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I'm very new to GLSL, but I'm trying to write convolution kernel with in a fragment shader for image processing. I was able to do this just fine when my kernel was small (3x3) using a constant matrix. Now, however, I'd like to use a kernel of size 9x9. Or for that matter of arbitrary size. My initial thought was to setup a texture memory containing the convolution kernel. Then using a 2Dsampler I'd read the texture memory of the kernel and convolve it with the texture memory of the image (also a 2Dsampler). Is this the right way to go about this?

I suppose you could also make an array of arbitrary size that contains coefficients. This might work for 81 coefficients, but what happens if you want something larger? Like say a 20x20?

In general if you need to access multiple large objects in GLSL what's the proper strategy? Thanks! Thanks,

D

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Did you implement this? Can you share your implementation? –  user4749 Dec 11 '12 at 13:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sequential access:

  1. Vertex Attributes

Random access:

  1. Texture Buffers / Uniform blocks if the source is a buffer
  2. Uniforms if the source is small
  3. Textures otherwise
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Thank you! Much appreciated. –  Doov Mar 8 '11 at 7:10
    
Can you expand on how to use vertex attributes for this? Would one have a separate vertex attribute for each offset? Why would this be faster than using a const array of vertex indices? –  Alex Flint Jun 21 '12 at 15:37
    
@Doov: please mark the answer as solution if it helped you –  kvark Nov 14 '13 at 15:27
    
@AlexFlint: my answer was to the general question ("In general if you need to access multiple large objects in GLSL what's the proper strategy?"). I wouldn't recommend using vertex attributes for storing convolution coefficients at all :) –  kvark Nov 14 '13 at 15:30

Yes, since uniform and constant space is limited, using a texture as replacement is a good strategy.

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Thank you! Much appreciated. –  Doov Mar 8 '11 at 7:09

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