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I came across this problem while preparing for an interview and curious to know the diffrent ways it can be written. I found this at http://cslibrary.stanford.edu/103/ and have given the problem as it is.

here is a code to build the list {1,2,3}

struct node* BuildOneTwoThree() {
    struct node* head = NULL;
    struct node* second = NULL;
    struct node* third = NULL;
    head = malloc(sizeof(struct node)); // allocate 3 nodes in the heap
    second = malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    third = malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    head->data = 1; // setup first node
    head->next = second; // note: pointer assignment rule
    second->data = 2; // setup second node
    second->next = third;
    third->data = 3; // setup third link
    third->next = NULL;
    // At this point, the linked list referenced by "head"
    // matches the list in the drawing.
    return head;
}

Q: Write the code with the smallest number of assignments (=) which will build the above memory structure. A: It requires 3 calls to malloc(). 3 int assignments (=) to setup the ints. 4 pointer assignments to setup head and the 3 next fields. With a little cleverness and knowledge of the C language, this can all be done with 7 assignment operations (=).

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I did it with six assignments. What do I get?

struct node
{
    int data;
    struct node * next;
};

struct node * build_123()
{
    struct node * first = malloc(sizeof(*first));
    struct node * second = malloc(sizeof(*second));
    struct node * third = malloc(sizeof(*third));

    assert(first && second && third);

    *first = (struct node){ 1, second };
    *second = (struct node){ 2, third };
    *third = (struct node){ 3, NULL };

    return first;
}


Also, the exercise isn't very useful. If I wanted to build a linked list from a known set of integers, I'd do something like this:

struct node
{
    int data;
    struct node * next;
};

#define build_list(...) \
    _build_list((sizeof((int []){ __VA_ARGS__ }))/(sizeof(int)), \
    (int []){ __VA_ARGS__ })

struct node * _build_list(size_t count, int values[count])
{
    struct node * next = NULL;

    for(size_t i = count; i--; )
    {
        struct node * current = malloc(sizeof *current);
        assert(current);
        *current = (struct node){ values[i], next };
        next = current;
    }

    return next;
}

Then, you can build an arbitrary list with

struct node * list = build_list(1, 2, 3);


Here's another version using a single assignment, inspired by codelogic's answer:

struct node * build_123(void)
{
    struct node * list = malloc(sizeof(struct node [3]));
    return memcpy(
        list,
        (struct node []){ { 1, list + 1 }, { 2, list + 2 }, { 3, NULL } },
        sizeof(struct node [3])
    );
}


Finally, I slightly modified MSN's solution - now, there's no assignment at all:

struct node
{
    int data;
    struct node * next;
};

struct node * make_node(struct node * new_node, int data, struct node * next)
{
    return memcpy(new_node, &(struct node){ data, next }, sizeof(*new_node));
}

struct node * create_node(int data, struct node * next)
{
    return make_node(malloc(sizeof(struct node)), data, next);
}

struct node * build_123(void)
{
    return create_node(1, create_node(2, create_node(3, NULL)));
}
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node= malloc
node->data= 1
node->next= malloc
node->next->data= 2
node->next->next= malloc
node->next->next->data= 3
node->next->next->next= NULL

And here's one that does it with two:

node *make_node(node *new_node, int data, node *next) 
{ new_node->data= data; new_node->next= next; return new_node; }

node *create_node(int data, node *next) 
{ return make_node((node *)malloc(sizeof(node)), data, next); }

node *BuildOneTwoThree(void) 
{ return create_node(1, create_node(2, create_node(3, NULL))); }
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know if replacing assignments with function calls is really any better ;) –  Christoph Feb 6 '09 at 21:21
    
Of course it's not :) But the question isn't about actual complexity, just complexity in terms of assignment operators, which means you can abuse the rest of it however you like (as your solution does as well). –  MSN Feb 6 '09 at 21:40
    
@MSN: I 'borrowed' your solution and replaced it with one without any assignments thanks to memcpy() and compound literals... –  Christoph Feb 6 '09 at 21:55

Slight modification of Christoph's code with 4 assignments using the fact that it's always building 3 nodes:

struct node
{
    int data;
    struct node * next;
};

struct node * build_123()
{
    struct node* head = malloc( sizeof(struct node) * 3);
    *head     = (struct node){ 1, head+1 };
    *(head+1) = (struct node){ 2, head+2 };
    *(head+2) = (struct node){ 3, NULL };
    return head;
}

EDIT: Technically (in terms of assembly), using a struct initializer would probably result in at least 2 assignments, one for each member. So it only appears like it's 4 assignments in C code, when it fact it is 7 or more. Similarly, MSN's recursive solution will also result in more than 2 assignments, which is abstracted in the recursion (not counting the additional assignments that will likely occur due to function overhead, assuming it's not inlined).


EDIT:

Ok, allocated on the stack globally, hence no assignments, even in assembly. Terrible code as far linked lists (or anything else) goes, but whatever :-)

struct node
{
  int data;
  struct node * next;
};

struct node g_nodes[3] = { {1, g_nodes+1}, {2, g_nodes+2}, {3, NULL} };    
struct node * build_123()
{
  return g_nodes;
}
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I actually wanted to do this, too, but it somehow defeats the purpose of using a linked list: you can't remove arbitrary nodes and then free their memory; it might still be useful if you pre-allocate a larger amount of nodes and just add removed one's to a free list... –  Christoph Feb 6 '09 at 21:14
    
Agreed, I was merely trying to reduce number of assignments, not considering anything else :-) –  codelogic Feb 6 '09 at 21:17
    
@codelogic: That's the spirit - knowing how to reduce assignments whatever the cost will be real useful in practice ;) You just have to love these interview questions... –  Christoph Feb 6 '09 at 21:26

You can allocate all three nodes with a single malloc() call. I suspect this is the answer they're looking for. While reducing the number of assignments isn't a practical issue, bundling multiple allocations into a single malloc() may simplify memory management. I expect that most senior C developers would be familiar with this technique.

struct node* BuildOneTwoThree() {
    struct node *list = malloc(3 * sizeof(struct node));

    list[0].data = 1;
    list[0].next = list+1;
    list[1].data = 2;
    list[1].next = list+2;
    list[2].data = 3;
    list[2].next = NULL;

    return list;
}
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As no-one said anything about this not being C++, here's a C++ version with no assignments except in the test code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct Node {

    int mVal;
    Node * mNext;

    Node( int v, Node * n ) 
        : mVal( v ), mNext( n ) {}

    ~Node() {
        delete mNext;
    }
};

int main() {

    // build the list
    Node n( 1, new Node( 2, new Node( 3, 0 ) ) );

    // test it
    Node * p = & n;
    while( p ) {
        cout << p->mVal << endl;
        p = p->mNext;
    }

    return 0;
}
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