Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I seem to have found a case where I should be suffering from the "dreaded" diamond inheritance problem. However, the code appears to work just fine. What I can't seem to figure out for sure is if there could be a problem.

Here is the setup. I am using MFC and have extended CEdit to add custom handling of a mouse click windows message. I then inherit from this class and a class written by a third party developer (call him Bob for this example). Doing this, I can now return either my special control or an enhanced version of Bob's control. Problem is, Bob's library can not be modified and both our code ultimately inherits from CEdit (and CWnd for that matter).

Example code:

class A : public CEdit {...}       // From Bob's library
class B : public A {...}           // From Bob's library
class BobsEdit : public B {...}    // From Bob's library

// My version which handles WM_LBUTTONDOWN, WM_CREATE 
// and does a couple other cool things.
class MyEdit : public CEdit 
{
    afx_msg int OnCreate(LPCREATESTRUCT lpCreateStruct) 
    {
         if ( !CEdit::Create(...) ) return -1;

         ...set some style stuff... 
    }

    afx_msg void OnLButtonDown(UINT nFlags,CPoint point) {}  // Override CWnd handler
}  

class MyBobsEdit : public BobsEdit, public MyEdit {}   // My version of Bob's control


// CBobsUser returns just a standard CEdit and BobsEdit control
// This is also from Bob's library.

class CBobsUser   
{
    CWnd* GetMeAnEditBox() 
    {
        CEdit* pEdit;
        if ( ...some condition... )
          pEdit = new CEdit();
        else
          pEdit = new BobsEdit();

        ...
        return pEdit;
    }
}

// CMyUser overrides Bob's GetMeAnEditBox and returns 
// one of my custom controls (with the new cool handler).
class CMyUser : public CBobsUser
{    
...

    CWnd* GetMeAnEditBox() 
    {
        MyEdit* pEdit;
        if ( ...some condition... )
          pEdit = new MyEdit();
        else
          pEdit = new MyBobsEdit();

        ...
        return pEdit;
    }                 
}

So... Questions are:

  1. Why does this not seem to suffer from the diamond inheritance problem?
  2. Is there an issue I don't see with this design that could bite me in the future?
  3. Is there another way to fix this if I can't modify code on one side of the diamond (i.e. I can't declare CEdit virtual on both sides? )

Thanks!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Ad 1: Because nothing ever knows the object is CBobsEdit. You create the object as MyBobsEdit, but immediately cast it to MyEdit, so all method calls are on MyEdit and no abiguous call errors arise and the cast itself is not ambiguous either. No functionality of CBobsEdit is ever used (you don't have any methods in the subclass). It is constructed, but it is never added to a parent, so it's never shown and never used.

Ad 2: Well, you are not using BobsEdit at all. Which, I suppose, is not what you wanted.

Ad 3: You can make MyEdit a template that is inherited from it's template argument and inherit it directly from CEdit in one case and from CBobsEdit in the other case. This technique is often called "mixin". Like:

template <typename BaseEditT>
class MyEdit : public BaseEditT { ... }

Unfortunately MyEdit<CEdit> and MyEdit<CBobsEdit> are unrelated classes. If you can do with storing the pointer as CEdit (which is always a base class), you'll have to define an interface, implement this interface in MyEdit and store pointer to that interface. The interface will need to contain a cast-operator to CEdit& (and CEdit const&) and than you should be able to call any CEdit methods on it. Like this:

class IMyEdit {
    virtual operator CEdit &() = 0;
    virtual operator CEdit const &() const = 0;
};

template <typename BaseEditT>
class MyEdit : public BaseEditT {
    operator CEdit &() { return *this; }
    operator CEdit const &() const { return *this; }
};

Note, that than only the code constructing the objects will need to see definition of the MyEdit template, so you can put it in a separate file and include it only where you define CMyUser constructor to avoid the penalty on compile-time.

share|improve this answer
    
If none of the derived classes implement any virtual functions or data members, you can cast willy-nilly between them. Ordinarily this would be frowned upon by the C++ community as it relies on undocumented compiler-specific workings, but MFC heavily relies on this so you should be safe. –  Mark Ransom Aug 1 '11 at 20:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.