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How can I split an IEnumerable<String> into groups of IEnumerable<string>

I have a list that I would like to break into groups of 10.

If I have an object

List<Person> allPendingPersons 

that is of length m.

Is there an elegant way in LINQ to break up allPendingPersons into one or more List objects that all have a up to 10 Persons?

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marked as duplicate by Gabe, Robert Harvey Mar 7 '11 at 16:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted
 var groups = allPendingPersons.Select((p, index) => new {p,index})
                               .GroupBy(a =>a.index/10 );

if you want to process IGrouping<,>. If you are looking for List> back you could try

var listOfLists = allPendingPersons.Select((p, index) => new {p, index})
    .GroupBy(a => a.index/10)
    .Select((grp => grp.Select(g => g.p).ToList()))
    .ToList();
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You can write your own extension method:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Partition<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, int size) {
    List<T> partition = new List<T>(size);
    foreach(var item in sequence) {
        partition.Add(item);
        if (partition.Count == size) {
            yield return partition;
            partition = new List<T>(size);
        }
    }
    if (partition.Count > 0)
        yield return partition;
}

I explored this in more depth in my blog.

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1  
slightly better to do: partition = new List<T>(size); –  nawfal Feb 18 '13 at 13:55
    
@nawfal: You're right; fixed. –  SLaks Feb 18 '13 at 21:50
    
this is so good! I used it directly on my list of items that needed action on. foreach (var b in senders.Partition(threshold)) { handleBatch(b); } simple and elegant, thanks! –  Sonic Soul May 1 at 19:30

The Reactive Extensions for .NET (Rx) has an extension method that does exactly what you want:

var buffered = allPendingPersons.BufferWithCount(10);

If you want to do it using LINQ you could do this:

var buffered =
    allPendingPersons
        .Select((p, i) => new { Group = i / 10, Person = p })
        .GroupBy(x => x.Group, x => x.Person)
        .Select(g => g.ToArray());
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It's not the most efficient technique, but this will produce an IEnumerable<IEnumerable<Person>> sequence, with each inner sequence containing ten elements:

var query = allPendingPersons.Select((x, i) => new { Value = x, Group = i / 10 })
                             .GroupBy(x => x.Group,
                                      (k, g) => g.Select(x => x.Value));

And if the result really does need to be a list-of-lists rather than a simple sequence then you can create a List<List<Person>> instead by adding in a couple of ToList calls:

var query = allPendingPersons.Select((x, i) => new { Value = x, Group = i / 10 })
                             .GroupBy(x => x.Group,
                                      (k, g) => g.Select(x => x.Value).ToList())
                             .ToList();
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1  
You can simplify your first version a little bit by writing x => x.Value instead of (k, g) => g.Select(x => x.Value). –  Elian Ebbing Mar 7 '11 at 3:40

Try an iterator block:

public static IEnumerable<List<Person>> AsGroups(this List<Person> persons)
{
    var buf = new List<Person>(10);
    for (int i = 0; i<persons.Count i++;)
    {
        buf.Add(persons[i]);
        if (i%10 == 0 && buf.Count > 0)
        {
           yield return buf;
           buf = new List<Person>(10);
        }
    }
    yield return buf;
 }
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Is there an elegant way in LINQ

The elegant way is not very performant. Here is a more performant way...

    public static List<List<T>> Chunk<T>(
      this List<T> theList,
      int chunkSize
    )
    {
        if (!theList.Any())
        {
            return new List<List<T>>();
        }

        List<List<T>> result = new List<List<T>>();
        List<T> currentList = new List<T>();
        result.Add(currentList);

        int i = 0;
        foreach(T item in theList)
        {
            if (i >= chunkSize)
            {
                i = 0;
                currentList = new List<T>();
                result.Add(currentList);
            }
            i += 1;
            currentList.Add(item);
        }
        return result;
    }
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1  
You can be more performant than that by writing an iterator. See my answer. –  SLaks Mar 8 '11 at 16:26

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