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I have written a simple method that receives a Generic that I wish to place into an ArrayList using the ArrayList.Add() method. However I have discovered that when I go add a new item with the same type as previous items in the ArrayList this new item overwrites the previous items individual properties.

Here's the code its pretty basic and rather embarrassingly I can't seem to rectify this overwriting problem.

public class ChromosomeTree<T>
{
    private GeneNode<T> root;
    private ArrayList children = new ArrayList();
    private int depMax;

    string stemp;

    public ChromosomeTree()
    {
        root = null;
    }

    public virtual void Clear()
    {
        root = null;
    }

    public GeneNode<T> Root
    {
        get
        {
            return root;
        }
        set
        {
            root = value;
        }
    }

    public int MaxDepth
    {
        get
        {
            return depMax;
        }
        set
        {
            depMax = value;
        }
    }

    public ArrayList Children
    {
        get
        {
            return children;
        }
    }

    public GeneNode<T> lastChild()
    {
        return (GeneNode<T>)this.Children[this.Children.Count - 1];
    }

    public void addFull(GeneNode<T> node)
    {
        //check if the chromosome tree has a root if not add the first node as the chromosomes root

        if (this.Root == null)
        {
            this.Root = node;
            children.Add(node);
            stemp += " " + node.Value;
        }
        else
        {
            for (int i = 0; i <= this.Children.Count - 1; i++)
            {
                GeneNode<T> parent = (GeneNode<T>)this.Children[i];

                //check to ensure maxDepth of chromosome tree is not exceeded
                if (parent.Depth != this.MaxDepth)
                {
                    //check to see if the current node stil has room for another node to be added to it
                    if ((parent.Children == null) || (parent.Children[1] == null))
                    {
                        children.Add(node);
                        parent.Add(node);

                        stemp += " " + node.Value;

                        break;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        string chromosome = String.Empty;

        foreach(GeneNode<Gene> gene in this.Children)
        {
            chromosome += " " + gene.Value.GeneValue.ToString();
        }

        return chromosome;
    }
}

Im pretty sure its a simple mistake but ive looked at this for so long I cant see the wood from the trees. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks in advance.

Luke

here is the code that utilises the this class.

EDIT : THE OVERWRITE HAPPENS WHEN THE METHOD IS CALLED NOT AFTER THE METHOD HAS EXECUTED ITS LOGIC

 class SimpleChromosome
{
    Random rand = new Random();

    Gene funcGene = new Gene();
    Gene termGene = new Gene();

    private string sChromosome;

    private int currentdepth;

    private string grownChromosome()
    {
        return sChromosome;
    }

    public ChromosomeTree<Gene> fullChromosome()
    {
        ChromosomeTree<Gene> chromosone = new ChromosomeTree<Gene>();
        //chromosone.MaxDepth = rand.Next(1, 5);
        chromosone.MaxDepth = 1;

        int maxGenes = (int)Math.Pow(2, chromosone.MaxDepth + 1) - 1;

        for (int i = 0; i <= chromosone.MaxDepth; i++)
        {
            int numNodesForLevel = (int)Math.Pow(2, i);
            int numNodesOnLevel = 0;

            for (int j = 0; j < numNodesForLevel; j++)
            {
                if (currentdepth != chromosone.MaxDepth)
                {
                    funcGene.GenerateValue(GeneType.Function);
                    GeneNode<Gene> geneNode = new GeneNode<Gene>(funcGene);
                    sChromosome += " " + geneNode.Value;
                    chromosone.addFull(geneNode);

                    numNodesOnLevel++;
                }
                else
                {
                    termGene.GenerateValue(GeneType.Terminal);
                    GeneNode<Gene> geneNode = new GeneNode<Gene>(termGene);
                    sChromosome += " " + geneNode.Value;
                    chromosone.addFull(geneNode);

                    numNodesOnLevel++;
                }

                if ((numNodesForLevel == numNodesOnLevel) && (currentdepth != chromosone.MaxDepth))
                {
                    currentdepth++;
                }
            }
        }
        currentdepth = 0;

        //Console.WriteLine("Before ADD :" + sChromosome);

        sChromosome = "";

        return chromosone;
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Might help to post the code where you're using this class. I'm wondering if you're just adding the same instance to the list all the time. –  Nick Mar 7 '11 at 12:42
6  
Why are you using ArrayList given that you can clearly use generics, out of interest? –  Jon Skeet Mar 7 '11 at 12:43
    
Do you mean to add a copy of the reference to the root list for each child? –  smartcaveman Mar 7 '11 at 12:52
    
@Nick I added the code that calls this class above. @Jon Skeet to be honest it never really crossed my mind I just choose to use an ArrayList due to not knowing how many members where going to be present in it at run time. What would you suggest ? @smartcavenman not intentionally where is this happening? –  user648132 Mar 7 '11 at 12:56
1  
List<T> (with the degenerate case List<object>) made ArrayList obsolete in almost all use-cases. –  CodesInChaos Mar 7 '11 at 12:59

3 Answers 3

Post the code where you are adding a new object of this type to your ArrayList.

My guess is that you are using two references to the same object.

Remember that objects are reference types, therefore if you assign them to each other you are only assigning their references. e.g. in the following code:

Foo foo1 = new Foo();
foo1.x = 1;
Foo foo2 = new Foo();
foo2.x = 2;

foo2 = foo1; // foo2 now points to the same object as foo1;
// foo1.x does not get copied into foo2.x.
// You have also lost your reference to the original foo2 object here and it will be garbage collected.
foo2.x = 100;
// since foo2 and foo1 are now pointing to the same object. both foo2.x and foo1.x will be 100
share|improve this answer
    
Posted the additional code which passes the generic to the add method. Do you think it is a result of calling GeneNode<Gene> geneNode = new GeneNode<Gene>(); twice with different instantiation values. –  user648132 Mar 7 '11 at 13:03

For this sort of relationship you really should be coding to interfaces. eg.

public interface IGeneNode{
  //genenode definition including perhaps equality interfaces etc
}

If the above is correct then you can overload your Assignment operator to pass the values you wish to pass.

This might be useful to you as well.

C# - Multiple generic types in one list

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I don't see what you mean by this. Would you mind explaining it a little further ? –  user648132 Mar 7 '11 at 13:28

in this loop parent == Children[i] and Children is a getter for children

Do you really mean to be adding the same node to children and parent, which would make the same node a sibling of parent in addition to a child? I'm not clear on what you're really trying to do but this seems wrong:

    if ((parent.Children == null) || (parent.Children[1] == null))
     {
          children.Add(node);
          parent.Add(node);
..
     }

edit

From the supporting code you posted the problem could be related to how you create objects:

/* outside the loop */
    Gene funcGene = new Gene();
    Gene termGene = new Gene();

...

/* inside the loop*/
    funcGene.GenerateValue(GeneType.Function);
    GeneNode<Gene> geneNode = new GeneNode<Gene>(funcGene);
    sChromosome += " " + geneNode.Value;
    chromosone.addFull(geneNode);

Seems like you are create a new GeneNode multiple times using a one of two instances of Gene in its constructor. Assuming that your GeneNode is saving that as a property value, each GeneNode is going to reference the same instance of Gene (well, one of two, either funcGene or termGene). I'm guessing this is what you mean when you say new item with the same type as previous items in the ArrayList this new item overwrites the previous items individual properties. Any changes to a Gene property assigned from the constructor in any node of the same type will refer to the same Gene. Even though you are creating new GeneNodes they are constructed from the same Gene.

So assuming that GeneNode.Value references the Gene that it was constructed with, there can only be two different values returned (corresponding to the the current value of one of the two Gene instances) by any node at any given point in time.

Probably, you want to move the code to create a new Gene inside your loop.

share|improve this answer
    
parent in this case is not another ArrayList it is just a different object. The condition just checks if the parent has children or if it has reached its max number of children. The parent effectively has its own ArrayList of children which should not exceed a count of 2. Where as the Tree can have multiple children to it more than just 2. –  user648132 Mar 7 '11 at 13:06
    
parent = (GeneNode<T>)this.Children[i]; -- and Children = {get this.children} - so children.Add() creates a sibling of parent –  Jamie Treworgy Mar 7 '11 at 13:08
    
I appreciate what you are saying but parent = (GeneNode<T>)this.Children[i]; gets the last added node from the tree. this.children is simply a container for all nodes added to the tree it does not enforce and parent/child relationship. So really doing children.Add() is just adding a new child to the trees list of children which I can index directly. Its not strictly making anything a sibling of anything. –  user648132 Mar 7 '11 at 13:38
    
OK. This is a pretty confusing construct, but anyway, I think I see what the problem is. See edit. –  Jamie Treworgy Mar 7 '11 at 14:27
    
It would appear that this problem is alot more deep seated than I initially expected. Your suggestion above has kind of worked but its almost as if it has just moved the problem down a level.Its very frustrating a prime example of where not designing it properly is screwing me over. Fundamentally speaking the problem is still happening though. I wish there was a way for you to get hold of the source then you could see exactly what I mean. Appreciate the above none the less, cheers. –  user648132 Mar 7 '11 at 15:14

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