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I'm trying to apply the object properties from objA to objB but I realised Ext.apply is flawed (or blessing?) in a way where it only applies first level objects together.

Example:

var objA = {
    name: 'objA',
    baseParams: {
        cols: [1,2,3,4,5]
    }
};

//used in subclass
var objB = {
    name: 'objB',
    baseParams: {
        limit: 50,
        sort: 'name'
    }
};

//used in baseclass
var objC = {
    name: 'objC',
    baseParams: {
        as_hash: true,
        limit: 20
    }
};

Ext.apply(objB,objA); //used in subclass
Ext.apply(objC,objB); //used in baseclass

Example will output:

obj = {
    name: 'objA',
    baseParams: {
        cols: [1,2,3,4,5]
    }
};

I'd like this output instead (expected output):

obj = {
    name: 'objA',
    baseParams: {
        cols: [1,2,3,4,5],
        as_hash: true,
        limit: 50,
        sort: 'name'
    }
};

How can I achieve this without doing this?

// subclass:
var bpTemp = {};
bpTemp.baseParams = Ext.apply(objB.baseParams, objA.baseParams);
Ext.apply(objB,objA); 
Ext.apply(objB,bpTemp); 

// base class: 
var bpTemp = {};
bpTemp.baseParams = Ext.apply(objC.baseParams, objB.baseParams);
Ext.apply(objC,objB); 
Ext.apply(objC,bpTemp); 
share|improve this question
    
interesting question, looking forward to a good solution –  ChrisR Mar 7 '11 at 11:55
    
Thanks, still looking for an answer though. –  CincauHangus Mar 8 '11 at 2:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can change up the way Ext.apply() works so that a 4th argument can be a boolean implying "deep" apply -- this will work with your example (deep defaults to true):

Ext.apply = function(o, c, defaults, deep){
    deep = deep!==false;
    // no "this" reference for friendly out of scope calls
    if(defaults){
        Ext.apply(o, defaults);
    }
    if(o && c && typeof c == 'object'){
        for(var p in c){
            o[p] = (deep && Ext.isObject(o[p]) && Ext.isObject(c[p])) ? Ext.apply(o[p], c[p]) : c[p];
        }
    }
    return o;
}; 
share|improve this answer
    
FYI -- I defaulted the "deep" argument to true to make your example work... but I would not do that in your app because Ext may depend on non-deep applies internally -- I would explicitly make it "deep" on a case by case basis in your app –  Johnathan Hebert Mar 9 '11 at 2:24
1  
you have a good solution, but it's not practical nor advisable to change a library function as it may affect other people using it (especially if it's a commonly used method). I'm marking this as an answer because it answers the question. –  CincauHangus Feb 15 '12 at 9:49
    
Agree, but this change could be safe(r) if you defaulted "deep" to false... –  Johnathan Hebert Feb 16 '12 at 20:16

You can try a recursive solution, with a few special cases, as below:

function deepApply(receiver, config, defaults) {
    if (defaults) {
        deepApply(receiver, defaults);
    }
    if (receiver && config && typeof config == 'object') {
        for (var p in config) {
            if (typeof config[p] != 'object' || Ext.isArray(config[p])) {
                receiver[p] = config[p];
            } else {
                if (typeof receiver[p] != 'object') {
                    receiver[p] = {};
                }
                deepApply(receiver[p], config[p]);
            }
        }
    }
    return receiver;
}
share|improve this answer

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