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I'm writing an assembly program that calculates Fibonacci numbers, but I need to find a way to detect for overflow when the numbers get too large. My current code is:

.file   "fib.c"
.text
.globl fib
    .type   fib, @function
fib:
    pushl %ebp
    movl %esp, %ebp
    movl 8(%ebp), %eax
    cmpl $0, %eax
    je .end
    cmpl $1, %eax
    je .end

    pushl %edx

    subl $1, %eax
    push %eax
    call fib
    popl %ebx
    movl %eax, %edx

    movl 8(%ebp), %eax
    subl $2, %eax
    push %eax
    call fib
    popl %ebx
    addl %edx, %eax
    jo .overflow
    popl %edx

.end:
    movl %ebp, %esp
    popl %ebp
    ret
.overflow:
    movl $-1, %eax
    ret

I thought I would be able to just use the jo test to see if there was an overflow (Around line 25), but I get a segmentation fault when I enter a number that should overflow.

Any thoughts how I can do this correctly? (BTW, running on a 32 bit machine if that matters)

Thanks, Mike

EDIT: For anyone who is interested, here is the working version. I wasn't clearing the stack and I wasn't checking for overflow on the movl after the first computation.

.file "fib.c"
.text
.globl fib
    .type   fib, @function
fib:
    pushl %ebp
    movl %esp, %ebp
    movl 8(%ebp), %eax
    cmpl $0, %eax
    je .end
    cmpl $1, %eax
    je .end

    pushl %edx  

    subl $1, %eax
    pushl %eax
    call fib
    popl %ebx
    movl %eax, %edx
    jo .overflow

    movl 8(%ebp), %eax
    subl $2, %eax
    pushl %eax
    call fib
    popl %ebx
    addl %edx, %eax
    jo .overflow
    popl %edx

.end:
    movl %ebp, %esp
    popl %ebp
    ret
.overflow:
    movl $-1, %eax
    movl $-1, %edx
    jmp .end
share|improve this question
    
You posted code that works instead of the code you have a problem with. Not a good idea. Fix the snippet and show exactly where the fault occurs. –  Hans Passant Mar 7 '11 at 7:13
    
That code actually did cause a segmentation fault because I didn't do an overflow check on "movl %eax, %edx". I did however fix it and I am editing now with working code. –  Swift Mar 12 '11 at 0:54
    
Mike, without checking, I don't believe MOV instructions set or reset any flags. I don't code in assembly much any more though, so I could very well be wrong. –  jcomeau_ictx Mar 12 '11 at 10:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

since you're using recursion, I'd suspect the stack is what is overflowing, causing your segfault.


on second thought, when you hit numeric overflow, you 'ret' without cleaning up your stack first. jump to '.end' instead:


.overflow:
    movl $-1, %eax
    jmp .end
share|improve this answer
    
time for me to get some sleep, I can't think clearly. I believe the answer is correct as of my last edit. –  jcomeau_ictx Mar 7 '11 at 7:38

Not sure of this will fix your problem, but there are a couple of typos here where you say push instead of pushl.

share|improve this answer

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