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I have an inventory program written to include an array and a method to calculate total cost for all inventory items entered. I now have to include a subclass that overrides the original to include "one unique feature". I created a new file named ItemDetails to set up for the subclasses of the original Item. I need to include one unique feature and calculate the value of the inventory and calculate a 5% restocking fee in this subclass. Do I just transfer some of the relevant lines into the other class? Or do I write some code twice? I don't know what to do next. Any help is useful. Thanks. This is what I have so far:

package inventory3;

public class ItemDetails extends Items
{
public static void override()
    {
    private String Name;
    private double pNumber, Units, Price;

public ItemDetails()
        {
        }
    }
}

This is the Item class file that it is supposed to override:

package inventory3;

import java.lang.Comparable;                

    public class Items implements Comparable
{
       private String Name;
       private double pNumber, Units, Price;

public Items()
    {
Name = "";
pNumber = 0.0;
Units = 0.0;
Price = 0.0;
    }

public int compareTo(Object item)
    {

  Items tmp = (Items) item;


    return this.getName().compareTo(tmp.getName());
    } 


public Items(String productName, double productNumber, double unitsInStock, double unitPrice)
    {
    Name = productName;
    pNumber = productNumber;
    Units = unitsInStock;
    Price = unitPrice;
    }
    //setter methods
public void setName(String n)
    {
    Name = n;
    }

public void setpNumber(double no)
    {
    pNumber = no;
    }

public void setUnits(double u)
    {
    Units = u;
    }

public void setPrice(double p)
    {
    Price = p;
    }

//getter methods
public String getName()
    {
return Name;
    }

public double getpNumber()
    {
return pNumber;
    }

public double getUnits()
    {
return Units;
    }

public double getPrice()
    {
return Price;
    }

public double calculateTotalPrice()
    {
    return (Units * Price);
    }

public static double getCombinedCost(Items[] item)          
    {
    double combined = 0;        

    for(int i =0; i < item.length; ++i)
        {
        combined = combined + item[i].calculateTotalPrice();        

        } 
    return combined;
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Check out the examples in this post. –  Bala R Mar 7 '11 at 3:48
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You simply declare a method with the same signature as the method in the parent class. So yours would look like:

package inventory3;

public class ItemDetails extends Items {
    private String Name;
    private double pNumber, Units, Price;

    public ItemDetails(String Name, double pNumber, double Units, double Price) {
        this.Name = Name;
        this.pNumber = pNumber;
        this.Units = Units;
        this.Price = Price;
    }

    // getters and setters....

    // The @Override is optional, but recommended.
    @Override
    public double calculateTotalPrice() {
        return Units * Price * 1.05; // From my understanding this is what you want to do
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This is helpful. How else would I implement this without the @override? And how would I call for this in my main file? –  g3n3rallyl0st Mar 7 '11 at 4:05
    
@g3n3rally: Well, you could just leave off the @Override and you'd be fine. However, the Java compiler can give you extra help if you leave it in there. To call it from your main file, you could simply create a new instance of the ItemDetails class and call the method you want normally. –  alpha123 Mar 7 '11 at 4:09
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