPDODataModel extends PDODataModel {

    protected $dsn = 'mysql:dbname=testdb;host=127.0.0.1';

    protected function searchForContacts($search) {

        // MySQL-specific query to search for contacts
    }    

}

class PostgresSQLPDODataModel extends PDODataModel {

    protected $dsn = 'pgsql:host=localhost;port=5432;dbname=testdb';

    protected function searchForContacts($search) {

        // PostgreSQL-specific query to search for contacts
    }    

}
share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea of interfaces -- having never used them -- but I'm wondering about the levels of abstraction. Does the interface connect with the data at lower levels (i.e. concatenating queries, connections) or would it actually run the queries (i.e. "select * from contact)? I guess that's where I'm getting confused since now it seems like I need 3 layers for each type of connection: 1) data connections, opening, closing, formatting sql 2) for the specific queries 3) a layer that handles routing requests to the proper classes/interface. Am I making sense? –  Dietcheese Mar 7 '11 at 5:11
    
ill add some example code to show how it might work. –  Stephen Mar 7 '11 at 7:11
    
Thanks Stephen. Now say I wanted to have classes to group specific methods with each data model. For example, I wanted a class that was just to manipulate contact information, but I wanted another class for extracting and calculating payment information. Would I just create more classes to extend the DataModel class? Is that how it should be broken down? I appreciate your help. –  Dietcheese Mar 7 '11 at 17:28
    
Yes, I would take that approach. For each "type" of data (i.e in a DB it might be tables, in LDAP it might be different objectClasses, etc) you should maintain separate Models, ideally they would extend a class that has the low level functionality for that specific "service" - i.e. the various models that get data from LDAP should use a single low-level LDAP class, which simply provides generic access. –  Stephen Mar 7 '11 at 19:39
    
Stephen, in your first example, can the XMLDataModel class have methods that are not defined in the interface? Say I wanted some methods to parse XML but those methods wouldn't apply for a database connection. Would they be private in the XMLDataModel class? –  Dietcheese Mar 11 '11 at 6:10

This is a classical example of a strategy design patter. Your first mind was absolutely fine, but if you're repeating yourself in each class you should consider creation of a abstract class that will handle the common code.

So it could look like this:

$myService = new MyService(new XMLReader('/path/to/file'));

echo $myService->getContanct('abc')->getName();

And skeleton of your classes:

 class MyService {
      private $reader;

      public function __construct(ReaderInterface $reader) {
          $this->reader = $reader;
      }

      // ...

      public function getContacnt($id) {
          $contact =  $this->reader->getContact($id);

          // do some extra stuff here

          return $contact;
      }
 }

 interface ReaderInterface {
      public function getContanct($id);
      public function getAddress($id);
 }

 abstract class AbstractReader implements ReaderInterface {
     protected $loaded = false;
     protected $data = array();

     abstract protected function load();

     public function getContanct($id) {
         if ($this->loaded == false) {
             $this->load();
             $this->loaded = true;
         }

         return $this->data['contact'][$id];
     }
 }

 class XMLReader extends AbstractReader {
      public function __construct($filepath) {
          ...
      }

      protected function load() {
          ...
          foreach (...) {
              $this->data[...] = ...;
          }
      }
 }

 class MSSQLReader extends AbstractReader {
      public function __construct(PDO $dbh) {
          ...
      }

      protected function load() {
          ...
          while ($row = $stmt->fetchRow()) {
              $this->data[...] = ...;
          }
      }
 }

EDIT (2011-03-07) - According to your comment.

  1. PHP supports variable variables (new $type()) but never use this! It's a horrible, and if overused make code really crappy.
  2. This is a yet another example of a "classical issue". Use a factory pattern (depending on the complexion of the creation you might want to use more abstract variety of this pattern - abstract factory
  3. When you need to dynamically determine class name (eg. from variable) use reflection API to instate an object.
share|improve this answer
    
I like this example. I appreciate it. In this example, how would you go about passing which "reader" to use (XMLReader, MSSQLReader, etc)? Could you do $myService = new MyService(new $READERTYPE ('/path/to/file')); To be more clear: once I instantiate the class, I want it to behave according to some previously assigned variables. –  Dietcheese Mar 7 '11 at 5:34
    
@Dietcheese: Check my updated answer. –  Crozin Mar 7 '11 at 10:13

You should create an object-storage mapping layer for each data source, which instantiates the objects into storage agnostic model objects. See http://martinfowler.com/eaaCatalog/dataMapper.html

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Only for quoting Martin Fowler. If anyone wants to learn OO, that should be one of the very first places to go. –  David Conde Mar 7 '11 at 7:16

If you have control over the structure of your data formats, I suggest you serialize your data in a consistent way (especially in XML) and provide drivers for each data format.

For instance, every driver will have 'findAll', 'getOne', 'count', etc. methods. The driver can be given a model to populate with the retrieved data.

abstract class DataDriver {
    function __construct($model) {}
    abstract public function findAll();
    abstract public function getOne();
    abstract public function count();
    // ...
}
class XMLDriver extends DataDriver {
    // implements all the methods
}
class SQLDriver extends DataDriver {
    // implements all the methods
}

class Contact {
    public var $firstName;
    public var $lastName;

    function getFullName() {
        return trim($this->firstName . ' ' . $this->lastName);
    }
}

$accessor = new SQLDriver('Contact');
$contacts = $accessor->findAll();

If your data will be serialized in an uncontrolled manner, the approach you suggest is the best. Just make sure to separate your models (e.g. Address book, Contact) from the method of retrieval (eg. get_address_book_xml, get_address_book_sql, etc.)

Of course there are many ways of separating your models from your data-mapping driver. The importance is you find the solution that works best for you given that you're using such different formats.

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1  
DataDriver should probably be an abstract class with abstract functions to force their implementation in child classes. –  Jacob Mar 7 '11 at 2:23

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