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I'm having some issues calling a function on an object whose name is determined dynamically. The code below illustrates how my code is currently set up, and the problem that I'm having is occurring in the function called doSomethingElse().

var Obj = function(){
    this.test = this.objMgr();
};


Obj.prototype.objMgr = function(){

     var self = this;


     function doSomething(){
          //do some processing that seems unimportant to this particular prob

          doSomethingElse();
     }


     function doSomethingElse(){

          //The object that I need is determined at runtime, and is therefore dynamic
          var callFuncOnThis = 'subObj';

          //How the heck can I call function a on the object referenced in callFuncOnThis
          this[callFuncOnThis].a(); //Doesn't work, this refers to dom window
          self[callFuncOnThis].a(); //Doesn't work, self refers to obj
          eval(callFuncOnThis).a(); //Works, but is there a better way?
     }


     var subObj = {
          a:function(){
          },
          b:function(){
          }
     };


     var subObj2 = {
          a:function(){
          },
          b:function(){
          }
     };


     doSomething();

     return{
         subObj:subObj,
         subObj2:subObj2
     }

};

var test = new Obj();
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3  
Please briefly describe your question in the title. Another Javascript OO question doesn't really do that. –  alex Mar 7 '11 at 2:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

subObj is never assigned to a scope you can simply reference. That is why eval() is your best solution. Having said this, I'm looking at one weird bit of code. Can you elaborate on it a little? I feel like there is an architectural problem.

Also, since you're returning an object that contains subObj and subObj2, why not use that as your scope.

function doSomethingElse(){
    // ...
    retObj[callFuncOnThis].a()
}

var retObj = {'subObj': subObj, 'subObj2': subObj2};

doSomething();

return retObj;
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure where to start. I think there might be an architectural problem as well. I'm still relatively new to js. Anyway, the code in the question is a small part of a jquery plugin I'm building. The plugin has several different "components" you can use simultaneously. These are the subObjs in code above. The plugin performs a base set of initialization and then loops through the components the user has chosen and calls an init function on each of them...so there is actually a loop around the code in doSomethingElse. –  Mark Brown Mar 7 '11 at 3:19
    
You lost me. But the point is, the object you're returning should be explicitly defined (as in my code) and you can use it as the scope for 'subObj2'. –  Dimitry Mar 7 '11 at 3:23
    
Works perfectly and makes sense. Thanks! –  Mark Brown Mar 7 '11 at 3:29
    
Is there anything in particular that looks weird about the code? It feels weird to me, but I haven't been able to figure out why.... –  Mark Brown Mar 7 '11 at 3:30
    
Without seeing the rest of your code, it's hard to say. I am under the impression there is a lot going on that you're not showing. –  Dimitry Mar 7 '11 at 3:32

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