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Part of a website I am currently working on contains registration process where users have to provide their email address. Just recently I became aware that non-ascii based domains are possible (so is email). My backend is utf-8 encoded MySQL where I am expecting any users (with differnt locales) should be able to enter their email but don't know how to validate this kind of email address.

Currently I am testing out jquery tools and it validates the english email address correctly but fails to validate non ascii email. Also I need to do same at server side with php. Is there a regular expression that can validate this kind of email address?

I have tried this but it fails in jquery tools (this is just example for demo, I don't understand this too)

闪闪发光@闪闪发光.com

Also what will happen when they type their English email address (jonesmith@somemail.com) with their own IME. Can this be validated with current regular expression we have for English mail validation. Currently I don't have to worry if that email exist for not.

Thanks

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1  
You can use \p{L} to match any unicode letter. –  mario Mar 7 '11 at 12:45
    
@mario Using your example, just posted an answer! –  Ilia Rostovtsev Jan 8 '14 at 10:08

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Attempting to validate email addresses may not be a good idea. The specifications (RFC5321, RFC5322) allow for so much flexibility that validating them with regular expressions is literally impossible, and validating with a function is a great deal of work. The result of this is that most email validation schemes end up rejecting a large number of valid email addresses, much to the inconvenience of the users. (By far the most common example of this is not allowing the + character.)

It is more likely that the user will (accidentally or deliberately) enter an incorrect email address than in an invalid one, so actually validating is a great deal of work for very little benefit, with possible costs if you do it incorrectly.

I would recommend that you just check for the presence of an @ character on the client and then send a confirmation email to verify it; it's the most practical way to validate and it confirms that the address is correct as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. I wanted to know if mailers like sendmail or phpmail can handle this UTf-8 encoded email address right out of the box without any modification in my part. –  Deepak Mar 7 '11 at 13:03
    
This is the best option I have. Thanks! –  Deepak Mar 8 '11 at 8:02
    
While technically correct that validating an email with regex is nearly impossible, I couldn't disagree more with this answer as a general solution. In most real world (non-theoretical) applications, you'd be storing the relevant email address in a database, and/or doing some manipulation on it in the future. Allowing any old UTF-8 string to pass unencumbered to the data layer is a terrible idea. I'd rather reject a few "off the wall" valid email addresses than have a 100% chance of a clever injection attack. In the real world, "hi"\ ~e^ery!@myhost won't come up too often. –  s.co.tt Oct 31 '13 at 20:00

As offered by Mario, playing around a bit, I came up with the following regex to validate non-standard email address:

^([\p{L}\.\-\d]+)@([\p{L}\-\.\d]+)((\.(\p{L}){2,63})+)$

It would validate any proper email address with all kind of Unicode letters, with TLD limitations from 2 to 63 characters.

Please check it and let me know if there are any flaws.

Example Online

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It's valid for PHP, not for JavaScript. –  D.A.H Aug 17 '14 at 20:42
    
@D.A.H JavaScript does not support Unicode shortcuts. You could use Steven Levithan's XRexExp package with Unicode add-ons - xregexp.com/plugins. –  Ilia Rostovtsev Aug 17 '14 at 22:10

On this subject I liked this page so much that I set up a blog exposing sites that do validation wrong (contributions gratefully received - don't let yours be on it!).

As far as using regexes go, those that say "it's wrong", tend to be light on alternatives, and TBH validation to the last letter of the RFC isn't really that critical - for example while noddy+!#$%&'*-/=?+_{}|~test@gmail.com is a perfectly valid address, it's not too unreasonable to reject it given that a surprisingly large proportion of users can't even type 'hotmail' correctly. Some domains are also quite restrictive on user names anyway, particularly hotmail. So I'm in favour of regexes that are demonstrably reasonable, and my favourite source for that is this page, though I don't like their current JS 'winner' and it would help if they set up a public test page.

jQuery's validate plugin uses this regex which is interestingly constructed, quite similar in style (but smaller!) to the ex-parrot one (actually my ISP!) linked by @powtac .

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Got this idea from Javascript tutorial page. It is basic but it works for me without worrying about complexity of regular expressions and unicode standards.

Client side validation

if(!$.trim(value).length) {
    return false;
}
else {

    AtPos = value.indexOf("@");
    StopPos = value.lastIndexOf(".");

    if (AtPos == -1 || StopPos == -1) {
        return false;
    }

    if (StopPos < AtPos) {
        return false;
    }

    if (StopPos - AtPos == 1) {
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}

Serverside validation

if(!isset($_POST['emailaddr']) || trim($_POST['emailaddr']) == "") {
    //Error: Email required
}
else {
    $atpos = strpos($_POST['emailaddr'],'@');
    $stoppos = strpos($_POST['emailaddr'],'.');

    if(($atpos === false) || ($stoppos === false)) {
        //Error: invalid email
    }
    else {
        if($stoppos < $atpos) {
            //Error: invalid email
        }
        else {
            if (($stoppos-$atpos) == 1) {
            //Error: invalid email
        }
    }
}

Though it still has some loop holes, I guess users will not be fooling around with this stuff. Also real validation is requierd for serious stuff as suggested by 'Jeremy Banks'.

Hope this will be helpful for somebody else too.

Thanks and regards to all

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Since 5.2 PHP has a build in validation for email addresses. But I'm not sure if it works for UFT-8 encoded strings:

echo filter_var($email, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL);

In the original PHP source code, line 525 you will find the reg exp for validating email, this can be used for manually validating when using PHP < 5.2.

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Thanks. I guess this is one step to right direction for server side validation. –  Deepak Mar 7 '11 at 13:26
2  
No, it doesn't support UTF-8! –  Ilia Rostovtsev Jan 8 '14 at 9:26

what is about something this:

mb_internal_encoding("UTF-8");
mb_regex_encoding("UTF-8");
mb_ereg('[\w]+@[\w]+\.com',$mail,'UTF-8');
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I will try this. –  Deepak Mar 7 '11 at 13:16
    
that regex doesn't really do any validation (will return false positives and false negatives) –  symcbean Mar 7 '11 at 16:46
1  
all emails end with .com? –  Edson Medina Jan 8 '13 at 15:25
    
\w doesn't match . or - (which are valid characters for both domain and email) –  Edson Medina Jan 8 '13 at 15:26
    
@EdsonMedina >all emails end with .com< That depends. This answer is more an example. If you build an company internal webpage and if you need to validate the mail address in order to allow company internal address only, than this could by one way. Of cause an strict mail-syntax is needed. –  The Bndr Nov 20 '14 at 9:04

a reg exp could be something like this:

[^ ]+@[^ ]+\.[^ ]{2,6}
share|improve this answer
2  
There is nothing limiting TLDs to 2-6 characters, and given ICANN's decision to allow the creation of arbitrary ones it seems reasonable to assume that addresses such as .microsoft will be in use before too long. Also, it is possible for spaces to be included in valid email addresses if they are properly escaped. –  Jeremy Banks Mar 7 '11 at 13:00
1  
no prob, extend the {2,6} to what ever you want. It could also replaced by [^ ]. –  powtac Mar 7 '11 at 13:07
    
Thanks for the info. Validation of this kind seems like a herculean task to me. –  Deepak Mar 7 '11 at 13:10
    
Just try the solutions of The Bndr and figure out if it works... –  powtac Mar 7 '11 at 13:11
    
It is not a trivial question. Try to cover as much as you can with your reg exp. Check this link to see what the real reg exp would look like in PERL: ex-parrot.com/~pdw/Mail-RFC822-Address.html –  powtac Mar 7 '11 at 13:13

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