Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a div with default positioning (i.e. position:static) and a div with a fixed position.

If I set the z-indexes of the elements, it seems impossible to make the fixed element go behind the static element.

HTML:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
     <body>
          <div id="over">
               Hello Hello HelloHelloHelloHelloHello Hello Hello Hello Hello Hello Hello Hello Hello Hello Hello
          </div>  
          <div id="under">
          </div>
     </body>
</html>

CSS:

#over {
  width: 600px;
  z-index: 10;
}

#under {
  position: fixed;
  top: 5px;
  width: 420px;
  left: 20px;
  border: 1px solid;
  height: 10%;
  background: #fff;
  z-index: 1;
}

On jsfiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/mhFxf/

I can work around this by using

position:absolute

on the static element, but can anyone tell me why this is happening?

(There seems to be a similar question to this one, (Fixed Positioning breaking z-index) but it dosen't have a satisfactory answer, hence I am asking this here with my example code)

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

Add position: relative; to #over

Fiddle

HTML

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
    <div id="over">
        Hello Hello HelloHelloHelloHelloHello Hello Hello Hello Hello Hello Hello Hello Hello Hello Hello
    </div>  

    <div id="under"></div>
</body>
</html>

CSS

#over {
  width: 600px;
  z-index: 10;
  position: relative;    
}

#under {
  position: fixed;
  top: 5px;
  width: 420px;
  left: 20px;
  border: 1px solid;
  height: 10%;
  background: #fff;
  z-index: 1;
}
share|improve this answer
5  
+1 This is why I love SO. Thanks! –  iambriansreed Sep 18 '12 at 3:45
4  
+1 Love simple solutions! –  gyo Nov 13 '12 at 13:39
3  
updates.html5rocks.com/2012/09/… is an excellent reference on how position fixed, absolute and relative interact with z-index. –  Did Aug 29 '13 at 9:25
1  
Thanks @Michel for the suggested edit :) –  marflar Mar 26 at 18:37
    
@marflar My pleasure. Btw, take a look at your fiddle. there is an extra tag </body> and an extra tag </html> in the end. –  Michel Ayres Mar 26 at 18:52

z-index only works within a particular context i.e. relative, fixed or absolute position.

z-index for a relative div has nothing to do with the z-index of an absolutely or fixed div.

share|improve this answer
2  
Can you expand on how z-index works in a particular context, and/or provide a reference? –  DanSingerman Mar 7 '11 at 16:51
8  
z-index affects the order of two divs even if one is position relative and the other is absolute. –  Raffael Apr 23 '12 at 13:42
5  
This answer is wrong. Here is a fiddle demonstrating stacking context as it is explained here. @Dansingerman. –  kdbanman Jul 17 at 17:06
    
Thanks for your jsFiddle @kbdanman, it helped me understand the stacking context with a visual. –  webdeveloper Sep 16 at 15:43

since your over div doesn't have a positioning, the z-index doesn't know where and how to position it (and with respect to what?). Just change your over div's position to relative, so there is no side effects on that div and then the under div will obey to your will.

here is your example on jsfiddle: Fiddle

edit: I see someone already mentioned this answer!

share|improve this answer

Give the #under a negative z-index, e.g. -1

This happens because the z-index property is ignored in position: static;, which happens to be the default value; so in the CSS code you wrote, z-index is 1 for both elements no matter how high you set it in #over.

By giving #under a negative value, it will be behind any z-index: 1; element, i.e. #over.

share|improve this answer
    
I had this problem too - setting the 'under' div to 0 worked for me. –  Mick Sear Jul 10 '12 at 18:03

When elements are positioned outside the normal flow, they can overlap other elements.

according to Overlapping Elements section on http://web.archive.org/web/20130501103219/http://w3schools.com/css/css_positioning.asp

share|improve this answer

the behaviour of fixed elements (and absolute elements) as defined in CSS Spec:

They behave as they are detached from document, and placed in the nearest fixed/absolute positioned parent. (not a word by word quote)

This makes zindex calculation a bit complicated, I solved my problem (the same situation) by dynamically creating a container in body element and moving all such elements (which are class-ed as "my-fixed-ones" inside that body-level element)

share|improve this answer

protected by Community Oct 31 '12 at 16:53

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.